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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Stewart, Charles 1778-1869 (search)
Stewart, Charles 1778-1869 Naval officer; born in Philadelphia, Pa., July 28, 1778; was the youngest of eight children, and lost his father when he was two years old. At the age of thirteen he entered the merchant service as a cabin-boy, and rose rapidly to be commander of an Indiaman. In 1798 he was commissioned a lieutenant in the navy, making his first cruise with Captain Barney. In 1800 he was ap- Charles Stewart, aged eighty-six. pointed to the command of the schooner Experiment, and fought and captured the French schooner Deux Amis Sept. 1. Soon afterwards he captured the Diana (Sept. 14), besides recapturing a number of American vessels which had been taken by French privateers. In the war with Tripoli, Stewart was distinguished for skill and bravery, and was Decatur's favorite. In May, 1804, he was made master-commandant and placed in command of the frigate Essex. He was promoted to captain in 1806, and was employed in superintending the construction of gunboats
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
Milwaukee, Wis., dedicated......October, 1869 Franklin Pierce, ex-President, born 1804, dies at Concord, N. H......Oct. 8. 1869 Commercial Convention held at Louisville, Ky., 520 delegates from twenty-two States, ex-President Millard Fillmore presiding......Oct. 13, 1869 Steamboat Stonewall burned on the Mississippi below Cairo; about 200 persons perish......Oct. 27, 1869 United States branch mint at Carson City, Nev., founded 1866, begins operations......Nov. 1, 1869 Admiral Charles Stewart, born 1778, dies at Bordentown, N. J.......Nov. 6, 1869 Maj.-Gen. John Ellis Wool, born 1784, dies at Troy, N. Y.......Nov. 10, 1869 National Woman's Suffrage Convention meets in Cleveland, O. (183 delegates from sixteen States, Rev. Henry Ward Beecher president), and organizes American Woman's Suffrage Association......Nov. 24, 1869 Second session opens......Dec. 6, 1869 National Colored Labor Convention meets in Washington......Dec. 10, 1869 Wyoming gives women the
Doc. 132.--letter from Commodore Stewart. Bordentown, May 4, 1861. My dear Sir: Agreeably to your request I now furnish you with the reminiscences of a conversation which passed between Mr. John C. Calhoun and myself in the latter part of December, 1812, after the declaration of war by the Congress of the United States against Great Britain on the 18th of June previous. On the assembling of Congress, in the early part of December, I found that an important portion of the leading o which his whole life had been devoted. You see, my dear sir, I have no disposition to bury my light under a bushel, but will ever be ready to accord justice to whom justice is due. Thus in death we show the ruling passion stronger than in life, and as it is with individuals, so it is with nations — the blackest spot found in the heart is ingratitude. Accept the assurances of my regard and esteem. Charles Stewart. George W. Childs, Esq., Philadelphia. --N. Y. Evening Post, May 10.
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 5: life at camp Benton. (search)
f Observation, Poolesville, Nov. 13, 1861. Lieut. Col. Devereux, commanding. 19TH Mass. Vols. Sir:— The general commanding directs me to express to you the gratification with which he noticed the advancement in drill made by the regiment under your command, as exhibited at the review of yesterday. So much progress in so short a time gives promise of admirable results and reflects great credit upon both instructors and instructed. Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, Chas. Stewart, A. A. G. At this time there were six Harvard men in the regiment,— Maj. Henry Jackson Howe, '59; Asst. Surg. Josiah Newell Willard, '57; Capt. George Wellington Batchelder, '59; Sergt. Maj. Edgar Marshall Newcomb,‘60; First Lieut. John Hodges,. Jr., ‘61 and Charles Brooks Brown, '56. It was not an infrequent occurrence for the regimental band to include among its selections the delightful melody of Fair Harvard in their honor. The chief thing of interest, beside work, at Pool
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 26: a period of rest in camp at Falmouth. (search)
Lee had begun to move for the purpose of invading the Northern lines a second time and compelling Hooker to leave the Southern lines and recross the Potomac. Stewart and his cavalry was massed for the purpose of protecting Lee's right on his march up the valley, to furnish information, to harass the Union army and to frighten Washington. Pleasanton, with all the Union cavalry, was sent to attack Stewart. They met and one of the grandest cavalry fights known to history occurred, the consequences of which were all important. Final victory crowned the Union army, though equally claimed by the Confederates. Stewart, however, was compelled to leave thethough equally claimed by the Confederates. Stewart, however, was compelled to leave the field in haste, hotly pursued by Pleasanton, thus bringing about the condition that both armies were without cavalry and consequently without the information of each other's position until they ran across each other by accident at Gettysburg.
