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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 189 43 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 75 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 60 18 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 54 18 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 35 17 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 35 19 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 33 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 32 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 2 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 10 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for E. Kirby Smith or search for E. Kirby Smith in all documents.

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Border forays, skirmishes and Outrages Marmaduke's raid in Missouri Cabell's brigade organized attack on Federals at Fayetteville organization under E. Kirby Smith assault upon Helena, July 4, 1863 reports of the action. Early in 1863 there was a formidable array of Federal forces confronting the Southern troops into the Lee's creek road, between Fayetteville and Van Buren, to prevent any force moving up east of his position, until Colonel Harrison should move. Lieut.-Gen. E. Kirby Smith had been assigned, January 14, to the command of the Southwestern army, embracing the troops in west Louisiana and Texas, and on February 9th his commanion lately commanded by General Hindman, who had been relieved from duty in the TransMissis-sippi, January 30th. On March 18th, the secretary of war advised General Smith that a pressing necessity would require the latter's presence at an early day in Arkansas. The secretary wrote: From a variety of sources, many of which I can
General Holmes for duty. August 10th Col. T. P Dockery had been ordered to report to Lieut.-Gen. E. Kirby Smith. He was directed: To assemble the scattered and furloughed men, who had passed wes against Steele. Following is the organization of the Confederate forces in Arkansas, Gen. E. Kirby Smith commanding, April 20, 1864: District of Arkansas, Maj.-Gen. Sterling Price; escort, Fames Riley; Second regiment, Col. Simpson W. Folsom. Walker's division, Arrived after Gen. E. K. Smith reached the field. General Price assumed command of Arkansas and Missouri divisions, April. N. Waul, William R. Scurry and Col. Horace Randal. Arkansas division, Arrived after Gen. E. K. Smith reached the field. General Price assumed command of Arkansas and Missouri divisions, April Hawthorn's brigade, Brig.-Gen. Alexander T. Hawthorn. Missouri division, Arrived after Gen. E. K. Smith reached the field. General Price assumed command of Arkansas and Missouri divisions, April
orrid drama was ended. The Trans-Mississippi was the last to surrender. In general orders, dated April 21, 1865, Gen. E. K. Smith exhorted the soldiers of the Trans-Mississippi to stand by their colors: Great disasters have overtaken us. The ippi: Terms of a Military Convention entered into this 26th day of May, 1865, at New Orleans, La., between Gen. E. Kirby Smith, C. S. Army, commanding the department of Trans-Mississippi, and Maj.-Gen. E. R. S. Canby, U. S. Army, commanding ississippi department. I. All acts of war and resistance against the United States on the part of the troops under General Smith shall cease from this date. II. The officers and men to be paroled until duly exchanged, or otherwise released fr the nearest practicable point to their homes. (Signed) S. B. Buckner, Lieutenant-General and Chief of Staff. (For Gen. E. Kirby Smith.) (Signed) P. Jos. Osterhaus, Major-General of Volunteers and Chief of Staff. (For Maj.-Gen. E. R. S. Canby, comma
ost a leg at the battle of Resaca, May, 1864, and J. T. Smith, appointed colonel, was killed in battle July 28th, James P. Eagle then succeeding him as colonel of the regiment. Ten years afterward, Colonel Eagle was speaker of the house of representatives, and after another decade was elected governor of Arkansas, as which he served two terms. Captain Witherspoon became attorney-general. The regiment took part in the battles of Oak Hills and Elkhorn, and in the Kentucky campaign under E. Kirby Smith. Among its battles were Richmond, Ky., Murfreesboro, Jackson, Miss., Chickamauga, Resaca, Atlanta, Ezra Church, Lovejoy's Station, Jonesboro, Moore's Station, Franklin, Tenn., Nashville, Sugar Creek, and Bentonville, N. C. It surrendered with Johnston, April 26, 1865, at Greensboro, N. C. The Third Arkansas State regiment, cavalry, which served in the brigade of Gen. N. B. Pearce at Oak Hills, was commanded by Col. De Rosey Carroll, a planter advanced in years, and an ardent Souther
reys' battery, in General Churchill's brigade. In command of the army of the Mississippi, Bragg advanced from Tupelo to Chattanooga in July. May 9th, Maj.-Gen. E. Kirby Smith was assigned to the district of East Tennessee. In August, reinforced by McCown's division, sent early in July, General Smith moved into Kentucky througGeneral Smith moved into Kentucky through Big Creek gap, and meeting with no serious resistance moved across to Cumberland ford, where he gave his barefooted soldiers a rest of two or three days, feeding them with roasting ears and beef without salt, but promising to regale them better when they reached the bluegrass country. Brig.-Gen. T. J. Churchill commanded the Third division (McCown's) of Smith's army, with one brigade under Col. T. H. McCray—Thirty-first Arkansas (sharpshooters), and several Texas regiments—and Churchill's brigade, under Col. Evander McNair. At Nelson's gap the army was joined by a division under Colonel Cleburne, including the brigades of Preston Smith and B. J. Hill, th