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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 33 15 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 11 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 1 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 3 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 3 1 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 3 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 3 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 3 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 2 2 Browse Search
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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Headquarters moved to Holly Springs-General McClernand in command-assuming command at Young's Point-operations above Vicksburg- fortifications about Vicksburg-the canal- Lake Providence-operations at Yazoo pass (search)
the 24th General Ross, with his brigade of about 4,500 men on transports, moved into this new water-way. The rebels had obstructed the navigation of Yazoo Pass and the Coldwater by felling trees into them. Much of the timber in this region being of greater specific gravity than water, and being of great size, their removal was a matter of great labor; but it was finally accomplished, and on the 11th of March Ross found himself, accompanied by two gunboats under the command of Lieutenant-Commander Watson Smith, confronting a fortification at Greenwood, where the Tallahatchie and Yallabusha unite and the Yazoo begins. The bends of the rivers are such at this point as to almost form an island, scarcely above water at that stage of the river. This island was fortified and manned. It was named Fort Pemberton after the commander at Vicksburg. No land approach was accessible. The troops, therefore, could render no assistance towards an assault further than to establish a battery on a
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, The bayous West of the Mississippi-criticisms of the Northern press-running the batteries-loss of the Indianola-disposition of the troops (search)
had reached New Carthage with one division and its artillery, the latter ferried through the woods by these boats. On the 17th I visited New Carthage in person, and saw that the process of getting troops through in the way we were doing was so tedious that a better method must be devised. The water was falling, and in a few Vicksburg Campain days there would not be depth enough to use boats; nor would the land be dry enough to march over. McClernand had already found a new route from Smith's plantation where the crevasse occurred, to Perkins' plantation, eight to twelve miles below New Carthage. This increased the march from Milliken's Bend from twenty-seven to nearly forty miles. Four bridges had to be built across bayous, two of them each over six hundred feet long, making about two thousand feet of bridging in all. The river falling made the current in these bayous very rapid, increasing the difficulty of building and permanently fastening these bridges; but the ingenuity
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opening of the lower Mississippi. (search)
The place which I had selected for the first and third divisions of the mortar-vessels was under the lee of a thick wood on the right bank of the river, which presented in the direction of the fort an almost impenetrable mass. The forts could be plainly seen from the mast-heads of the mortar-schooners, which had been so covered with brush that the Confederate gunners could not distinguish them from the trees. The leading vessel of the first division, of seven vessels, under Lieutenant-Commanding Watson Smith, was placed at a point distant 2850 yards from Fort Jackson and 3680 yards from Fort St. Philip. The third division, commanded by Lieutenant Breese, came next in order, and the second division, under Lieutenant Queen, I placed on the east side of the river, the head of the line being 3680 yards from Fort Jackson. The vessels now being in position, the signal was given to open fire; and on the morning of the 18th of April the bombardment fairly commenced, each mortar-vessel
