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James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 3 3 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 3 3 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 1 1 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 1 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 1 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 29, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 11, 1864., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Just hear! About quills and paper on the floor; forming classes; drinking in the entry (cold water, mind you); giving leave to speak; recess-bell, etc., etc. You are tired, I see, says Gilpin, so am I, and I spare you. I have just been hearing a class of little girls recite, and telling them a fairy story which I had to spin out as it went along, beginning with once upon a time there was, etc., in the good old-fashioned way of stories. Recently I have been reading the life of Madame de Stael and Corinne. I have felt an intense sympathy with many parts of that book, with many parts of her character. But in America feelings vehement and absorbing like hers become still more deep, morbid, and impassioned by the constant habits of selfgovernment which the rigid forms of our society demand. They are repressed, and they burn inward till they burn the very soul, leaving only dust and ashes. It seems to me the intensity with which my mind has thought and felt on every subject
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, Woman's rights and woman's duties (1866) (search)
o govern the country. Woman's brain, if our cause rests on a sound and enduring basis, is to be as prompt and influential in establishing the future as man's. There have been but five or six times in the history of France when fashion in the salons of Paris would not have unseated any king; yet woman never had a vote. When Napoleon banished Madame de Stail from France, he acknowledged the power of the throne she filled, and that his could not withstand her influence. If the genius of Madame de Stael is the representative to any extent of the force that woman can wield in modern society, then this cause rests upon you first, and almost last upon fashion. A sneer at woman's making her living, a lack of recognition because she earns her bread, just that flavor of unfashionableness which work stamps upon woman,--in that impalpable, almost invisible, indescribable power, is the magic that binds Albany in the chains of male legislation. The legislator votes from the streets of New Yo
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Lydia Maria child. (search)
irk of mistimed levity on their faces, and one feels an irresistible impulse to insert in their very curly hair the twisted papers employed in the game of Genteel lady, always Genteel, in the Girl's own book. The History of woman appeared in 1832, as one of a series projected by Carter & Hendee, of which Mrs. Child was to be the editor, but which was interrupted at the fifth volume by the failure of the publishers. She compiled for this the Biographies of good wives, the Memoirs of Madame De Stael and Madame Roland, those of Lady Russell and Madame Guion, and the two volumes of Woman. All these aimed at a popular, not a profound, treatment. She was, perhaps, too good a compiler, showing in such work the traits of her brother's mind, and carefully excluding all those airy flights and bold speculations which afterwards seemed her favorite element. The History of woman, for instance, was a mere assemblage of facts, beginning and ending abruptly, and with no glimpse of any leading
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Margaret Fuller Ossoli. (search)
eat attractions for young people of talent. It offers something of that atmosphere of culture for which such persons yearn,--tinged, perhaps, with a little narrowness and constraint. She met there in girlhood the same persons who were afterwards to be her literary friends, co-laborers, and even biographers. It was a stimulating and rather perilous position, for she found herself among a circle of highly cultivated young men, with no equal female companion; although she read Locke and Madame de Stael with Lydia Maria Francis, afterwards better known as Mrs. Child. Carlyle had just called attention to the rich stores of German literature; all her friends were exploring them, and some had just returned from the German universities. She had the college library at command, and she had that-vast and omnivorous appetite for books which is the most common sign of literary talent in men, but is for some reason exceedingly rare among women. At least I have known but two young girls whose
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Mrs. Elizabeth Cady Stanton. (search)
a fruit-orchard, jar the ripe and laden trees one after another, and not a greater shower of plums, cherries, and pomegranates will fall about your head, than the witticisms, anecdotes, and repartees which this bounteous woman sheds down in her table-talk. House-keeping and babies, free trade and temperance, woman's suffrage and the white male citizen, --these are her favorite themes. Many a person, on spending a delightful evening in her society, has gone away, saying,, Well, that is Madam de Stael alive again. Never a human being had a kindlier nature than Mrs. Stanton's. Pity is her chief vice; charity, her besetting sin. She has not the heart to see a chicken killed, or a child punished. If robbed of all her property, she could not endure to have sentence passed on the thief. When a wretch does wrong, she is apt to think his act not so much his own fault, as the fault of the law under which he lives. A judge punishes the offender, and lets the law go uncondemned; but this
