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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 72 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley. You can also browse the collection for Pasargadae Stanley or search for Pasargadae Stanley in all documents.

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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.15 (search)
adocio, sportsman, and warrior, whose romances first puzzled, and then amused, Stanley, until he learned that a severe wound, and a sun-stroke, had produced these obthat there had been no delay. This foresight was peculiarly characteristic of Stanley. On the return march, he could not get permission to send an advance courier of chaff between a colonel and captain generated wrath and a prospective duel; Stanley's mediation was accepted; reconciliation, champagne, and — Suez at last; but only to face five days of quarantine! Stanley manages to get a long despatch ashore, to his friend in the telegraph office. It is before all the others, and is hurrbetween Alexandria and Malta breaks, and for weeks not another word can pass! Stanley's despatch brings to London the only news of Theodore's overthrow. Surprise, nciations of the Herald and its imposture, --then conviction, and acceptance! Stanley had won his place in the world's front rank of correspondents! He notes in hi
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.16 (search)
ting him, and getting the first intelligence, Stanley is to go to Aden, and use his discretion as t news of Livingstone, and scant hope of any! Stanley critically examines Aden; notes its unfortifiy thousand people, who roared their vivas. Stanley was in the prime of his powers, and these powgossa the next morning at 6 A. M. And here Stanley witnessed a rising of the people, proud and pery thundered, and, when the smoke dispersed, Stanley saw the soldiers had approached nearer. The g passages, however, will suffice to show how Stanley's whole being throbbed with energy, and with Into this many-branched search for knowledge Stanley now threw himself. He carried out the whole inaugurated as Kings of Persia. From Pasargadae Stanley rides to Persepolis, and here he lingersof milk. Early the next morning, July 1st, Stanley rode away, after cutting his name deep on theing to him. This was the man, to find whom Stanley is to plunge into an unknown tropical Contine[19 more...]
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.17 (search)
Chapter XIII the finding of Livingstone in his book, How I found Livingstone, Stanley has told that story at length. What here follows is arranged from material hitherto unpublished, and is designed to give the main thread of events, to supply some fuller illustration of his intercourse with Livingstone, and his final estimate of him, and, especially, both in this, and in his later explorations, to show from his private Journal something of the workings of his own heart and mind, in the solitude of Africa. Though fifteen months had elapsed since I had received my commission, no news of Livingstone had been heard by any mortal at Zanzibar. According to one, he was dead; and, according to another, he was lost; while still another hazarded the conviction that he had attached himself to an African princess, and had, in fact, settled down. There was no letter for me from Mr. Bennett, confirming his verbal order to go and search for the traveller; and no one at Zanzibar was pre