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the operations at New Orleans, La. (search)
amers (ferry-boats): Clifton, Lieutenant C. H. Baldwin; John P. Jackson, Lieutenant Selim E. Woodworth; Westfield, Commander W. B. Renshaw. Side-wheel steamer (double-ender): Miami, Lieutenant A. D. Harrell. First division of schooners, Lieutenant Watson Smith, commanding: Norfolk Packet, Lieutenant Watson Smith; Oliver H. Lee, Acting Master Washington Godfrey; Para, Acting Master Edward G. Furber; C. P. Williams, Acting Master Amos R. Langthorne; Arletta, Armaments of Union fleet. vesseLieutenant Watson Smith; Oliver H. Lee, Acting Master Washington Godfrey; Para, Acting Master Edward G. Furber; C. P. Williams, Acting Master Amos R. Langthorne; Arletta, Armaments of Union fleet. vessels. 13-in. mortar. 11-in. S. B. 10-in. S. B. 9-in. S. B. 8-in. S. B. 32-pdr. S. B. 100-pdr. R. 80-pdr. R. 50-pdr. R. 30-pdr. R. 20-pdr. R. 6-in. Sawyer Rifte, 87 cwt. Total guns. Howitzers. Total including Howitzers. 24-pdr. 12-pdr. Total. Hartford       24 2 of these were transferred from the Colorado.             2   26   2 2 28 Brooklyn       22       1   1     24   2 2 26 Richmond       20       1   1     22       22 Pensacola   1  
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Naval operations in the Vicksburg campaign. (search)
Lieutenant-Commander James W. Shirk; and the tin-clads, Rattler, Lieutenant-Commander Watson Smith, and Glide, Lieutenant S. E. Woodworth. McClernand's force, comple-shells. When the guns on the river-side had been partly silenced, Lieutenant-Commander Smith in the Rattler was ordered to pass the fort and enfilade it, which hegreat importance. The naval expedition, which was commanded by Lieutenant-Commander Watson Smith, was composed of two iron-clads, the Chillicothe, Lieutenant-Commdier-General I. F. Quinby took part in the movement. On the 28th of February Smith's flotilla reached the Coldwater. Notwithstanding the work which had been doneind them. The Confederates had put to the fullest use the time given them by Smith's dilatory advance. A hastily constructed work of earth and cotton bales, call badly racked by the enemy's fire, showing plainly her defective construction. Smith, who had started on the expedition in failing health, was now sent back in the
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Union vessels in the Vicksburg operations. (search)
R. Langthorne, 6 howitzers; Forest Rose, Act. V. Lieut. George W. Brown, December, 1862, 2 guns, 4 howitzers; August 19th, 1863, 4 guns, 4 howitzers; Glide, Act. Lieut. S. E. Woodworth (Ark. Post); Juliet, Act. V. Lieut. Ed. Shaw, 6 howitzers; Linden, Act. V. Lieut. T. E. Smith, Act. Master T. M. Farrell, 6 howitzers; Marmora, Act. V. Lieut. Robert Getty, September, 1862, 4 howitzers; December, 1862, 8 howitzers; Petrel, Act. Master T. McElroy, Act. V. Lieut. John Pearce; Rattler, Lieut.-Com. Watson Smith (Ark. Post, Yazoo Pass), Act. Master W. E. H. Fentress, 8 howitzers; Romeo, Act. Ens. R. B. Smith (Yazoo River, December, 1862), Act. Master T. Baldwin, 6 howitzers; Signal, Act. V. Lieut. John Scott, Act. V. Lieut. C. Dominy, September, 1862, 4 howitzers; May, 1863, 6 howitzers; November, 1863, 2 guns, 6 howitzers. various vessels.--Alexandria, Act. Master D., P. Rosenmiller, 2 howitzers; Argosy, Act. Ens. J. C. Morong, 7 howitzers; Black Hawk, Lieut.-Com. K. R. Breese (Ark. P
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Mississippi flotilla in the Red River expedition. (search)