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 11: Paris.—its schools.—January and February, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
Baptiste Dumas, a celebrated chemist and author of works on his specialty was born July 14, 1800. He was minister of agriculture and commerce, 1850-1851, and has held other public offices. He was elected, Dec. 1875, member of the French Academy as successor of Guizot. His efforts have been directed to the promotion of scientific agriculture. on chemistry, and Fauriel Claude Charles Fauriel, 1772-1844. He was a nephew of the Abbe Sieyes; the intimate friend of Guizot, Manzoni, and Madame de Stael; a professor of foreign literature, taking, in 1830, a chair which the Duc de Broglie, then Minister of Public Instruction, had created for him; and a writer upon historical and literary subjects. on Spanish literature. I understood very little of what either said. The former, a very neat gentlemanly person, was talking and experimenting to a large audience, of several hundred. Fauriel, rather an elderly gentleman, say fifty-five or sixty, considered in his lecture the remains of the
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 12: Paris.—Society and the courts.—March to May, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
usion. It was very soon adjourned. After this went to view the Palais de laElysee Bourbon,—the palace which Murat with his wife, the sister of Bonaparte, occupied and adorned, and in which Bonaparte spent the last days of his reign. I was shown the chamber in which he slept, and in which he made his last abdication. This morning I called, with Mr. Ticknor, on the Duc de Broglie, 1785-1870. He descended from an ancient family of Piedmontese origin, and married the only daughter of Madame de Stael. His honorable efforts for the abolition of slavery deserve commemoration. In politics he affiliated with Guizot. He was for a time, under Louis Philippe, Minister of Public Instruction or of Foreign Affairs. His son Albert, born in 1821, has had a conspicuous place in recent French history. the late prime-minister of France. He is emphatically a gentleman,—his manners smooth and even, without any thing particularly striking, and yet calculated to inspire respect. He is, perhaps,
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 15: the Circuits.—Visits in England and Scotland.—August to October, 1838.—age, 27. (search)
t interest to me, inasmuch as they illustrated the character of this wonderful man, and as they brought out much personal anecdote. Nothing was discussed, and no opinions expressed, except about individuals; and of these he expressed himself with the greatest freedom. The late Duke of Gloucester he styled a d—d bore and fool, and told an odd story of the duke extracting at table from Wilberforce, by means of blunt and princely impertinence, the account of Necker offering his daughter, Madame de Stael, in marriage to Pitt. He also mentioned that, at the time Lord Chatham made his celebrated speech against employing Indians, Speech of Nov. 18, 1777, in reply to Lord Suffolk, who had justified the use of all the means which God and Nature put into our hands. Goodrich's Select British Eloquence, p. 138. Lord Bute had in his possession letters from Chatham, when William Pitt, in which he boasted of employing Indians successfully, and exclaimed, Sing lo Poean! by means of Indians we
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 25: service for Crawford.—The Somers Mutiny.—The nation's duty as to slavery.—1843.—Age, 32. (search)
nts and elevated tastes,—preserving his purity of heart amidst all the attractions of London life. I do not think Mary is better; she is very cold and pale. She is always charmed by kindness, and does not forget yours. Choate is entirely uncommitted on the subject of international copyright. He has never looked at it; and if he sees his way clear to be its advocate, he will enter into it. He asked me to state to him, in a few words, the arguments on both sides. I thought of Madame de Stael and Fichte,— Donnez moi vos idees en dix mots. I did it; and he muses still. To Dr. Lieber he wrote, Sept. 13, 1843:— I have only a moment for a single line. The sun is bright; the day is fair. The Orpheus arrived this morning; so did Mackenzie. I have been to ask the latter to join me in dining with Longfellow, and now go to superintend the landing of the former. At the Inglises' last night we talked of you, and listened to beautiful music, which Miss Harper very much <
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 41: search for health.—journey to Europe.—continued disability.—1857-1858. (search)
the Isola Bella and Lesa, the home of Manzoni, and went on by railway from Arona to Turin, then the capital of Piedmont, a city he had not before visited. Here he looked wistfully towards the south, but turning back, by mule or carriage, traversed the Val d'aosta, and crossed the Great St. Bernard, passing a night at the Hospice, and then by way of Martigny, Tete Noire, and Chamouni, reached Geneva, September 5. Here he was interested in the associations of Voltaire, Calvin, Rousseau, Madame de Stael, and Byron. At Lausanne he sought the garden of the Hotel Gibbon, to look upon the view that Gibbon looked upon; the cathedral, and also the library, where he traced out the manuscripts of La Harpe prepared for his pupil the Emperor Alexander. Then, by way of Lake Neuchatel, he went on to Basle and Heidelberg, where he called on his old friends Grosch and Mittermaier, from whom he received a cordial, kind, and most friendly welcome. To the latter he wrote as he left the town a letter
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