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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 176 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 10 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 8 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 6 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 2 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
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43. war song. Dedicated to the Massachusetts regiments. by W. W. Story. To the Editor of the N. Y. Tribune. Sir: Will you give a place in your columns to this song? As I am too far away to shoulder a musket, let me at least sead my voice over the water with a cheer for Liberty and the North. W. W. story. Rome, June 1, 1861. Up with the Flag of the Stripes and the Stars! Gather together from plough and from loom! Hark to the signal!--the music of wars Sounding for tyrants and traitorW. W. story. Rome, June 1, 1861. Up with the Flag of the Stripes and the Stars! Gather together from plough and from loom! Hark to the signal!--the music of wars Sounding for tyrants and traitors their doom. March, march, march, march! Brothers unite — rouse in your might, For Justice and Freedom, for God and the Right! Down with the foe to the land and the laws! Marching together our country to save, God shall be with us to strengthen our cause, Nerving the heart and the hand of the brave. March, march, march, march! Brothers unite — rouse in your might, For Justice and Freedom, for God and the Right! Flag of the Free! under thee we will fight, Shoulder to shoulder, our face to the f
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge, Chapter 2: old Cambridge in three literary epochs (search)
the whole, to be classed as Cambridge authors, together with the total of contributions credited to each in the Atlantic Index, of 1888: W. D. Howells, 399; T. S. Perry, 355; H. E. Scudder, 196; O. W. Holmes, 18I; G. P. Lathrop, 168; W. F. Apthorp, 134; Henry James, Jr., 134; J. R. Lowell, 132; T. W. Higginson, 117; T. B. Aldrich, I I; John Fiske, 89; G. E. Woodberry, 73; H. W. Longfellow, 68; C. P. Cranch, 45; C. E. Norton, 44; N. S. Shaler, 32; R. W. Emerson, 29; Henry James, Sr., 19; W. W. Story, 17; Wilson Flagg, 14; William James, 12. This is, of course, a merely quantitative estimate, in which a brief critical paper may count for as much as the most important original work; but the point of interest is that it comprises almost every one of those who were, tried by this numerical standard, the main contributors. Thus judged, it may almost be said that the bulk of the magazine, for a long series of years, has been furnished by those who may in some sense be claimed as Cambridg
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge, Index (search)
le, Lord, 195. Sales, Francis, 17, 23. Sanborn, F. B., 156, 174, 177. Scott, Sir, Walter, 26, 35, 177. Scott, Sir, William, 45. Scudder, H. E., 69, 70. Sewall, Samuel, 12. Sewell, Jonathan, 12. Seward, W. H., 178. Shaler, Prof. N. S., 70. Shepard, Rev., Thomas, 3, 5, 7. Sidney, Sir, Philip, 159. Smalley, G. A., 192. Smith, Sydney, 105. Smollett, Tobias, 95. Sparks, Pres., Jared, 14, 44, 128. Spenser, Edmund, 47, 154. Storer, Dr. D. H., 113. Story, Judge, Joseph, 16, 44. Story, W. W., 16, 26, 70, 154, 155. Stowe, Rev. C. E., 90, 113. Stowe, Mrs. H. B., 65, 66, go. Sumner, Charles, 104, 123, 132, 191. Swift, Dean, 95, 166. Swinburne, A. C., 132. Tennyson, Lord, 132, 195. Thaxter, Celia, 179. Thaxter, L. L., 174. Thayer, Nathaniel, 106. Thoreau, H. D., 34, 58, 67, 191. Ticknor, Prof., George, 14, 27, 117, 121, 122, 191. Tracy, John, 78. Trowbridge, J. T., 65. Tuckerman, H. T., 172. Tudor, William, 44. Tufts, Henry, 30. Underwood, F. H., 65, 66, 67, 68
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays, Index. (search)
. Spofford, Harriet (Prescott), 129, 130, 177, 178, 179. Sprague, A. B. R., 250. Spring, L. W., 207. Spring, Mrs., Rebecca, 230. Spuller, M., 300. Stackpole, J. L., 74. Stallknecht, F. S., 104. Stearns, G. L., 215, 217, 218, 221, 222. Steedman, Charles, 261. Stevens, A. D. , 229, 231. Stevens, C. E., 157, 158. Stewart, Dugald, H. Stillman, Mrs., 296. Storrow, Ann (Appleton), 7, 9. Storrow, Anne G., 7. Storrow, S. E., 74. Storrow, Thomas, 7, 8. Story, Joseph, 47- Story, W. W., 77. Story, William, 19, 22, 28. Story family, the, 75. Stowe, C. E. t 139, 178, 179, 180. Stowe, Harriet Beecher, 176, 177, 178, 179, 1800 213. Stowell, Martin, 147, 148, 149, 151, 153, 156, 157, 191, 198, 215. Straub, Mr., 209. Straub, Miss, 209. Strauss, D. F., 10r. Stuart, Gilbert, 280. Sullivan, J. L., 263. Sumner, Charles, 53, 125, 146, 175, 196, 267. Suttle, C. F., 148. Swift, J. L., 151. Swinburne, A. C., 289. Swiveller, Dick, 30. Tacitus, C. C., 360. Tadema
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, III: the boy student (search)
up when it was so sought after that we had one application from a Southwestern college which said that they had heard of f. B. K. and as they already had nine Greek letter societies it would be nice to have ten! In the college journal, the event is thus recorded: August, 1840. f. B. K. day—the greatest of my life so far. Rushed round till 9 on committee business—having carried the ribbons to Wheeler's room and put on my medal. . . . I went in [to dinner] later than was necessary—Judge Story and the grandees sat at the raised West end. First course I had was roast beef carved by White Simmons. 2nd, plum pudding and apple pie, then wine, fruit and segars—Passed a charming afternoon, lots of wit— the Judge always ready and always witty, as President. In the spring of his Junior year, Wentworth wrote:— Such a smile as today's! The 2nd English Oration, a first Bowdoin prize and good pieces accepted in the magazine—and I am for the present perfectly happy. Du
