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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 32: the annexation of Texas.—the Mexican War.—Winthrop and Sumner.—1845-1847. (search)
same spirit, assuming a supercilious tone, and threatening him with the loss of private and public confidence. Boston Advertiser, Feb. 17, 1848. Sumner had been of service, two years before, in composing a difficulty between Mr. Curtis and W. W. Story, a relative, for which B. R. Curtis wrote Sumner, May 24, 1846, thanking him for disinterested, judicious, and kind exertions in this unhappy affair. It is hardly needful to say that the style of writing about him kept up for some weeks did early and favorite idea with Sumner, finally carried out by himself in 1860. I wish to see Theodore Parker's letter Letter to the People of the United States touching Slavery. spoken in the Senate. That will diffuse it everywhere. To W. W. Story, January 14:— E——is stiffening and hardening into a stanch Old Whig, and talks of regular nominations, and voting the regular ticket. He seems to be inspired with an exalted idea of a combination to which I am entirely indifferent,— t
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 35: Massachusetts and the compromise.—Sumner chosen senator.—1850-1851. (search)
gned to the Fugitive Slave bill can never be forgotten. There are depths of infamy as there are heights of fame. I regret to say what I must, but truth compels me. Better for him had he never been born! Better for his memory, and for the good name of his children, had he never been President! . . . And here, sir, let me say that it becomes me to speak with caution. It happens that I sustain an important relation to this bill. Early in professional life I was designated by the late Judge Story a commissioner of his court, and, though I do not very often exercise the functions of this appointment, my name is still upon the list. As such I am one of those before whom the panting fugitive may be dragged for the decision of the question whether he is a freeman or a slave. But while it becomes me to speak with caution, I shall not hesitate to speak with plainness. I cannot forget that I am a man, although I am a commissioner. . . . It rests with you, my fellow-citizens, by wor
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 36: first session in Congress.—welcome to Kossuth.—public lands in the West.—the Fugitive Slave Law.—1851-1852. (search)
ing. To Theodore Parker, February 6:— I have yours of 25th of January proposing to me to write an article on Judge Story in the Westminster Review. As a filial service I should be glad to do this; but how can I? I rarely go to bed beforegelow, February 8:— Pardon me if I say frankly you have done injustice to Story. Mr. Bigelow had in a review of Judge Story's Life and Letters, in the New York Evening Post, Jan. 29 and Feb. 4, 1852, disparaged the judge's character as a juripriate epithet to its author. When interrupted by Sumner with an inquiry as to the authorities for a legal opinion of Judge Story he had cited, he replied that Story's authority was of ten thousand times more value than that of the senator from MasStory's authority was of ten thousand times more value than that of the senator from Massachusetts, who will please to have the decency not to interrupt me. He intimated that association with the author of such a speech might not be hereafter agreeable to Southern senators,—a remark altogether misplaced, as Sumner had sought no introd<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 37: the national election of 1852.—the Massachusetts constitutional convention.—final defeat of the coalition.— 1852-1853. (search)
his heels. Receiving an invitation to attend the Fourth of July celebration by the city government of Boston for this year, Sumner sent to the mayor a toast in favor of a railroad from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean, Works, vol. III. p. 228.—an enterprise whose fulfilment seemed then far in the distance. Congress had taken the first step in the preceding March by providing for a survey, but the line was not open across the continent till sixteen years later. Sumner wrote to W. W. Story at Rome, August 2:— I take up this old sheet on which nearly a year ago I commenced a letter to you; if I have not written it has not been from indifference. Only yesterday the convention for revising our Constitution closed its labors. I was a member for the borough of Marshfield, and have been much occupied in various ways during the session. This is our first day of rest, and I fly to you and Rome. Of all the members of the convention, during our three months work, Richard
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, chapter 14 (search)
at Cisterna. From Albano they drove to the lakes Albano and Nemi, and by the middle of the afternoon they alighted in the Piazza di Spagna in Rome, where Mrs. William W. Story awaited Sumner with a carriage, and claiming him as guest, drove him to her apartment in the Palazzo Barberini. Mr. Bemis thus wrote in his journal of Snce borne such fruit. Then it was I predicted that if I ever came again to Rome I should find him living in a palace,—in a palace, but not living, alas! William W. Story writes of Sumner's visit to Rome at this Time:— After the terrible assault upon him in the Senate chamber, broken down in health and doubting whether hngs conspire for the moment to keep him faithful to the idea of Italian independence. But this is a great moment in history,—nothing like it since 1815. To W. W. Story:— Let me say that a note which Cavour wrote me in French was written in the clear round hand of his country,—so different from the French, which is sma
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 43: return to the Senate.—the barbarism of slavery.—Popular welcomes.—Lincoln's election.—1859-1860. (search)
o Boston in 1794, and on the Prince of Wales and his suite. He was pleased to find his brother George, now in full sympathy with his own views, at last taking part in public work, speaking for the first time in a political campaign. One day he sought Mount Auburn, lately unfamiliar to him, and wrote to William Story, August 10:— Yesterday I was at Mount Auburn, especially to see the statues in the chapel. I had not been there for years. I was pleased with them all; but yours [of Judge Story] seemed to me more beautiful than ever, both as portrait and as art. I doubt if there be a finer statue in existence. The grounds about are well filled with marbles and stones, such as they are; but the chief ornament was the trees and shrubbery, which were beautiful. By the side of your family were flowers showing constant care. A note to Dr. Palfrey, October 14, relates to a book included in his diversions:— I have just read the most masterly, learned, profound, and multum i
