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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 2.20 (search)
rations are in the nature of a military surprise. When an advantage is to be gained by hard fighting or the weight of a mass of troops, the word carry is instinctively used. In corroboration of this proposition, I will state that in the Third interview I had with Burnside, after the battle, he said, I should have ordered Franklin to carry the heights at Captain Hamilton's at all hazards. just as General Burnside was leaving, shortly after nightfall, I asked to be permitted to order General Stoneman's Corps (the Third) to cross at once. He declined to give the permission, but assured me I would have the orders before midnight. Had the permission been granted, the First and Sixth Corps would have been in position for the attack by daylight, the Third Corps taking the place of the Sixth, which would have attacked with the First Corps. Had the necessary orders been received, even by midnight, the movements would have been made under cover of the darkness, and the whole night after m
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Fredericksburg, Va. (search)
vin, Lieut.-Col. Duncan McVicar; 8th Pa., Lieut.-Col. Amos E. Griffiths; 6th U. S., Capt. George C. Cram. Artillery: M, 2d U. S., Lieut. Alexander C. M. Pennington, Jr. center Grand division, Maj.-Gen. Jos. Hooker. Third Army Corps, Brig.-Gen. George Stoneman. First division, Brig.-Gen. David B. Birney. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John C. Robinson: 20th Ind., Col. John Van Valkenburg; 63d Pa., Maj. John A. Danks; 68th Pa., Col. Andrew H. Tippin; 105th Pa., Col. Amor A. McKnight; 114th Pa., C0,000; Ninth Corps (Burns's division), 4000; Bayard's cavalry, 3500. General Sumner had about 27,000 men, comprising his own grand division, except Burns's division of the Ninth Corps. General Hooker's command was about 26,000 strong, two of General Stoneman's divisions having reported to General Franklin. These numbers aggregate 113,000. According to Burnside's return for December 10th ( Official Records, Vol. XXI., p. 1121), the present for duty equipped, or available for line of battle,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 3.24 (search)
Stoneman's raid in the Chancellorsville campaign. see map, p. 155 of this volume, and also p. 164 of volume II.--editors. The original instructions to General George Stoneman for the cooperation of the cavalry in the Chancellorsville campaign directed him to cross the Rappahhe movements of the corps are given in detail in the report of General Stoneman: On April 27th, I, then being at Warrenton Junction, with with three brigades, was to advance on Culpeper Court House, while Stoneman, with three brigades numbering about 3500, under D. McM. Gregg, wao nothing. Thie general is very anxious to know where to look for Stoneman, as we have heard nothing from him. Most respectfully, your obirginia Cavalry, and six privates of the 9th and 10th Major-General George Stoneman. From a photograph. Virginia Cavalry. The rest of thom the enemy's cavalry set free by our recall. The column with Stoneman now prepared to return to the army. His report continues: The
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 3.25 (search)
kles; the Fifth by Meade; the Sixth by Sedgwick; the Eleventh by Howard; the Twelfth by Slocum, and the cavalry corps by Stoneman. In each corps the badge of the First Division was red; of the S econd Division, white; of the Third Division, blue. Aion, shoeing animals, issuing provisions, and making every preparation necessary to an advance. The next day, the 13th, Stoneman was put in motion at the head of ten thousand finely equipped and well organized cavalry to ascend the Rappahannock and,d, to attack the Confederate cavalry wherever it might be found, and Fight! Fight! Fight! At the end of two days march Stoneman found Outline map of the Chancellorsville campaign. The right wing of Hooker's army crossing the Rappahannock at Khe 27th. This unexpected delay of the cavalry seemingly deranged Hooker's original plan of campaign. He had hoped that Stoneman would have been able to place his horsemen on the railroad between Fredericksburg and Richmond, by which Lee received hi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The successes and failures of Chancellorsville. (search)
ksburg, with the purpose of moving down upon General Lee's army to take it in rear and flank-two divisions of the Second Corps being placed to cover Banks's Ford, the third division being left at Falmouth, while a brigade and battery were stationed at United States Ford to facilitate the crossing. The Cavalry Corps, with the exception of one small brigade of three regiments and a battery of horse artillery, which was left under my command with the army, was ordered under the command of General Stoneman to make a raid in rear of Lee's army, and destroy his railroads and his communications with Richmond. This corps did great service by drawing off General Lee's cavalry, under General J. E. B. Stuart, to Brandy Station and Culpeper, thus depriving General Lee of their services; for General Hooker moved the three corps with him with such celerity that they passed between Stuart and Lee's army, and Stuart could not get through to communicate to Lee what was going on. It will be seen lat
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The Eleventh Corps at Chancellorsville. (search)
