hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 3 3 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 3 3 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 1 1 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 1 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 1 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 29, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 11, 1864., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Stael or search for Stael in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, Woman's rights and woman's duties (1866) (search)
o govern the country. Woman's brain, if our cause rests on a sound and enduring basis, is to be as prompt and influential in establishing the future as man's. There have been but five or six times in the history of France when fashion in the salons of Paris would not have unseated any king; yet woman never had a vote. When Napoleon banished Madame de Stail from France, he acknowledged the power of the throne she filled, and that his could not withstand her influence. If the genius of Madame de Stael is the representative to any extent of the force that woman can wield in modern society, then this cause rests upon you first, and almost last upon fashion. A sneer at woman's making her living, a lack of recognition because she earns her bread, just that flavor of unfashionableness which work stamps upon woman,--in that impalpable, almost invisible, indescribable power, is the magic that binds Albany in the chains of male legislation. The legislator votes from the streets of New Yo