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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 76 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 38 4 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 1, 1861., [Electronic resource] 35 19 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 34 2 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 29 5 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 20 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 11 3 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 11 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 27, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Stone or search for Stone in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

nnessee. Chattanooga, March 25. --All quiet. No fighting since Morgan's engagement at Liberty. The Federal still occupy Murfreesboro'. Our scouts are in Lebanon, and operating along the south bank of the Cumberland river from Lebanon to Stone's river. Accounts from the north bank of the Cumberland report that the Yankees are destroying farming implements and foraging the whole country. The inhabitants are compelled to hide their provisions. Five thousand Yankee infantry occupy Gallting along the south bank of the Cumberland river from Lebanon to Stone's river. Accounts from the north bank of the Cumberland report that the Yankees are destroying farming implements and foraging the whole country. The inhabitants are compelled to hide their provisions. Five thousand Yankee infantry occupy Gallatin, and the Louisville road is strongly guarded. It is reported that the Yankees have destroyed Stone's river railroad and turnpike bridges between Murfreesboro' and Nashville.
The battle-field. --A writer in the Holston Journal thus describes the field of battle on the day after the fight at Murfreesboro'; Ah! how many expired with the year. Here they lie, friend and foe in every possible position, a vast promiscuous ruin. "They sleep their last sleep; they have fought their last battle; No sound can awake them to glory again." After a pretty thorough inspection of the ground in the rear of our lines, from Stone's river to the extreme left, I ride to the front where the dead jay thick among the cedars, in the proportion of five Yankees to one Southron. Here are sights so the bravest hearts, and lessons for human passion and oppression. Here is a foot shot off at the ankle, a fine modal for a soulpto.--Here is an officer's hand, severed from the wrist, the glove still upon it, and the award still in its gross, Here is an entire brain, perfectly isolated, showing no sign of violence, as if carefully taken from the skull that encl