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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Index. (search)
lace bled, Burns's, 18. Scott, Sir, Walter, 36, 85, 90, 93, 96, 97, 98, 187, 259, 269, 274, 275, 277. Scudder, Horace E., 134. Sedgwick, Catharine Maria, 126, 148. Self-culture, Channing's, 114. Serene I Fold my hands, Burroughs's, 264. Seven Pines, Battle of, 217. Sewall, Samuel, 27-35. Seward, Miss, Anna, 75, 259. Shakespeare, 1, 108, 138. Shelley, 72, 177, 183, 215, 223, 258, 261, 277, 280. Shelley, Mrs., 71. Shepard, Thomas, 19. Sherman, Gen. W. T., 101. Simms, William Gilmore, 204, 206. Skeleton in armor, Longfellow's, 142. Sketch book, Irving's, 85, 86, 90, 103. Sky Walk, Brown's, 70. Smith, Capt., John, 7. Smith, Joseph, 69. Smoke, Thoreau's, 264. Snow-bound, Whittier's, 264. Society of Friends, 146. Song of the broad-axe, Whitman's, 229. Southey, Robert, 258. Sparkling and Bright, Hoffman's, 105. Sparks, Jared, 71, 116, 117. Spenser, Edmund, 260, 253. Spinning, Mrs. Jackson's, 264. Spofford, Harriet Prescott, 264. Spy, C
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), chapter 1.9 (search)
d, George William Curtis, Park Benjamin, Rufus W. Griswold, Richard Henry Stoddard, C. F. Briggs, and many more; and among other contributors of the early time were Miss Sedgwick, James Gates Percival, Richard Henry Wilde, Mrs. Sigourney, William Gilmore Simms, J. G. Whittier, Horace Greeley, and James Fenimore Cooper. The importance of The Knickerbocker magazine may be judged by this list of names; yet in dignity of tone and especially in the quality of its humour it was somewhat below the stl returns. According to a somewhat dubious tradition its decline began when Graham published a harshly unfavourable review of Uncle Tom's cabin. Among the contributors to Graham's in its best days were Cooper, Longfellow, Lowell, Hawthorne, and Simms. Most of the Southern magazines were still conducted in a spirit of patriotism and local literary pride, rather than as paying business ventures. The most famous of these, The Southern literary Messenger, was founded at Richmond in 1834. It
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 3: poets of the Civil War II (search)
idered a literary centre. Here for many years Simms, See also Book II, Chap. VII. as the edito of friends and younger men who gathered about Simms, the most promising was Paul Hamilton Hayne (1 Sea. Henry Timrod (1829-67), the friend of Simms and Hayne, had also definitely dedicated himseedition may doubtless be attributed to William Gilmore Simms's War poetry of the South (1866). It w said for the critical standards which allowed Simms to publish so much unworthy poetry, none more the value of the book and our appreciation of Simms's critical judgment. In 1869 appeared The S, biographical sketches, and bibliographies of Simms, Hayne, Mrs. Preston, Flash, and Randall, and crap-books, collected in volumes like those of Simms and Miss Mason, sifted by the later editors ancame more and more uncertain, William Gilmore Simms, now in his old age, did all in his power to rs of his poetry. As a connecting link between Simms and Lanier he has a permanent place in the lit[3 more...]
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 5: dialect writers (search)
by Joel Chandler Harris. The chief writers who preceded Harris in the attempt to portray negro character were William Gilmore Simms, See also Book II, Chap. VII. Edgar Allan Poe, See also Book II, Chap. XIV. Harriet Beecher Stowe, See also Book III, Chap. XI. Stephen Collins Foster, and Irwin Russell. Hector, the negro slave in Simms's Yemassee (1835), and Jupiter in Poe's Gold-Bug (1843) are alike in many respects. Both belong to the type of faithful body servant, For theapter 51) to accept freedom when it is offered to him by his owner is by no means surprising; it is an evidence rather of Simms's familiarity with negro character and a reminder of the anomalous position in which a freedman in those days found himse and untranslatable mixture of English and African words. Though it was used in a diluted form here and there by Poe and Simms and though Harris employs it for some of the stories in his Nights with Uncle Remus, it can hardly be said to have found
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
Rebellion, 106 Shelley, 66, 327 Shelton, Mrs., 60 Sheridan, R. B., 230 Sheridan at Cedar Creek, 279, 285 Sheridan's Ride, 279, 285 Sherman, 308, 325, 350 Sherman's in Savannah, 284 Sherman's March to the sea, 284 Shew, Mrs., 60, 66 Shillaber, Benjamin Penhallow, 155 Short Sixes, 386 Sidney, Margaret, 402 'Sieur George, 384 Sights from a Steeple, 22 Sigourney, Mrs., 167, 398, 399 Silas Marner, 340 Silcher, 353 Silence, 68 Silent March, 308 Simms, W. G., 167, 168, 292, 293, 298, 300, 301, 302, 305, 308, 311, 312, 351, 352, 358 Simonides, 3 Simple Cobler of Aggawam in America, the, 149 Sinking of the Merrimac, the, 282 Sinners in the hands of an angry God, 215 Sir Copp, 286 Sismondi, 125, 128 Sisters, the, 48 Six sermons on intemperance, 214 Skeleton in Armor, the, 36 Skipper Ireson's Ride, 48 Sketch Book, the, 10, 22, 32, 368, 369, 378 Sketches of North Carolina, 318 Sketches of Paris, 152 Slamm, Levi
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 40: outrages in Kansas.—speech on Kansas.—the Brooks assault.—1855-1856. (search)
