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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 14 2 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 6 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 5 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 5 1 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. 4 2 Browse Search
Caroline E. Whitcomb, History of the Second Massachusetts Battery of Light Artillery (Nims' Battery): 1861-1865, compiled from records of the Rebellion, official reports, diaries and rosters 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 2 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Spaulding or search for Spaulding in all documents.

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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 14: the Peninsular campaign begun; Yorktown (search)
on, however, learned to prize him for his pluck and energy that came out in battle and on an active campaign. In the fight he was a capital leader, very cool and selfpossessed. The greater part of my brigade found good accommodations on the Spaulding, a transport ship where our men could be well distributed and find the rest they coveted. They were much interested to see for the first time the lower Potomac and catch a glimpse of Mount Vernon as we steamed down the broadening river. Persolan and sympathized with his disappointments, but had misgivings when I heard the words, a partial siege at Yorktown For a short time while we were waiting for men and material that belonged to our division to come by other steamers than the Spaulding, the days were mainly spent in constructing a log road from Ship Point to Yorktown. Indeed, after the first cold and drenching rain, we discovered that that whole vicinage was underlaid with sinking sand. We constantly beheld whole fields of
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 20: General Burnside assumes command of the army of the Potomac (search)
ich fretted Burnside would be amusing, were it not so serious a matter. Major Spaulding, in charge of the large pontoon train, took up his bridges at Harper's Fer the office Woodbury told him he must see Halleck first; that conference sent Spaulding into depot and camp near Anacostia. Burnside, the 15th, called for his promised bridges by a telegram to Halleck; Spaulding then received an order to send one train by land and forty boats by water; the boats which went by water were sent of wagons or mules. They were there helpless ten miles away from Burnside. Major Spaulding at Anacostia at last secured sufficient transportation, and the 19th in thrvelous stretch of charity to impute it to mere bungling. Had Woodbury and Spaulding in the outset been properly instructed by Halleck, those bridges would have been near at hand the 17th on our arrival. Spaulding would have reported to Sumner at once and in less than an hour would have been pushing out his boats from our fr