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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 68 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 45 1 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 40 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 34 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 27 11 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 26 2 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 26 4 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 24 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 20 4 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 18 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 23, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Stoneman or search for Stoneman in all documents.

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nge of the dead bodies was resumed and continued until completed. On Monday afternoon Gen. Lee sent a flag of truce to Gen. Burnside, asking him to detail men to bury his dead in front of Gen Sumner's grand division. This was done. The wounded, with the exception of those the enemy obtained, have all been brought to this side of the Rappahannock, and as rapidly as possible are being sent to Washington. The loss in Franklin's grand division, which in- cluded two divisions of Stoneman's corps, is. In killed, 443; wounded, 3,343; missing, 1,900. There is reason to believe that the greater portion of the wounded are made prisoners. The loss in Gen. Sumner's and Hooker's grand divisions, which made the assault upon the enemy's works, cannot be fully ascertained as yet but sufficient is known to justify the assertion that our loss in killed and wounded will reach ten to twelve thousand in the battle of Saturday. During the flag of truce Gen Stuart, of the rebel army,