some forty degrees with the Orange Plank road. At dawn of that eventful day General Hooker was at Chancellorsville. Slocum and Hancock were just in his front, infantry and artillery deployed to the right and left. French's division was in his rear. Meade occupied the extreme left, and my corps, the Eleventh, the right. Sickles connected me with Slocum. Our lines covered between five and six miles of frontage, and Hooker was near the middle point. The main body of our cavalry, under Stoneman, had gone off on a raid upon Lee's communications, and the remainder of the Army of the Potomac was under the sturdy Sedgwick, beyond Fredericksburg. Our opponents, under General Robert E. Lee, the evening before, were about two miles distant toward Fredericksburg, and thus between us and Sedgwick. Lee had immediately with him the divisions of McLaws, Anderson, Rodes, Colston, and A. P. Hill, besides some cavalry under Stuart. He The old Chancellor house, burned during the battle.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces in the Chancellorsville campaign. (search)
cavalry Corps, The Second and Third Divisions, First Brigade, First Division, and the Regular Reserve Brigade, with Robertson's and Tidball's batteries, on the Stoneman raid. Brig.-Gen. George Stoneman. First division, Brig.-Gen. Alfred Pleasonton. First Brigade, Col. Benjamin F. Davis; 8th Ill., Lieut.-Col. David R. ClendenBrig.-Gen. George Stoneman. First division, Brig.-Gen. Alfred Pleasonton. First Brigade, Col. Benjamin F. Davis; 8th Ill., Lieut.-Col. David R. Clendenin; 3d Ind., Col. George H. Chapman; 8th N. Y.,----; 9th N. Y., Col. William Sackett. Brigade loss: k, 1; w, 8; m, 22 = 31. Second Brigade, Col. Thomas C. Devin: L, 1st Mich., Lieut. John K. Truax; 6th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Duncan MoVicar (k), Capt. William E. Beardsley; 8th Pa., Maj. Pennock Huey; 17th Pa., Col. Josiah H. Kellogg; 6illed.Wounded.Captured or Missing.Total. Germanna Ford, April 2914 5 Franklin's Crossing, April 29--May 2218 20 Fitzhugh's Crossing, April 29--May 2191449172 Stoneman's Raid, Apl. 29--May 1147139150 Old Wilderness Tavern, April 3011 2 Chancellorsville, April 30 3 3 Spotsylvania C. H., April 303123651 Rapidan Station, May 1
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Opposing Sherman's advance to Atlanta. (search)
nt adjutant-general, from official records in his office. See another estimate, p. 281.--editors. Sherman had assembled at that time an army of 98,797 men and 254 guns; but before the armies actually met, three divisions of cavalry under Generals Stoneman, Garrard, and McCook added 10,000 or 12,000 men to the number. The object prescribed to him by General Grant was to move against Johnston's army, to break it up, and to get into the interior of the enemy's country as far as he could, infli Wheeler was directed to move next morning with all the available cavalry around the north end of Rocky-face, to learn if a general movement of the enemy was in progress. He was to be supported by Hindman's division. In this reconnoissance General Stoneman's division of cavalry was encountered and driven back. The information gained confirmed the reports of the day before. About 10 o'clock A. M. of the 13th the Confederate army moved from Dalton and reached Resaca just as the Federal troop
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Atlanta campaign. May 3d-September 8th, 1864. (search)
achment 9th Ohio, Capt. L. H. Bowlus; McLaughlin's Ohio Squadron, Maj. Richard Rice; and the 24th Ind. Battery, Lieut. Hiram Allen. The Dismounted Brigade, commanded by Col. Horace Capron, was composed of the 14th and 16th lll., 5th and 6th Ind., and 12th Ky. The 16th Ill. was detailed as provost guard Twenty-third Corps from August 16th, and the 12th Ky. as cattle guard from August 21st. The 6th Ind., under Maj. William H. Carter, was ordered to Nashville for remount August 23d. Maj.-Gen. George Stoneman, Col. Horace Capron. Escort: D, 7th Ohio, Lieut. Samuel Murphy, Lieut. W. W. Manning. First Brigade (joined army in the field July 27th), Col. Israel Garrard: 9th Mich., Col. George S. Acker; 7th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. George C. Miner. Second Brigade (designated as the First Brigade until July 31st), Col. James Biddle, Col. Thomnas H. Butler, Col. James Biddle: 16th Ill., Capt. Hiram S. Hanchett; 5th Ind., Col. Thomas H. Butler, Maj. Moses D. Leeson; 6th Ind., Lieut.-Col. C. C. Ma
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The struggle for Atlanta. (search)
would now speedily fall back to Resaca, at once changed his purpose. Leaving me at Rocky Face with the Fourth Corps and Stoneman's small division of cavalry to hold our line of supply, Sherman pressed after McPherson the armies of Thomas and Schofieis clean retreats. At dawn of the 13th the formidable Buzzard-Roost Gap was open and safe, and our men passed through. Stoneman rushed into the village of Dalton from the north, and the Fourth Corps, eager and rapid, kept close to the chasing cavald from that place, and McPherson did the same from his position, laying his bridges so as to take the road to Van Wert. Stoneman's cavalry covered the left; Garrard's division was near McPherson and Davis, while McCook's cleared the front for the ceirection, Sherman, mixing divisions somewhat along the line, gradually bore his armies to the left. The 1st of June put Stoneman into Allatoona, and on the 3d Schofield's infantry was across the railroad near Ackworth, having had a severe and succes
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