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Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 230 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 200 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 162 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 114 6 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 101 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 87 9 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 84 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 70 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 58 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 55 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for W. F. Smith or search for W. F. Smith in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 14: movements of the Army of the Potomac.--the Monitor and Merrimack. (search)
s occupied by General Keyes on the night of the 4th of April. across the Peninsula fails into the James River. In front of these lines McClellan's continually augmenting army remained a month, engaged in the tedious operations of a regular siege, under t he direction of General Fitz John Porter, casting up intrenchments, skirmishing frequently, and on one occasion making a reconnoissance in force, which resulted in an engagement disastrous to the Nationals. This was by the division of General Smith of the Fourth Corps, who attacked the Confederates at Dam No. 1, on the Warwick April 16, 1862. between the mills of Lee a nd Winn. The movement was gallantly made, but failed. The vanguard of the Nationals (composed of four Vermont companies, who had waded the stream, waist deep, under cover of the cannon of Ayre's battery, and who were re-enforced by eight other companies) was driven back across the river Among the really brave men who fell at this time was private William Scott,
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 15: the Army of the Potomac on the Virginia Peninsula. (search)
own road, was impatient to move forward, but the way was blocked by Smith's division. Therefore he sought and obtained leave of Heintzelman d on the Hampton or Warwick road; and in the mean time Sumner, with Smith's division, moved on to the point where Stoneman was halting, at fied forward along the Hampton road, and took position on the left of Smith's at near midnight. Rain was then falling copiously, and the roads fully engaged in his flank movement. He had been dispatched by General Smith at an early hour, with about twenty-five hundred men, These estly called for re-enforcements, but they did not come. Twice General Smith had been ordered to send them, and each time the order was counth a loss of over five hundred men. Hancock held his position until Smith sent re-enforcements, by order of McClellan, who had arrived near tpen a communication with Franklin, at the head of York, followed by Smith's division, on the most direct road to Richmond, by way of New Kent
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 18: Lee's invasion of Maryland, and his retreat toward Richmond. (search)
into a division, under General Gregg, and served throughout the campaigns in Virginia under Stoneman, Pleasanton, and Sheridan. A portrait of the gallant Bayard, and a picture of the Bayard Badge, will be found in the third volume of this work. Smith's corps, twenty-one thousand strong, was near and fresh, and had not been much engaged in the battle throughout the day. The army signal-telegraph was used with great effect on the left that day. Its lines extended from Burnside's Headquartersooks, and Newton were named for ignominious dismissal from the service, and Generals Franklin, W. F. Smith, Cochran, and Ferrero, and Lieutenant-Colonel J. H. Taylor, were to be relieved from duty in the Army of the Potomac. Generals Franklin and Smith, without the knowledge of Burnside, wrote a joint letter to the President on the 21st of December, expressing their belief that Burnside's plan of campaign could not succeed, and substantially recommending that of McClellan, by the James River an