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le (Tenn.) Register, Dec. 3, gives the following account of this affair: This morning a band of Lincolnites from Kentucky, assisted by a number of stories of Scott County, entered the village of Huntsville, Tenn., and seized the persons of John L. Smith, John Catlin, Calvin Smith, Sterling Smith, Joe Smith, and five others, whose names we could not procure, and immediately started with them to Kentucky as prisoners of war, at the same time taking about a dozen head of horses. All the gentlemen abducted were quiet, unoffending citizens, belonging to no military organization in the Confederate service. Their only crime was that they were secessionists. John L. Smith is a clerk, and master of the Chancery Court at Huntsville, at least seventy years of age, and is respected by all who know him in the very highest degree, and the others abducted are equally esteemed. The party from whom we derived this information, Mr. William Anderson, was likewise captured by the marauders, but m
ed, few as they were, to accomplish the work of many; and, so far as the success of your operations before this city depended on labors peculiar to their corps, no words of mine can overrate their services. The officers thus engaged are Major John L. Smith, Captains R. E. Lee and John Sanders, First Lieutenants J. L. Mason, P. G. T. Beauregard, and I. I. Stevens, Second Lieutenants Z. B. Tower and G. W. Smith, Brevet Second Lieutenants G. B. McClellan and J. G. Foster. The obligation liesan Cosme garita, or gate. Of the nature of the important services performed by the company and its officers at this point, and also after the capture of the city, a correct notion may be formed from the statement contained in the report of Major J. L. Smith, of the Engineer Corps:-- Lieutenant G. W. Smith, commanding the sappers, arrived on the ground some time after this, while our troops were in front of the battery at the garita,--the other batteries on the road up to that point having b
A gallant Exploit.--Lieut.-Col. Spears, of Bird's 1st Tennessee regiment, now stationed near Somerset, is in our city. He brought as prisoners John L. Smith, his two sons, Joseph M. and Calvin, and two other active secessionists, who were arrested by a refugee Tennesseean named John Smith, who is now in the patriot ranks of our State. John Smith, when called upon to decide between the Union and the Confederacy, lived in or near Huntsville, and loyally determined to adhere to the Stars and Stripes. Jeff. Davis' proclamation warning all to leave the Confederacy who did not sympathize with the rebellion, induced him to sell his property preparatory to leaving, and he converted the proceeds into gold. But about the same time came the blockade order of Gov. Harris, forbidding any one to quit the State. John Smith was then seized by the five men who are here as prisoners, aided by some secession cavalry, and scourged and abused in various demoniac ways, until he revealed where his m
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reunion of Company D. First regiment Virginia Cavalry, C. S. A. (search)
Alexander Buskell, John Bryant, T. M. Clapp, W. L. Colley, John G. R. Davis, William L. Dunn, F. S. Findlay, M. H. Latham, David Lowry, Charles Morrell, James H. Page, Thomas Preston, F. S. Robertson, John B. Richards, John L. Smith, W. L. Snodgrass, Thomas K. Trigg, Wm. Buchanan, S. D. Black, James H. Clark, Thomas W. Colley, L. T. Cosby, David Debusk, M. V. Edmondson, Benjamin Gildersleeve, B. D. Ligon, Lil. Montgomery, R. M. Page, R. B. Preston, JDavid Ryburn, killed. F. S. Robertson. J. A. Rodefer. John B. Richards. D. P. Sandoe, dead. Robert Sanders. J. W. S. Sanders, wounded. S. D. Sanders. W. E. Scott, dead. J. J. Schwartz, wounded and dead. William Smith. John L. Smith. Thomas Smith. William (Buck) Smith, dead. William L. Snodgrass. W. Trigg Strother. Thomas J. Sheppard. C. F. Trigg. Thomas K. Trigg. W. W. Vaughan, wounded. John G. White, wounded. William White. R. C. Williams, killed.
id shot, some of which must have struck, but with what injury to the enemy we are unable to say. * * * * * * * * * Very respectfully, your ob't serv't, John R. Tucker, Com. C. S. N. Hon. S. R. Maltery, Sec'y Navy, Richmond. Lincoln vessels Entering Pagan Creek--"heavy firing." A correspondent from Suffolk, December 2d, of the Petersburg Express, says: Information reached here on Saturday that two on three Lincoln vessels had entered the mouth of Pagan creek, on which Smith field is situated. This morning, about 4 o'clock, heavy firing commenced in that direction and continued for nearly four hours, firing every half minute and minute. Nothing has been heard as to what the firing means. Some are confident that it was an engagement between the blockading vessels and some of our batteries; others suppose that the firing was on the other side of the James, and was an engagement between the forces of Magruder and the enemy. A gentleman just arrived in town supp
lowing: A gentleman just arrived from Scott county, informs us that on Sunday morning last a band of Lincolnites from Kentucky, assisted by a number of Tories of that county, entered the village of Huntsville, and seized the persons of John L. Smith, Carlin, Calvin Smith, Sterling Smith Smith, and five others, whose names we could not procure, and immediately started with them to Kentucky as prisoners of war, the same time taking about a dozen head of All the gentlemen abducted were unoffending citizens, belonging to no littery organization in the Confederate Their only crime was that they were John L. Smith, is clerk and of the chancery court at Huntsville least seventy years of age, and is respected all who know him in the very highest de and the others abducted are equally seemed. The party from whom we derived this information, Mr. William Anderson, was like captured by the marauders, but made escape. He says he could not ascertain precincts number of the