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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 3 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Stephen, James 1759-1832 (search)
Stephen, James 1759-1832 Author; born in Poole, England, in 1759; received a fair education and became a barrister; was a member of Parliament, and later was made under secretary for the colonies. He was the author of American arguments on neutral rights; Speech in the House of Commons on the overtures of the American government, etc. He died in Bath, England, Oct. 10, 1832. Stephens, Alexander Hamilton
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Trenton, battle of (search)
ng enough to attack this force, and at twilight on Christmas night he had about 2,000 men on the shore of the Delaware at McConkey's Ferry (afterwards Taylorsville), a few miles above Trenton, preparing to cross the river. He rightly believed that the Germans, after the usual carouse of the Christmas festival, would be peculiarly exposed to a surprise, and he prepared to fall upon them before daylight on the morning of the 26th. With him were Generals Stirling, Greene, Sullivan, Mercer, Stephen, and Map of the battle of Trenton. Knox, commanding the artillery. Arrangements were made for a similar movement against the cantonments below Trenton, the command of which was assigned to General Gates; but that officer, jealous of Washington, and in imitation of General Lee, with wilful disobedience refused the duty, and turning his back on Washington, rode on towards Baltimore to intrigue among Congressmen against Gen. Philip Schuyler (q. v.). Ice was forming in the Delaware, and its
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 9: (search)
Villiers', where we always enjoy ourselves, and where we always meet remarkable people. Today there was a Mr. Lewis, Afterwards Sir George Cornewall Lewis. evidently a very scholar-like person; Sir Edmund Head; Henry Taylor, the poet; and Mr. Stephen, Afterwards Sir James Stephen. the real head of the Colonial Office, an uncommon man, son of Wilberforce's brother-in-law, the author of War in Disguise. He is, I apprehend, very orthodox, and, what is better, very conscientious. He told Sir James Stephen. the real head of the Colonial Office, an uncommon man, son of Wilberforce's brother-in-law, the author of War in Disguise. He is, I apprehend, very orthodox, and, what is better, very conscientious. He told me that his father wrote the Frauds of Neutral Flags—which so annoyed us Americans, and brought out Mr. Madison in replywholly from the relations of the subject to the slave-trade; his purpose being to resist all attempts on our part, or on the part of any other nation, to stop the English right—or practice—of search, because without that he was persuaded the slave-trade could never be practically and entirely abolished. The present state of things seems to justify his fears, if not his doctri<