Robert Townsend, 2 100-pounder Parrotts, 6 9-inch, 4 12-pounder howitzers. Benton, Lieut.-Com. James A. Greer, 2 100-pounder Parrotts, 8 9-inch, 2 50-pounder Dahlgren rifles, 4 32-pounders. Lafayette, Lieut.-Com. J. P. Foster, 2 11-inch, 2 9-inch, 2 100-pounder Parrotts, 2 24-pounder howitzers, 2 12-pounder howitzers. Choctaw, Lieut.-Com. F. M. Ramsay, 1 100-pounder Parrott, 3 9-inch, 2 30-pounder Parrotts, 2 12-pounder howitzers. Chillicothe, Act. V. Lieut. Joseph P. Couthouy, Lieut.-Com. Watson Smith (temporarily), 2 11-inch, 1 12-pounder. Ozark, Act. V. Lieut. George W. Brown, 2 11-inch, 1 12-pounder rifled howitzer. Louisville, Lieut.-Com. E. K. Owen, 1 100-pounder Parrott, 4 9-inch, 2 30-pounder Parrotts, 4 32-pounders. Carondelet, Lieut.-Com. J. G. Mitchell, 2 100-pounder Parrotts, 3 9-inch, 4 8-inch, 1 50-pounder rifle, 1 30-pounder rifle. Eastport, Lieut.-Com. S. L. Phelps, 2 100-pounder Parrotts, 4 9-inch, 2 50-pounder Dahlgren rifles. Pittsburgh, Act. V. Lieut. W. R
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in Arkansas, April 20, 1864. (search)
Battalion, Maj. E . L. McMurtrey. Artillery: Ark. Battery, Capt. W. M. Hughey. Marmaduke's cavalry division, Brig.-Gen. John S. Marmaduke. Greene's Brigade, Col. Colton Greene: 3d Mo., Lieut.-Col. L. A. Campbell; 4th Mo., Lieut.-Col. W. J. Preston; 7th Mo.,----; 8th Mo., Col. W. L. Jeffers; 10th Mo., Col. R. R. Leather; Mo. Battery, Capt.----Harris. Shelby's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Joseph O. Shelby: 1st Mo., Battalion, Maj. Benjamin Elliott; 5th Mo., Col. B. F. Gordon; 11th Mo., Col. M . W. Smith; 12th Mo., Col. David Shanks; Hunter's Reg't, Col. D. C. Hunter; Mo. Battery, Capt. R. A. Collins. Maxey's cavalry division, Brig.-Gen. Saml. B. Maxey. Gano's Brigade, Col. Charles De Morse: 29th Tex., Maj. J. A. Carroll; 30th Tex., Lieut.-Col. N. W. Battle; 31st Tex., Maj. M. Looscan; Welch's Co., Lieut. Frank M. Gano; Tex. Battery, Capt. W. B. Krumbhaar. Choctaw Brigade, Col. Tandy Walker: 1st Regiment, Lieut.-Col. James Riley; 2d Regiment, Col. Simpson W. Folsom. Walker's divisi
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 13: the capture of New Orleans. (search)
nt Harrison, 5; Winona, Lieutenant Nichols, 4; Katahdin, Lieutenant Preble, 6; Itaska, Lieutenant Caldwell, 5; Kineo, Lieutenant Ransom, 5; Wissahickon, Lieutenant A. N. Smith, 5; Pinola, Lieutenant Crosby; Kennebec, Lieutenant Russell, 5; Sciota, Lieutenant Donalson, 6; schooner Kittatinny, Lieutenant Lamson, 9; Miami, Lieutenant Harroll, 6; Clifton, 5; and Westfield, Captain Renshaw, 6. There were twenty mortar-vessels, in three divisions, the first, or Red, of six vessels, under Lieutenant Watson Smith, in the Norfolk Packet; the second, or Blue, of seven vessels, commanded by Lieutenant Queen, in the T. A. Ward; and the third, or White, of seven vessels, commanded by Lieutenant Breese, in the Horace Beales. The names of the mortar-vessels were: Norfolk Packet, Oliver H. Lee, Para, C. P. Williams, Orletta, William Bacon, T. A. Ward, Sidney C. Jones, Matthew Vassar, Jr., Maria J. Carlton, Orvetta, Adolphe Hugel, George Mangham, Horace Beales, John Griffith, Sarah Bruin, Racer, Sea
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 22: the siege of Vicksburg. (search)
lding gunboats and transports on those two chief affluents of the Yazoo, and the destruction of these was an important object of the proposed expedition. About five thousand men were assigned to the Yazoo expedition. It was led by General L. F. Ross, with a division of McClernand's corps, and the Twelfth and Seventeenth Missouri, of Sherman's corps; and with it went the large gun-boats Chillicothe and De Kalb, five smaller ones, and nearly twenty transports, under the control of Lieutenant Watson Smith. These vessels passed out of the Mississippi on a swift current, through a broad cut in the levee, at the mouth of the tortuous bayou leading to Moon Lake, and a fearful voyage they had until the power of the redundant waters was modified by diffusion over the swamps. They swept among lofty and overhanging forest-trees, that demolished smoke-stacks and nearly all besides above the decks; and everywhere fallen and submerged trees, and sharp and difficult turns in the channel, were
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