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Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert 14 2 Browse Search
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Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Chapter 6: from Manassas to Leesburg. (search)
something very like it. I recall the cocked hat, blue, buff-faced coat, of that cut, fa‘--top boots, and a drawn sword in his hand of about the length and model of a scythe blade. It was not a very bright night, but his whole attitude showed absorbed and sympathetic attention. I had hardly ceased when he stepped briskly toward me, saluted, wheeled and faced the regiment and his, the leading company, and uttered, in quite a soldierly tone, just these words: Snickersville Blues, fall out! Mr. Stiles is right, and I am going to stand by him! The example was contagious, and in a few moments the strained situation was entirely relieved. In the morning General Hill decided that I was right, commended the course I had pursued, and said he would send for a commission for me (which I presume he forgot); but suggested that it might interest and conciliate the regiment if we would pick out two or three detachments and drill them in the manual of the heavy pieces. We did so with admirabl
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Chapter 7: the Peninsula Campaign. (search)
our pieces, and I met a line or mass of troops advancing to our support. Hearing some one call Stiles! I asked, Who said Stiles and who are you speaking to? A voice answered, I called Stiles, and Stiles and who are you speaking to? A voice answered, I called Stiles, and another, close beside me, said, He's speaking to me. Stiles is my name. I'm Capt. Edward Stiles, of Savannah, Georgia. I grasped his hand, unable to see him, and having only time to say, Then I'm yoStiles, and another, close beside me, said, He's speaking to me. Stiles is my name. I'm Capt. Edward Stiles, of Savannah, Georgia. I grasped his hand, unable to see him, and having only time to say, Then I'm your cousin, Robert Stiles, of Richmond, Virginia. Look you up to-morrow. Until that moment I did not know I had a relative in the Virginia army, knowing that some and supposing that all of my cousinsStiles is my name. I'm Capt. Edward Stiles, of Savannah, Georgia. I grasped his hand, unable to see him, and having only time to say, Then I'm your cousin, Robert Stiles, of Richmond, Virginia. Look you up to-morrow. Until that moment I did not know I had a relative in the Virginia army, knowing that some and supposing that all of my cousins were in the armies of the coast defense. It was, of course, well understood by all of us that the Federal commander, having complete control of the navigable rivers, by virtue of his overwhelmingCapt. Edward Stiles, of Savannah, Georgia. I grasped his hand, unable to see him, and having only time to say, Then I'm your cousin, Robert Stiles, of Richmond, Virginia. Look you up to-morrow. Until that moment I did not know I had a relative in the Virginia army, knowing that some and supposing that all of my cousins were in the armies of the coast defense. It was, of course, well understood by all of us that the Federal commander, having complete control of the navigable rivers, by virtue of his overwhelming naval power, could at any time turn either of our flanks or land a heavy force between us and Richmond, and that therefore our present line could not be a permanent one. We were not surprised, then
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Chapter 20: from Spottsylvania to Cold Harbor (search)
him and suggested whether there was not danger in our proceeding as we were, a battalion of artillery unaccompanied by infantry, out and beyond the last picket post. The colonel was a strict constructionist, and he shut me up at once by saying: Stiles, that is the responsibility of the general officer who sent me my orders. I am ordered to Beulah Church and to Beulah Church I am going. This is the nearest road. I looked up at him in some little surprise, but said no more; having fired, I nopurpose of hauling it off. I could see nothing, but by this time my suspicion had become conviction and I felt sure I was talking with General Wofford. He positively forbade the attempt, and did not seem disposed to yield until my cousin, Col. Edward Stiles, of the Sixteenth Georgia, of-his brigade, who knew the General well, joined us and suggested as a compromise that we should make the attempt without taking the horses any further; to which I agreed, upon condition that he would furnish me