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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 26 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 12 0 Browse Search
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 12 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 8 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 15, 1864., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 24, 1860., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 22, 1862., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Organization of the two governments. (search)
or Joseph A. Gilmore (1863-5) New Jersey Governor Charles S. Olden (1860-3) Governor Joel Parker (1863-6) New York Governor Edwin D. Morgan (1859-63) Governor Horatio Seymour (1863-5) Governor Reuben E. Fenton (1865-9) Ohio Governor William Dennison (1860-2) Governor David Tod (1862-4) Governor John Brough (1864-5) Oregon Governor John Whittaker (1859-62) Governor Addison C. Gibbs (1862-6) Pennsylvania Governor Andrew G. Curtin (1861-7) Rhode Island Governor William Sprague (1860-1) Governor John R. Bartlett, acting (1861-2) Governor William C. Cozzens, acting (1863) Governor James Y. Smith (1863-5) Vermont Governor Erastus Fairbanks (1860-1) Governor Frederic Holbrook (1861-3) Governor J. Gregory Smith (1863-5) West Virginia (admitted 1863) Provisional Governor Francis H. Peirpoint (1861-3) Governor Arthur I. Boreman (1863-9) Wisconsin Governor Alexander W. Randall (1857-61) Governor Loui
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 8: attitude of the Border Slave-labor States, and of the Free-labor States. (search)
ts were intimately connected with the States in which insurrections had commenced, yet no considerations of self-interest could allure her people from their love of the Union and allegiance to the National Government. Her youthful Governor (William Sprague), anxious for peace and union, recommended, in his message to the Legislature of Rhode Island, the repeal of the Personal Liberty Act on its statute-book, not from fear or cowardice, he said, but from a brave determination, in the face of tht against them a sword in the hands of her Governor and others, that performed brave deeds in the cause of our nationality. In the remaining New England States, namely, New Hampshire, Vermont, and Connecticut, nothing specially noteworthy William Sprague. was done in relation to the secession movement, before the insurgents commenced actual war, in April; but in the great State of New York, whose population was then nearly three millions nine hundred thousand, and whose chief city was the c
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 16: Secession of Virginia and North Carolina declared.--seizure of Harper's Ferry and Gosport Navy Yard.--the first troops in Washington for its defense. (search)
olonel Packard and his regiment. The Eighth, under Colonel Munroe, accompanied by the General, departed for Washington on the evening train. Rhode Island and Connecticut, through which these troops passed, were in a blaze of excitement. Governor Sprague, of the former State, had promptly tendered to the Government the services of a thousand infantry and a battalion of artillery, and called the Legislature together on the 17th. That body promptly provided for the State's quota, and approprion; and the First Regiment of Infantry, twelve hundred strong, under Colonel Burnside, was ready to move. It was Rhode Island Marine Artillery. composed of many of the wealthier citizens of the State, and was accompanied to Washington by Governor Sprague, as Commander-in-chief of the forces of Rhode Island. Governor Buckingham, of Connecticut, whose labors throughout the war were unceasing and of vast importance, responded to the President's call for troops by issuing a proclamation on t
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 25: the battle of Bull's Run, (search)
In March, 1862, the bodies of Slocum, Ballou, and Captain Tower, of the same regiment (the latter was killed at the beginning of the battle), were disinterred and conveyed to Rhode Island. When their remains reached New York, General Sandford detailed the Sixty-ninth, Seventy-first, and Thirty-seventh New York Regiments to act as an escort. Porter was next in rank to Hunter, but his position was such, with his brigade, that the battle was directed by Burnside, who was ably assisted by Colonel Sprague, the youthful Governor of Rhode Island, who took the immediate command of the troops from his State. The conflict had been going on for about an hour, and the result was doubtful, when Porter came up and poured a heavy fire upon Evans's left, which made his whole column waver and bend. Just then a strong force was seen coming over a ridge, in the direction of Bull's Run, to the assistance of the Nationals, and the head of Heintzelman's division, which had not reached the ford above
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 8: Civil affairs in 1863.--military operations between the Mountains and the Mississippi River. (search)
son, Thomas H. Hicks. Massachusetts.--Charles Sumner, Henry Wilson. Michigan.--Zachary Chandler, Jacob M. Howard. Minnesota.--Alexander Ramsay, M. S. Wilkinson. Missouri.--B. Gratz Brown, J. B. Henderson. New Hampshire.--John P. Hale, Daniel Clarke. Yew Jersey.--William Wright, John C. Ten Eyck. New York.--Edwin D. Morgan, Ira Harris. Ohio.--Benjamin F. Wade, John Sherman. Oregon.--Benjamin F. Harding, G. W. Nesmith. Pennsylvania.--Charles R. Buckalew, Edward Cowan. Rhode Island.--William Sprague, Henry B. Anthony. Vermont.--Solomon Foot, Jacob Collamer. Virginia.--John S. Carlile. West Virginia.--Waitman T. Willey, P. G. Van Winkle. Wisconsin.--James R. Doolittle, Timothy O. Howe. Hannibal Hamlin, Vice-President of the Republic and President of the Senate. House of Representatives. California.--Thomas B. Shannon, William Higbee, Cornelius Cole. Connecticut.--Henry C. Deming, James E. English, Augustus Brandegee, John H. Hubbard. Delaware.--Nathaniel B. Smithers. Illinoi
