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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 218 12 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 170 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 120 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 115 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 110 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 108 12 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 106 10 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 81 5 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 65 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 53 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 13, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Kirby Smith or search for Kirby Smith in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

not a quorum in attendance in either branch of Congress of Representatives a letter was read by the Clerk from Hon. Thos. S. Bocock. Speaker, who was contained from the House on account of clamping illness in his family. In consequences of the absence of a quorum the message of the President was of a rebel. On the cab of the roll the following members answered to their tamer. Messrs. Alrington, Ayer, Baldwin. Perksin. Botaler, Reyes, Breckinridge, Dodgers, Waltz, Barnett, Stambilke, Clapp, Clark, Collier, Couram, Cook, Creckott, Currin, Carry, Davis, Elliott, Palrowe, Foote, Garnett, Gartrell, Goode, Graham, Henly, Harris, Heiskell, Hilton, Hodge, Holt, Johnson, Jones, Kenner, Lewis, Lyons, McDowell, McLean, Menees, Miles, Moore, Perkins, Ross, Russell, Sexton, Smith of Va, Staples, Smith, Texas, Vest, and Wright of Texas. In the Senate the following members were pick out. Messrs, Barnwell, Burnett, Clark, Dortch, Don, Hunter, Maxwell, Semmes, Wigfall, and Yancey.
teresting, though it was purely abstract and theoretical, and no views of particular novelty were brought forward on either side. The strength of the Two Armies at Murfreesboro'. The Knoxville Register says that our forces reduced by Lt. Gen. Smith's corps being sent to Mississippi did not, in the battle of Murfreesboro', exceed 30,000, while the enemy numbered over 50,000. A letter to the Cincinnati Gazette shows that the enemy knew this fact. It says. It had been ascertained tll arms. On the 24th of December it had been depleted by the detachment of a portion of Forrest's Cavalry, sent to cut Grant's communication; of Morgan's cavalry, pushed out to cut our own communication; and of one division, say 5,000 men, of Kirby Smith's corps, which were ordered to reinforce the rebel army of Mississippi. All together, say 10,000 men. It now seemed opportune to strike. It was unfortunate that the Cumberland river was almost hopelessly unnavigable, so that it was of no pos