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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 50 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 42 12 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 38 6 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 29 3 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 21 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 21 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 17 1 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 16 0 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 13 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for Carter L. Stevenson or search for Carter L. Stevenson in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Bragg's invasion of Kentucky. (search)
uantity of cotton in transit to the North. One week was thus occupied behind the enemy's lines, the main object of the movement being to create the impression of a general advance. On July 31st Bragg and Kirby Smith met at Chattanooga, and a joint movement into middle Tennessee was determined upon, Price and Van Dorn being left to confront Grant in northern Mississippi. On August 5th Bragg sent two of his brigades (Cleburne's and Preston Smith's) to General Smith at Knoxville. General C. L. Stevenson, with nearly nine thousand men, was ordered to watch the Federal General G. W. Morgan, who occupied Cumberland Gap. General Smith started on the 14th en route to Rogers's Gap, with 4 brigades, 6000 strong. The brigades of Preston Smith and B. J. Hill were commanded by General P. R. Cleburne, and the brigades of McCray and McNair were under command of General T. J. Churchill. General Henry Heth, with a force nearly 4000 strong, was ordered to march direct to Barboursville by way of
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Morgan's cavalry during the Bragg invasion. (search)
he mountains of eastern Kentucky. The Federal general, George W. Morgan, had evacuated Cumberland Gap, and followed by Stevenson, who had been instructed to observe and pursue him if he moved, was making his way to the Ohio. It was intended that Marshall and Morgan should intercept and arrest his march until Stevenson could overtake him and attack him in rear. The detachment under my command became immediately very actively engaged with the enemy, who, in considerable numbers, had crossedng that time the enemy progressed only thirty miles; nevertheless, John Morgan received no aid as promised him, nor did Stevenson overtake the Federal commander and force him to battle. At noon, October the 1st, Colonel Morgan received orders to wiof October. I reported to him there the next day. The town was about to be evacuated, and General Smith's entire army, Stevenson having arrived, was marching to effect a junction with Bragg. We left Lexington on the 6th, and until the 10th were em
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., East Tennessee and the campaign of Perryville. (search)
le and Chattanooga Railroad, McCook's and Crittenden's divisions were sent to Stevenson and Battle Creek. Nelson's and Wood's divisions were for the present kept onl Records, Vol. XVI., Part II., pp. 104, 122. The road from Nashville to Stevenson was completed on the 12th of July, and a train was started the next morning wcross the mountains by direct roads toward middle Tennessee. In either case, Stevenson, on the south side of a declining spur of the Cumberland Mountains reaching tmpt. The alternative was to invest him on the south side with 9000 men under Stevenson, while Smith with 12,000 should seize and hold his communications on the northdraw, which he did on the night of the 17th of September. He was pursued by Stevenson and harassed by John Morgan's cavalry, but made his way successfully through yson to the Ohio River at Greenup, where he arrived about the 2d of October. Stevenson with his division joined Kirby Smith near Frankfort about the time of my arri
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Cumberland Gap. (search)
d for defense at that point, after evacuating Cumberland Gap and removing the stores. This was just what I wanted. On the evening of the 17th of June, General Carter L. Stevenson of the Confederate forces sent Colonel J. E. Rains to cover the evacuation of Cumberland Gap, The Confederate forces covering the mountain and river passes north of Knoxville at this time were under General C. L. Stevenson, First Division, Department of East Tennessee.--editors. which had been commenced on the afternoon of that day; Rains withdrew in the night and marched toward Morristown. Unaware of that fact, at 1 o'clock on the morning of June 18th we advanced in two paral Ky. Engineers, Capt. William F. Patterson. Confederate forces.--Their composition is not stated in the Official Records. During the month of July Brig.-Gen. Carter L. Stevenson, First Division, Department of East Tennessee, was in position confronting Morgan at Cumberland Gap. The strength of this division was stated by Gene
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Chickasaw bluffs (or First Vicksburg), Miss.: December 27th, 1862--January 3d, 1863. (search)
1776. The effective strength of the expeditionary force is estimated at about 33,000 men. General Sherman says ( Official Records, Vol. XVII., Part I., p. 610) that the only real fighting was during the assault by Morgan's and Steele's divisions, and at the time of crossing the 6th Missouri, during the afternoon of December 29th, by the Second Division. The Confederate forces. Lieutenant-General John C. Pemberton. defenses of Vicksburg, Major-General Martin L. Smith, Major-General Carter L. Stevenson. Barton's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Seth M. Barton: 40th Ga., Col. Abda Johnson (w); 42d Ga., Col. R. J. Henderson; 43d Ga., Lieut.-Col. Hiram P. Bell (w); 52d Ga., Col. C. D. Phillips. Brigade loss: k, 15; w, 39 54. Vaughn's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John C. Vaughn: 79th Tenn., Col. John H. Crawford; 80th Tenn., Col. John A. Rowan; 81st Tenn.,---. Brigade loss: k, 8; w, 10 == 18. Gregg's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John Gregg: 1st Tenn.,---; 3d Tenn., Col. C. J. Clack; 10th Tenn.,---; 30th Te
