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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
missioners to Richmond, I heard two of them—Mr. Stephens and Mr. Hunter—discuss the incidents of thehe United States, on the one hand, and Alexander H. Stephens, Robert M. T. Hunter and John A. CampbDavis on the 8th of January, appointed Alexander H. Stephens, Robert M. T. Hunter and John A. Campbe subject. Very respectfully yours, Alexander H. Stephens, J. A. Campbell, R. M. T. Hunter. ries as to former congressional associates, Mr. Stephens introduced the business of the meeting by istment, etc. Mr. Lincoln at once understood Mr. Stephens as referring to what Mr. Blair had suggesteajority of the Northern people. Then, said Mr. Stephens, could not both parties in our contest comen view for effecting the proposed purpose. Mr. Stephens replied that he had no fixed plan, but thernfiscated property or providing indemnity. Mr. Stephens inquired what would be the status of that pnd Mr. Seward returned to Washington, and Messrs. Stephens, Hunter and Campbell went back to City Po[16 more...]<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The trials and trial of Jefferson Davis. (search)
selected as a person sharp enough to be Mr. Davis' jailor, and he reported to General Halleck for the purpose. (121 War of Rebellion, p. 560.) On the 19th of May the steamer Clyde reached Fortress Monroe, having aboard Mr. Davis and family, Mr. Stephens, Mr. Reagan, Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Clay, Major-General Joseph Wheeler and staff, Colonels Johnston and Lubbock, and Mr. Burton N. Harrison, besides one or two subaltern officers. The safeguards were at once augmented by placing a gunboat on each side of the Clyde. Stephens and Reagan were sent to Fort Warren; Wheeler and staff, Johnston and Lubbock, to Fort Delaware, and Harrison to Washington, while the women and children were sent back South. Fearing that Halleck might not be harsh enough or Miles sharp enough for the occasion, Mr. Stanton sent the Assistant Secretary of War, Mr. C. A. Dana, to the fort to supervise the details of the incarceration of the two prisoners, Davis and Clay. He was present on the 22d of June, when the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
Davis on the 8th of January, appointed Alexander H. Stephens, Robert M. T. Hunter and John A. Campbners having assented to this understanding, Mr. Stephens repeated his inquiry, and in reply Mr. Lincstment, etc. Mr. Lincoln at once understood Mr. Stephens as referring to what Mr. Blair had suggestestponed until the general ideas advanced by Mr. Stephens might be more fully developed. There was aeneral acquiescence in this suggestion, and Mr. Stephens proceeded to elaborate his views more fullyntained on that basis. He then inquired of Mr. Stephens as to the details of the plan he had in view for effecting the proposed purpose. Mr. Stephens replied that he had no fixed plan, but there wernfiscated property or providing indemnity. Mr. Stephens inquired what would be the status of that pnd Mr. Seward returned to Washington, and Messrs. Stephens, Hunter and Campbell went back to City Pothe commissioners and from the narrative of Mr. Stephens published soon after the termination of the[14 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.46 (search)
its service who were best qualified to write concerning its operations have published little or nothing about it. Mr. Benjamin in response to Mr. Davis's inquiries, wrote something, but not much, about the Hampton Roads conference; Mr. Hunter, Mr. Stephens, and Judge Campbell, considerably more, but on that point chiefly. I regret now that I did not take up this general subject in 1872, but all my time was then engrossed by the work and cares of life. In the absence of reliable exposition bye summer of 1861 he left the Department to become a brigadier-general. He achieved no special distinction in this role, and his fame must rest chiefly on what he said and did during his long and brilliant service in the Federal Congress. Alexander H. Stephens said of his speech of January 7, 1861, that it deserved a place by the side of that of Pericles on a like occasion. R. M. T. Hunter. Mr. Toomb's successor in the Confederate State Department after July, 1861, the Hon. Robert M. T. H
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
hurch as Hospital, 171. Sanders, Colonel C. C, 172. Saunders, Hon. Romulus M., 33. St. Paul's Church, 154. Secession, Right of, 150. Seward, W. H., his little bell, 122, 190. Sharpsburg, Battle of, 307. Sheridan, General P. H., Vandalism of, 117. Sherman, General W. T., made war hell, 107, 280. Sherry, Sergeant, 9. Shiloh, Battle of, 357. Slaves, General Cleburne's plan to put into the army, 173; Extension of territory for 18. Squirrel Level Fort, 289. Stephens, A. H., his fidelity and acumen, 185. Stuart, General J. E. B., 169; how killed, 227, 335. Surratt, Mrs., Execution of, 122. Taylor, Governor Robert L., 361. Toney, Marcus B., 193 Toombs, General Robert 346. Torpedo boats, David, 292, Holland, of C. S. Navy, 293. Thomas, L. B., 223. Tucker, Beverley, 160; Rev. Dallas, 153. Virginia, Advisory Council of War in 1861, 364; Officers of 1st Regiment infantry, 364; 26th Infantry, company G, Roll of, 210; how she supplied Marylan