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 27: the Gettysburg Campaign. (search)
by their officers to give up their plan and return to their camp. The corps to which these men belonged left during the night and there was no further trouble. While on duty at the Gap, Col. Devereux was kept in the position of General Officer of the Day, and as Col. Charles Morgan, Hancock's chief of staff, was an old schoolmate, the two were much together. While on a scouting trip to the top of the Blue Ridge, the two officers, through glasses, witnessed the fight at Aldie Gap, where Stewart was put to flight by Pleasanton. While the corps were halted at Thoroughfare Gap, it was necessary to have a picket line all around it, different regiments being selected each day. The corps was continually harassed, particularly at night, by Mosby's guerillas. Because some man on picket would get startled and imagine he saw the enemy, he would fire his gun and the whole corps would be under arms in a moment, thus depriving all the men of their sleep. On one day Gen. Hancock asked his
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Roster of the Nineteenth regiment Massachusetts Volunteers (search)
15, ‘65; 22; M. O. June 30, ‘65. Stenford, Joseph, priv., (—), Dec. 10, ‘62; 23; N. F.R. Stephens, Robert W., priv., band, Sept. 3, ‘61; 29; disch. Nov. 17, ‘61. Stephenson, Geo., priv., (—), Apr. 13, ‘64; 35; transf. to Navy Apr. 23, ‘64. Stewart, Chas. H., priv., (A), Aug. 10, ‘61; 23; disch. disa. May 28, ‘62. Stevens, Austin, priv., (F), May 14, ‘64; 33; drafted; pris. since June 22, ‘64; M. O. June 30, ‘65; abs. Stevens, Benj., priv., (C), July 26, ‘61; 18; killed in action June 20; drafted; M. O. June 30, ‘65; abs. pris. since June 22, ‘64. Walker, Hugh, priv., (F), Aug. 6, ‘61; 19; never joined for duty. Walker, Irving E., priv., (A), Mar. 28, ‘64; 24; abs. pris. since June 22, ‘64; not heard from since. Walker, Stewart, priv., (—), Feb. 16, ‘64; 44; rejected Feb. 17, ‘64. Walker, Wm., mus., (H), Aug. 12, ‘61; 17; disch. disa. Feb. 4, ‘63 in Co. D. Wallace, Benj. F., priv., (F), Jan. 25, ‘62; 22; disch. disa. Ju
.............................. 105 Stevens, R. W.,...................................................... 43 Stevens, George (I),.................................................. 203 Stevens, George H.,...............................................107, 108 Stevens, James (E),.................................................. 188 Stevensburg, Va.,.................................................... 289 Stewart, Alonzo,...................................................... 322 Stewart, Charles,...................................................... 35 Stewart, William,................................................... 286 Stillman, Peter,.................................................. 285, 324 Stone, Benjamin A.,................................................... 105 Stone Bridge, Antietam,............................................ 133 Stone, Charles P., Gen.,........................................... 15, 17, 28 Stone, Samuel, Jr.,...............................
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
is'Heth's39159198 11th Ga G. T. Anderson'sHood's32162194 38th Va Armistead'sPickett's23147170 6th N. CHoke'sEarly's2013121172 13th MissBarksdale'sMcLaws'28137165 8th AlaWilcox'sAnderson's.22139161 47th N. CPettigrew'sHeth's21140161 3d N. CStewart'sJohnson's29127156 2d N. C. BatDaniel'sRodes'29124153 2d S. C.Kershaw'sMcLaws'271252154 52d N. CPettigrew'sHeth's33114147 5th N. CIverson'sRodes'31112143 32d N. CDaniel'sHeth's26116142 43d N. C Daniel'sHeth's21126147 9th Ga.G. T. Anderson's.Hood's8115143 1st Md. BatStewart'sJohnson's25119144 3d ArkRobertson'sHood's26116142 23d N. CIverson'sRodes'4193134 57th VaArmistead'sPickett's351054144 I must not fail to mention in this connection the record of Company C, 11th North Carolina, which was with Pettigrew at Gettysburg on July 1, and lost a captain and lieutenant, and thirty-four out of thirty-eight men. The company had three separate captains on that terrible day. The first was made major; the second, Thomas Watson Coop
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.3 (search)
argument against confiscation of Southern property, and other Northern papers quoted and approved its views. Indications of moderation such as these inspired the people of Texas with the hope that the evils they had feared would at least be mitigated, and that civil government under the Constitution would soon be restored. This seemed to be promised by the appointment of Andrew J. Hamilton provisional governor by the proclamation of President Johnson on June 17, 1865. The late Hon. Charles Stewart has described Governor Hamilton as in many respects a remarkable man, and as a man of generous impulses and of extraordinary intellectual power. He was a member of Congress at the time of secession, and being a Union man went north at the beginning of the war and remained there until its close. Among the duties imposed upon him by the President was that of convening a constitutional convention, the proclamation reciting that the delegates were to be chosen by that portion of the pe
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