hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 14 2 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 6 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 5 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 5 1 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. 4 2 Browse Search
Caroline E. Whitcomb, History of the Second Massachusetts Battery of Light Artillery (Nims' Battery): 1861-1865, compiled from records of the Rebellion, official reports, diaries and rosters 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 2 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 14.. You can also browse the collection for Spaulding or search for Spaulding in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

's side from George Blanchard, the first permanent settler in that part of Medford now called Wellington. Her father was for many years the sexton of the First Trinitarian Church of Medford, and in childhood and youth she attended that church, but in April, 1867, she united, on confession of faith, with the Mystic (Congregational) Church; thereafter she was devoted to its interests and benevolences. In her young womanhood she was forewoman in the cloak-making department of the store of Spaulding, Hay and Wales of Boston. Later she bought the millinery business formerly conducted by Mrs. Cameron in Usher's Building, High street, Medford. She continued this occupation until failing health necessitated giving up business activity. She was small and alert, and even after ill health and the burden of years had aged her, quick of motion and repartee. She was much interested in local history, and as regularly as her health permitted attended the meetings of the Medford Historical S
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 14., The millers' dwelling beside the Mystic. (search)
not the toll house as stated. The toll house stood near the Nunnery grounds, full one-half mile or more nearer Boston. When I was a boy, my people lived on the turnpike near Peck's hat factory; at that time the toll house was occupied by a Mr. Spaulding, who was not only the toll gatherer but attended to the repairs on the road. I knew Mr. Spaulding and also his boys; later a Mr. Perkins lived in the toll house, and was toll gatherer and road repairer. I was also acquainted with the occupMr. Spaulding and also his boys; later a Mr. Perkins lived in the toll house, and was toll gatherer and road repairer. I was also acquainted with the occupants of the old mill house. About the year 1840 it was occupied by a Mr. Woodbridge, and I attended school with his boys on Back (Union) street. I also knew the Cutter family when they lived in the old house, and I can safely assert that the old mill house as shown in connection with Mr. Swan's sketch was not the toll house. Another error is, in leading one to infer from the legend Ten Hill Farm, first residence of Governor Winthrop, 1630 that the plot of land near the river was the farm a