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.67 (search)
ns I declined to weaken General Bragg without further orders to do so. About the 9th of December the President passed through Chattanooga on his way to Murfreesboro‘, to decide, at General Bragg's headquarters, whether the army of Tennessee or that of Arkansas should furnish the reenforcements necessary to enable the Confederacy to hold the Mississippi and its valley. He returned in two or three days and directed me to order General Bragg to send ten thousand of his men under Major-General C. L. Stevenson to report to General Pemberton. The order was given as the President's. He then set out to Mississippi, desiring me to accompany him. In Jackson, which he reached the morning of the 19th of December, he found the Legislature in session. It had been convened by Governor Pettus to bring out the remaining military resources of the State, to aid in its defense. On the 21st and 22d Mr. Davis inspected the water-batteries and land defenses of Vicksburg, which were then very extens
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The defense of Vicksburg. (search)
rs when the fire seemed to be concentrated in their particular neighborhoods. Finally the upper fleet, under Flag-Officer C. H. Davis, came down the Major-General C. L. Stevenson, C. S. A. From a photograph. river, joined the vessels that had run our batteries, put a flotilla of mortar-boats in position, and took part in the gr covering all the approaches from the south and east. The army here assembled consisted of three divisions: Bowen's on the right, Loring's in the center, and C. L. Stevenson's on the left, numbering about 18,000 men. Some slight field-works had been thrown up at favorable points. The position was naturally a strong one, on high g The river-batteries were still strong and intact, having lost none of their sea-coast guns. The troops were placed in position as I had recommended. General C. L. Stevenson's division extended from the Warrenton road on our extreme right to the railroad; General John H. Forney's division occupied the center, from the railroad
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.69 (search)
ront the ground was the most broken and most Position of Hovey's division of McClernand's Corps. From a Lithograph. In the foreground is the siege-battery; below is the wooded ravine; from left to right are seen the camps of the 34th Indiana, 29th Wisconsin, 11th Indiana., 46th Indiana, and 25th Indiana; half-way to the summit are the rifle-pits of Hovey's division, confronting Confederate works and forts on the farthest ridge, which was a part of the Confederate line held by General C. L. Stevenson. wooded, and more was to be seen without exposure. I therefore took them to Sherman's headquarters and presented them. Before starting out to look at the lines — possibly while Sherman's horse was being saddled — there were many questions asked about the late campaign, about which the North had been so imperfectly informed. There was a little knot about Sherman and around me, and I heard Sherman repeating in the most animated manner what he had said to me, when we first looked d
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Confederate forces: Lieut.-General John C. Pemberton. (search)
Rayburn. Brigade loss: Champion's Hill, w, 2; m, 1=3. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Abram Buford: 27th Ala., Col. James Jackson; 35th Ala., Col. Edward Goodwin; 54th Ala., Col. Alpheus Baker (w); 55th Ala., Col. John Snodgrass; 9th Ark., Col. Isaac L. Dunlop; 3d Ky. (4 co's), Maj. J. H. Bowman; 7th Ky., Col. Edward Crossland; 12th La., Col. T. M. Scott; Pointe Coupee (La.) Artillery, Capt. Alcide Bouanchaud. Brigade loss: Champion's Hill, k, 11; w, 49 = 60. Stevenson's division, Maj.-Gen. Carter L. Stevenson. Staff loss: Champion's Hill, k, 1. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Seth M. Barton: 40th Ga., Col. Abda Johnson, Lieut.-Col. Robert M. Young; 41st Ga., Col. William E. Curtiss; 42d Ga., Col. R. J. Henderson; 43d Ga., Col. Skidmore Harris (k), Capt. M. 5M. Grantham; 52d Ga., Col. C. D. Phillips (m), Maj. John J. Moore; Miss. Battery (Hudson's), Lieut. Milton H. Trantham; La. Battery (Pointe Coupee Artillery), Section Co. A, Lieut. John Yoist; La. Battery (Pointe Coupee Artillery), C
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 7.83 (search)
Lee. The President asked Bragg if he did not think he could spare a division of his army to reeforce Pemberton. Buildings at Murfreesboro‘. from photographs. 1. General Rosecrans's Headquarters. 2. Christian Church, used as a post chapel by the Union army. 3. Soule Female College, used as a hospital. 4. Headquarters of General Bragg; afterward of Generals Thomas and Garfield. 5. Union University, used as a hospital. Bragg assented and dispatched a division of 8000 men under Stevenson. This step was contrary to the decided opinion previously expressed to Mr. Davis by General Johnston. [See p. 473.] So well satisfied was General Bragg at having extricated his army from its perilous position in Kentucky, that he was not affected by the attacks upon him by the press for the failure of the campaign. He was cheerful, and would frequently join the staff about the camp-fire, and relate with zest incidents of his services under General Taylor in Mexico. He told how on
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