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 14: Sherman's campaign in Georgia. (search)
f the roads leading from Atlanta to Decatur, which did great execution on the 22d of July, as it appeared when the writer sketched it, in May, 1866. it was in the woods seen in front of it, and not more than eighty rods distant from it, that McPherson was killed. Here was the place of some of the heaviest fighting in the battle of Atlanta. Augusta, engaged in destroying the railway there, attempted to capture McPherson's wagon-train at the former town. But Colonel (afterward General) Sprague, in command there, so skillfully guarded the wagons that he succeeded in sending all but three of them out of the reach of danger. The lull in the battle was brief. The Confederates soon charged up the railway and main Decatur road, scattering an advanced regiment acting as pickets, and capturing its two guns in battery at the foot of a tall pine-tree, used as a signal station. This station was for the purpose of directing the fire of the Nationals on the Confederate army, the countr
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 16: career of the Anglo-Confederate pirates.--closing of the Port of Mobile — political affairs. (search)
hearts of the loyal millions. In that message the President urged the House of Representatives to concur with the Senate in adopting a Thirteenth Amendment of the National Constitution, for prohibiting slavery in the Republic forever. The Senate had adopted it April 8, 1864. at the preceding session by the strong vote of thirty-eight to six. The following was the vote: yeas.--Maine--Fessenden, Morrill; Yew Hampshire, Clark, Hall; Massachusetts--Sumner, Wilson; Rhode Island--Anthony, Sprague; Connecticut--Dixon, Foster; Vermont--Collamer, Foot: New York, Harris, Morgan; New Jersey, Tenyck; Pennsylvania--Cowan; Maryland, Reverdy Johnson; West Virginia--Van Winkle, Willey; Ohio--Sherman, Wade; Indiana--Lane; Illinois--Trumbull; Missouri--Brown, Henderson; Michiyan--Chandler, Howard; Iowa--Grimes, Harlan; Wisconsin--Doolittle, Howe; Minnesota--Ramsay, Wilkinson; Kansas--Lane, Pomeroy; Oregon--Harding, Nesmith; California--Conness.--38. Only two of these affirmative votes were D
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 22: prisoners.-benevolent operations during the War.--readjustment of National affairs.--conclusion. (search)
y member of the Senate was present, and voted. Thirty-five pronounced the President guilty, and nineteen declared him not guilty. He escaped legal conviction by one vote. The vote of the Senate was as follows:-- For Conviction--Messrs. Anthony, Cameron, Cattell, Chandler, Cole, Conkling, Conness, Corbett, Cragin, Drake, Edmunds, Ferry, Frelinghuysen, Harlan, Howard, Howe, Morgan, Morrill of Vermont, Morrill of Maine, Morton, Nye, Patterson of New Hampshire, Pomeroy, Ramsey, Sherman, Sprague, Stewart, Sumner, Thayer, Tipton, Wade, Willey, Williams, Wilson and Yates. These were all Republicans. For Acquittal--Messrs. Bayard, Buckalew, Davis, Dixon, Doolittle, Fessenden, Fowler, Grimes, Henderson, Hendricks, Johnson, McCreery, Norton, Patterson of Tennessee, Ross, Saulsbury, Trumbull, Van Winkle and Vickers. Eight of these, namely: Bayard, Buckalew, Davis, Hendricks, Johnson, McCreery, Saulsbury and Vickers, were elected to the Senate as Democrats. The remainder were electe
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 55: operations of the Mississippi Squadron in the latter part of 1864 and in 1865. (search)
ters Mates, C. J. Dananda, A. H. Lewis and W. H. Corcy; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, J. J. MeElhany; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Edw. D. Hayden. Hospital-ship Red Rover. Acting-Ensigns, Charles King and J. J. Irwin; Fleet-Surgeon, Ninian Pinkney; Passed-Assistant Surgeon, J. S. Knight; Acting-Assistant Surgeons, G. H. Bixby and J. F. Field; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, A. W. Pearson; Acting-Master's Mate, R. G. Van Ness; Engineers: Acting-Chief, Wm. J. Buffinton; Acting-First-Assistant, Wm. Sprague; Acting-Second-Assistant, W. M. Fletcher; Acting-Third-Assistants, W. H. Vanwert and J. T. English; Acting-Carpenter, Harlow Kinney. Tug Fern. Acting-Ensign, John M. Kelly; Acting-Master's Mate, Jacob Bomgarnar; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistant, John Reed; Acting-Third-Assistant, A. K. Porter. Tug Mistletoe. Acting-Ensign, Janes L. Lingley; Acting-Master's Mate, John Thompson; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistant, D. S. Miller; Acting-Third-Assistant, Allison Haywood. Tug M
orgia, Alabama, and other Southern States, began to clamor and shout for Secession. They seemed so absorbingly intent on getting, for once, on the stronger side, that they forgot the controlling fact that the side on which God is has always at last the majority. The early State Elections of 1860 had not been favorable to the Republicans. They had begun by carrying New Hampshire by 4,443--a satisfactory majority; but were next beaten in Rhode Island--an independent ticket, headed by William Sprague for Governor, carrying the State over theirs, by 1,460 majority. In Connecticut, Gov. Buckingham had been re-elected by barely 541 majority, in nearly 80,000 votes — the heaviest poll ever had there at a State Election. It was evident that harmony at Charleston would have rendered the election of a Democratic President morally certain. But, after the disruption there, things were bravely altered. Maine, early in September, elected a Republican Governor by 18,091 majority; Vermont di
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