the recognized organs of Southern opinion applauded the assault, declaring it good in conception, better in execution, and best of all in consequences, Richmond Enquirer, June 12. The best known representative of Southern literature, William Gilmore Simms, justified the assault; and his feelings were so strong that he could not withhold them from a New York audience, Nov. 18, 1856; but his indiscretion at once broke up his enterprise as a lecturer at the North. Simms's Life, by W. P. TrenSimms's Life, by W. P. Trent, pp. 220-224. and threatening like discipline and punishment to all Northern members of Congress who should dare, as they called it, to slander the South. This exultation was marked by a coarseness and brutality in sentiment, set off in incoherent and even clumsy language, in which it now seems incredible that a civilized people could indulge. These exhibitions were well compared at the time to a dance of savages over a collection of scalps, and contrasted with the Northern discussion of
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
ginia and brought up in Richmond, cherished a passion as intense as Simms's for his native state and deliberately set out to celebrate its paerefore had a wide circulation and was reprinted in 1852 by William Gilmore Simms See Book II, Chap. VII. in his collection entitled Pro-His Memoir on slavery, published in 1838, was likewise reprinted in Simms's collection. In contrast to the dictum of Jefferson that all men s from their publications by American authors of belles-lettres. Simms, See Book II, Chap. VI. 4 See Book II, Chap. VII. in 1844, tho Book III, Chap. XI. were rewarding him richly in the thirties. Simms affirms that up to the year 1834 American literature was with a fewyet be said upon the concentration of American publishing. In 1858 Simms wrote: We have not a single publisher in the whole South, from the Russell's magazine, June, 1858, p. 202. There is a possibility that Simms did not write this unsigned article Concentration of population and
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
285 Short, Charles Lancaster, 461, 463 Short history of paper money and banking, a, 438 Short introduction to the Latin tongue, a, 390, 444 Shut your mouth, 149 Siberia, 608 Siberian exile system, the, 165 Sights and scenes in the Goldregions, 145 Siljestrom, 406 Sill, E. R., 31, 53, 56-59, 64, 245 Siller, Franz, 581 Silver and Gold, 440 Silver Dagger, the, 512 Silver Pound, the, 440 Silver question, the, 440 Silver situation, the, 443 Simms, E. D., 479 Simms, W. G., 67, 338, 542, 549, 551, 551 n. Simon the Cyrenian, 267 Simpson, Henry I., 145 Simpson, S., 436 Singer, 481 Sir Hugh, 507 Sitting Bull, 159 Sixty years in public affairs, 351 Sixty years with the Bible, 206 Skal, Georg von, 579 Sketch Book, 125 Sketches of the rise and progress of Secession, 352 Sketches on a tour through the Northern and Eastern States, 162 Sketches on Rotations of crops, 430 Sketch of an English school, 393 Sketch of the finances
Wm. Gilmore Simms. --The Charleston Courier, alluding to the recent calamity which befell the distinguished Southern author, Wm. Gilmore Simms, says: He has, indeed, been sorely tried, most sadly beset by family afflictions and pecuniary lots . He has buried nine of fourteen children, one or more of them recently; within the past two years he lost his dwelling-house in this city, by fire, and was entirely uninsured; and now a fire of unknown origin has consumed his noble and hospitaWm. Gilmore Simms, says: He has, indeed, been sorely tried, most sadly beset by family afflictions and pecuniary lots . He has buried nine of fourteen children, one or more of them recently; within the past two years he lost his dwelling-house in this city, by fire, and was entirely uninsured; and now a fire of unknown origin has consumed his noble and hospitable homestead, with many valuables, and he is rendered homeless and houseless.--This happened, too, while he was benevolently sheltering two families besides his own. He was insured in the Fireman's Insurance Company; and he will scarcely receive the full amount of his policy, in consequence of the heavy losses of that company by the late disastrous conflagration; but we have reason to believe that he will realize more than he and his neighbor friends anticipate. In addition to his other
Wm. G. Simms and G, D. Prentice. There is no better evidence of the fact that the present existence is but a period ofose which head this article. The Southern friends of Wm. Gilmore Simms, of South Carolina, have been deeply grieved to learnehold word. "Patient of labor, and strong to endure, Mr. Simms has borne poverty, misfortune, exile and neglect, with a nlarged, or his State love stimulated and strengthened by Mr. Simms's labors, come forward to raise from the dust the generouor in the field" In contrast to the sad fate of Wm. Gilmore Simms, is the career of George D. Prentice, famous in the U habits. Without a tenth of the originality and talent of Simms, and without the capacity to imitate or even to believe in cur his reward. The bitterest cup of misfortune which poor Simms has drained would be a goblet of-nectar in comparison with miration and this honor will be permitted, in the case of Mr. Simms, to assume a form more substantial than words, and that V
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