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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 2: poets of the Civil War I (search)
H. Duganne, in his impetuous Bethel, sang of the heroism but not the blunders of that battle, the chief victim of which, Theodore Winthrop, See also Book III, Chap. XI. was the subject of Thomas William Parsons's lofty Dirge for one who fell in battle. Bull Run, theme of many exultant Southern ballads and satires, See also Book III, Chap. III. brought from Boker the impassioned Upon the Hill before Centreville. In the controversy with England which followed the seizure of Mason and Slidell, Lowell wrote his spirited and determined Jonathan to John, second in the new series of Biglow papers. During September, 1861, Mrs. Ethelinda, (Ethel Lynn) Beers wrote The Picket-Guard (attributed in the South to Lamar Fontaine or Thaddeus Oliver), a widely popular piece expressing sympathy with the minor and unnoted victims of the conflict. Also popular was the anonymous Tardy George, that is, General McClellan, of whom the North demanded more activity than he ever attained. In the same
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
01, 302, 305, 308, 311, 312, 351, 352, 358 Simonides, 3 Simple Cobler of Aggawam in America, the, 149 Sinking of the Merrimac, the, 282 Sinners in the hands of an angry God, 215 Sir Copp, 286 Sismondi, 125, 128 Sisters, the, 48 Six sermons on intemperance, 214 Skeleton in Armor, the, 36 Skipper Ireson's Ride, 48 Sketch Book, the, 10, 22, 32, 368, 369, 378 Sketches of North Carolina, 318 Sketches of Paris, 152 Slamm, Levi D., 264 n. Sleeper, the, 65 Slidell, J., 280 Smedes, Susan Dabney, 314 Smith, C. A., 66 n. Smith, Charles Henry, 153 Smith, F. Hopkinson, 391 Smith, S. F., 226 Smith, Samuel Harrison, 183 Smith, Seba, 151 Smith, Sydney, 16 Snow, George M., 192 Snow-Bound, 42, 43, 46, 48-49, 50, 353 Snow Image, the, 20 Solomon, 381 Soldier boy series, 404 Some variant Pronunciations in the New South, 365 Song of Myself, 264 Song of Sherman's Army, the, 284 Song of the soldiers, 286 Songs before Sunrise, 2
es of America win that place among nations, it might be right for other nations justly to acknowledge an independence achieved by victory and maintained by a successful resistance to all attempts to overthrow it. That time, however, has not, in the judgment of her Majesty's government, yet arrived. Her Majesty's government, therefore, can only hope that a peaceful termination of the present bloody and destructive contest may not be distant. I am, etc., Russell. Lord Russell to Mason, Slidell, and Mann. Foreign office, February 13, 1865. gentlemen: Some time ago I had the honor to inform you, in answer to a statement which you sent me, that her Majesty remained neutral in the deplorable contest now carried on in North America, and that her Majesty intended to persist in that course. It is now my duty to request you to bring to the notice of the authorities under whom you act, with a view to their serious consideration thereof, the just complaints which her Majesty's gover
es of America win that place among nations, it might be right for other nations justly to acknowledge an independence achieved by victory and maintained by a successful resistance to all attempts to overthrow it. That time, however, has not, in the judgment of her Majesty's government, yet arrived. Her Majesty's government, therefore, can only hope that a peaceful termination of the present bloody and destructive contest may not be distant. I am, etc., Russell. Lord Russell to Mason, Slidell, and Mann. Foreign office, February 13, 1865. gentlemen: Some time ago I had the honor to inform you, in answer to a statement which you sent me, that her Majesty remained neutral in the deplorable contest now carried on in North America, and that her Majesty intended to persist in that course. It is now my duty to request you to bring to the notice of the authorities under whom you act, with a view to their serious consideration thereof, the just complaints which her Majesty's gover
II, 346. Slaughter's house, Cedar Mountain, Va. , II., 29. Slaughter Mountain, Va., II., 26. Slavery: not the South's reason for fighting, VIII., 116; IX., 294, 316; X., 134. Sledd, B., IX., 190. Sledge of Nashville: name given to General Thomas, III., 263. Sleeper, Captain Iii., 71. Sleeping for the flag, XI. C. Work, IX., 344. Sleeping on guard, execution for, VIII., 96. Slemmer, A. J.: I., 4, 86, 347 seq.; V., 59; VIII., 106, 156. Slidell, J.: I., 354; VI., 291, 298, 299, 310, 312. Slocum, H. W.: I., 44, 321, 328; II., 108, 110, 248, 254, 334, 340; III, 138, 222, 232, 244, 347; X., 162, 177, 182. Sloo, A., L, 179. Sloss, R., I, 10. Slough, J. B., X., 195. Slye, D. W., VII., 125. Small arms V., 134. Smallpox: deaths from, VII, 320; hospital barge for, on the Mississippi, VII., 320. Smart, C., VII., 224. Smeed, E. C.: V., 295, 298. Smith, A., X., 2. Smith, A. J.:
Government have never presumed to judge. They deplored the commencement of this sanguinary struggle, and anxiously look forward to the period of its termination. In the meantime, they are convinced that they best consult the interests of peace and respect the rights of all parties by observing a strict and impartial neutrality. Such neutrality Her Majesty has faithfully maintained, and will continue to maintain. I request you, gentlemen, to except, etc., Russell. To J. Slidell, Esq., J. Mason, Esq., a Dudley Mann, Esq. The London Times fears that Earl Russell's letter will find no favor either with the North or South. First, he snubs the Confederates--they are only "so-called Confederate States," and have yet to establish their right to the appellation. This, too, is a compliment to the United States, but then follows a counter snub to the United States--they are the formerly "united republic."--But to say they were "formerly united" is to imply they are no
of His Majesty, the King of Sweden and Norway, has lately received the letter addressed to him, under date of Paris, the 11th of November last, by Messrs. Mason, Slidell and Dudley Mann, Commissioners of the Confederate States of America, and which communicates to the Government of the King, his august sovereign, the manifesto adof the United Kingdom has entertained the most cordial relations. In obeying this order, the undersigned profits by the opportunity to offer to Messrs. Mason, Slidell and Mann the assurance of his very distinguished consideration. Manderstroem. The Government of the Netherlands Expresses an earnest desire for the re-estacopy of the manifesto issued at Richmond on the 14th of June, 1864. In thanking you for the communication, and with an earnest wish for the prompt re-establishment of peace in America, I beg you, gentlemen, to accept the assurance of my high consideration. E. Crewens. Messrs. J. Slidell, J. M. Mason and A. Dudley Mann.