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 49: letters to Europe.—test oath in the senate.—final repeal of the fugitive-slave act.—abolition of the coastwise slave-trade.—Freedmen's Bureau.—equal rights of the colored people as witnesses and passengers.—equal pay of colored troops.—first struggle for suffrage of the colored people.—thirteenth amendment of the constitution.— French spoliation claims.—taxation of national banks.— differences with Fessenden.—Civil service Reform.—Lincoln's re-election.—parting with friends.—1863-1864. (search)
I have been pained to learn that the Duchess of Sutherland, whose kindness to me enabled me to see you whom I already honored much, is still ailing. I hope that her generous nature may be spared yet longer to soften and quicken our social life. I am sure that she will rejoice when slavery, now in arms, is cast down, never to rise again. I think she would be glad to help at this overthrow. The date of your letter (Hawarden) reminds me of a pleasant day which I can never forget. To W. W. Story, Rome, January 1:— A happy New Year to you and yours! I think of you constantly, and always with affection, and vow letters. But my life is so crowded that I have found myself dropping correspondence that did not come under the head, if not of business, at least of public interest. The Psyche A copy of the antique, for which Sumner had given Story a commission. is superb, and I enjoy it much. You know the bronzes were lost on the coast of Spain. . . . Of course I watch your as
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 50: last months of the Civil War.—Chase and Taney, chief-justices.—the first colored attorney in the supreme court —reciprocity with Canada.—the New Jersey monopoly.— retaliation in war.—reconstruction.—debate on Louisiana.—Lincoln and Sumner.—visit to Richmond.—the president's death by assassination.—Sumner's eulogy upon him. —President Johnson; his method of reconstruction.—Sumner's protests against race distinctions.—death of friends. —French visitors and correspondents.—1864-1865. (search)
n in which Agassiz gave an account of his researches. June 21, 1865. and Dec. 26, 1865, the latter printed in Agassiz's Life, p. 635. In the summer of 1865, Mr. and Mrs. William W. Story, long residents in Rome, were visiting relatives in Boston. It was pleasant for Sumner to meet again his old friends. He saw much of StoMrs. William W. Story, long residents in Rome, were visiting relatives in Boston. It was pleasant for Sumner to meet again his old friends. He saw much of Story at dinners at the Saturday Club and on other days, and in drives in the suburbs of the city. Sumner always reverted with tenderness to old fellowships, and in intercourse with the son he revived the memories of the father. He kept up his interest in Story's work as a sculptor, and art as well as life in Italy were refreshing tStory's work as a sculptor, and art as well as life in Italy were refreshing topics of conversation. In the summer and autumn Sumner had his usual reunions with Longfellow at Nahant and Cambridge. One was a dinner at the Craigie House, where Burlingame, Palfrey, and Dana, all original Free-Soilers, assisted. Longfellow's Life, vol. II. pp. 424, 425, 429.
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 52: Tenure-of-office act.—equal suffrage in the District of Columbia, in new states, in territories, and in reconstructed states.—schools and homesteads for the Freedmen.—purchase of Alaska and of St. Thomas.—death of Sir Frederick Bruce.—Sumner on Fessenden and Edmunds.—the prophetic voices.—lecture tour in the West.—are we a nation?1866-1867. (search)
a judge. July 19, 1867 (Works, vol. XI. p. 421), and offered resolutions affirming the right, ,July 20 (Globe, pp. 429, 430). The current of feeling in Congress during this session and the first session of the Fortieth Congress in the following summer was running in favor of the impeachment; but the country was as yet opposed to a resort to this extraordinary remedy for Executive misdoing. C. G. Loring and E. L. Pierce so wrote to Sumner in the winter and spring. Sumner wrote to W. W. Story, Dec. 16, 1866:— I wish you might make a statue of Lincoln. He is an historic character, worthy of bronze and marble. I do not give up the Shaw statue. Congress is doing pretty well; every step is forward. The next Congress, which will probably meet on the 4th of March, will be still better inspired. All that is possible will be done to limit the Executive power. It is possible that the President may be impeached. If we go forward and supersede the sham governments set up
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 56: San Domingo again.—the senator's first speech.—return of the angina pectoris.—Fish's insult in the Motley Papers.— the senator's removal from the foreign relations committee.—pretexts for the remioval.—second speech against the San Domingo scheme.—the treaty of Washington.—Sumner and Wilson against Butler for governor.—1870-1871. (search)
in vain. Seward wished it as a preserve for one of his friends. At last, two years ago, I was able to stop this appropriation, and I have refused to allow it since. My reason was that it was to fortify the Italian government at Florence, and not to strengthen the temporal power of the Pope. Within a few weeks I have received a communication from M. Menabrea, thanking me in the name of the Italian government. I am glad that you agree with me. He closed, Sept. 15, 1870, a letter to W. W. Story thus— Meanwhile Italy ascends in her career, and Rome is at last the capital. Is not the Church falling gradually, never to rise? Clearly it is a widespread anachronism. He wrote to Bemis, Jan. 18, 1871:— Sir John Rose is here with proposals, or rather to sound our government. The English pray for settlement as never before. Mr. Fish has asked my judgment. I have sent him a memorandum, in which I have said: A discrimination in favor of claims arising from the depredat
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