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, VI: in and out of the pulpit (search)
I belong by nature; and this seems a good place to do it. The congregation is very large and they desire very much that I should come. And it will very probably be so. Later he told his mother:— I was yesterday offered $1200 to give up Worcester and be Secretary to the Temperance Committee for another year. . . . There is a feeling of the necessity for a vigilant superintendence while the law is being enforced. I of course declined. His mother replied that she would let him choose his own way of doing good, not even saying, as Judge Story's mother did: Now, Jo, I've sat up and tended you many a night when you were a Baby, and don't you Dare not to be a great Man. She added that she did not even care to have him a great Man, except as greatness was achieved by interesting himself in the good of those within his reach. Steer clear your own way, she exclaimed, and the result I am sure will be right. . . . You object to beginning Life anew—remember you are not yet 3
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XV: journeys (search)
uished looking man, a handsome likeness of his grandpapa. And later:— To tea at William Wordsworth's, returning on donkeys. W. W. is the favorite grandson of the poet. The next extract is from a Florence letter:— May 23. To-day I lunched with the Marchesa Peruzzi de Medici. She is the daughter of Story the sculptor. She lives in a narrow street. You come up a fine stairway into a series of dark high rooms, with some quaint old furniture, frescoed walls and many traces of Story's sculpture work. Out of one parlor opens a small private chapel. I waited a while and heard a door open softly and in glided a little elderly woman, quiet as possible, and putting out a shy soft hand to me. I was quite bewildered by her being so much older in appearance and more unworldly than the brilliant society woman I had expected; and when she sat down with an anxious look and seemed to wait for me, I reverted to the subject which led me there and said, I was very sorry that Mr. Wal
ley, 28, 37. Storrow, Louisa, birth, 5; marries Stephen Higginson, 5. See also Higginson, Louisa Storrow. Storrow, Capt., Thomas, of the British army, 2; sketch of, 3, 4. Storrow, Thomas Wentworth, uncle of T. W. H., his namesake, 5. Story, Judge, 35, 116. Story, W. W., the sculptor, 355. Stowe, Harriet Beecher, nr, 159. Stowell, Martin, party led by, 168. Sumner, Charles, 38, 166, 238; described, 96, 97; buys and frees negro family, 153. Sunshine and Petrarch, 276-78, 410Story, W. W., the sculptor, 355. Stowe, Harriet Beecher, nr, 159. Stowell, Martin, party led by, 168. Sumner, Charles, 38, 166, 238; described, 96, 97; buys and frees negro family, 153. Sunshine and Petrarch, 276-78, 410. Swanwich, Anna, 334. Swinburne, A. C., on Lowell, 336; Higginson visits, 359, 360. Sympathy of Religions, 164, 328, 411. Tales of the Enchanted Islands of the Atlantic, 386, 422. Taylor, Helen, 340. Tennyson, Alfred, 357; account of, 326. Thackeray, Miss, and Higginson, 326. Thackeray, William Makepeace, Higginson describes, 128, 129. Thalatta, 159, 405. Thaxter, Celia (Leighton), account of, 109. Thaxter, Levi, 45, 57; friendship for Higginson, 23; and Isles of Shoa
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
le, 148, 234, 348, 349, 368 Stephen, Leslie, 232 Sterne, 103 Stewart, Dugald, 197 Stevenson, B. E., 304 Stevenson, R. L., 6, 9, 10, 15, 230, 240 Stiles, Rev., Ezra, 198, 200, 201 n., 205, 206 Stockton, F. R., 374, 385-386, 388, 407 Stoddard, R. H., 167, 276, 281, 286 Stonewall Jackson's grave, 307 Stonewall Jackson's way, 298, 299, 304, 307 Stories mother nature told, 405 Stories of Georgia, 348 n. Stories revived, 387 Story, Joseph, 71, 72, 76-78, 118 Story, W. W., 276 Story of a bad boy, 405 Stowe, Harriet Beecher, 199, 211, 214, 351, 352, 382, 401 Stranger in Lowell, the, 52 Strauss, 209 Stuart, Moses, 208, 209, 211 Such is the death the soldier dies, 331 Sumner, Charles, 51, 143, 144, 319 Sun (N. Y.), 186, 187, 357 n. Sunday, 5 Sunrise, 343 Supernaturalism of New England, the, 52 Susan Coolidge. See Woolsey, Sarah Sut Lovengood. See Harris, G. W. Surrender at Appomattox, the, 279, 285 Swamp Fox, the, 306
kes a declaration of independence for the separate person, the single man of Emerson's Phi Beta Kappa address. I wear my hat as I please, indoors and out. Sometimes this is mere swagger. Sometimes it is superb. So much for the type. Let us turn next to the story of Whitman's life. It must here be told in the briefest fashion, for Whitman's own prose and poetry relate the essentials of his biography. He was born on Long Island, of New England and Dutch ancestry, in 1819. Lowell, W. W. Story, and Charles A. Dana were born in that year, as was also George Eliot. Whitman's father was a carpenter, who leaned to the Quakers. There were many children. When little Walt --as he was called, to distinguish him from his father, Walter — was four, the family moved to Brooklyn. The boy had scanty schooling, and by the time he was twenty had tried type-setting, teaching, and editing a country newspaper on Long Island. He was a big, dark-haired fellow, sensitive, emotional, extraordin
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