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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 50 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 42 12 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 38 6 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 29 3 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 21 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 21 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 17 1 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 16 0 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 13 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies. You can also browse the collection for Carter L. Stevenson or search for Carter L. Stevenson in all documents.

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on to Atlanta, naught but the most peremptory orders could have induced me to have left General Lee. General Johnston, in reference to the operations around Resaca, makes the following remarks: Johnston's Narrative, page 313. Major General Stevenson had early in the day, and with Lieutenant General Hood's approval, assumed the position from which he had been recalled the night before. Here he was directed by the Lieutenant General to place a field battery in a position some eighty s of the two armies, which were very close together at that point. They were finally abandoned on the night of our retreat from Resaca, simply from the fact that I found upon consultation with Colonel Beckham, my chief of artillery, and Major General Stevenson, one of my division commanders, that I had more guns than were required for the number of men in my command; and, as the order to retreat had been given, it was deemed better to yield them to the enemy than to sacrifice one or two hundre
ddition to the troops at Dalton, Polk's Army, Longstreet's Ccrps, and ten thousand men from Beauregard, were proffered for the purpose. After halting two days at Cross Roads, I decided to make provision for twenty days supply of rations in the haversacks and wagons; to order a heavy reserve of artillery to accompany the Army, in order to overcome any serious opposition by the Federal gunboats; to cross the Tennessee at or near Guntersville, and again destroy Sherman's communications, at Stevenson and Bridgeport; to move upon Thomas and Schofield, and attempt to rout and capture their Army before it could reach Nashville. I intended then to march upon that city where I would supply the Army and reinforce it, if possible, by accessions from Tennessee. I was imbued with the belief that I could accomplish this feat, afterward march northeast, pass the Cumberland river at some crossing where the gunboats, if too formidable at other points, were unable to interfere; then move into Kent
dling his troops on the 17th, whilst protecting the rear of our Army. Unfortunately, in the afternoon he was wounded and forced to leave the field. Major General Carter L. Stevenson then assumed command of Lee's Corps, and ably discharged his duties during the continuance of the retreat to and across the Tennessee river. Majorades together with Forrest's cavalry; the march was then resumed in the direction of Columbia, Stewart's Corps moving in front, followed by those of Cheatham and Stevenson. The Army bivouacked in line of battle near Duck river, on the night of the 18th. The following day, we crossed the river and proceeded on different roads leo was issued, as the ensuing circular will indicate: [no. 542.]>headquarters, Tupelo, Mississippi, January 16th, 1865. Lieutenant General Stewart, Major General Stevenson, Major General Cheatham. (Copy sent to Colonel Harvie.) If you have any troops in your command who live sufficiently near the present position of th
till long after dark, but gallantly did the rear guard, consisting of Pettus's Alabama and Cummings's Georgia brigades, the latter commanded by General Watkins, of Stevenson's Division, and under that gallant and meritorious officer, Major General C. L. Stevenson, repulse every attack. Brigadier General Chalmers with his division of cavalry covered our flanks. The cavalry of the enemy succeeded in getting in Stevenson's rear, and attacked Major General Clayton's Division about dark; but they the enemy during the evening. About 1 p. m. I was wounded while with the rear guard, but did not relinquish command of my corps till dark. Most of the details in conducting the returns from that time were arranged and executed by Major General C. L. Stevenson, to whom the Army is much indebted for his skill and gallant conduct during the day. I cannot close this report without alluding particularly to the conduct of the artillery of my corps on the 16th. Sixteen guns were lost on the lines