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James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 84 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 20 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 14 2 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 1 1 Browse Search
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all. C. E. Stowe. After her husband's departure for the United States, Mrs. Stowe, with her son Henry, her two eldest daughters, and her sister Mary (Mrs. Perklands. Of this visit we catch a pleasant glimpse from a letter written to Professor Stowe during its continuance, which is as follows:-- Inverary Castle, Septemberly yours, Harriet. From Dunrobin Castle one of his daughters writes to Professor Stowe: We spent five most delightful days at Inverary, and were so sorry yrriage dashed off towards the castle, we following on behind. At Dunrobin Mrs. Stowe found awaiting her the following note from her friend, Lady Byron:-- London, September 10, 1856. Your book, dear Mrs. Stowe, is of the little leaven kind, and must prove a great moral force,--perhaps not manifestly so much as secretly, andours affectionately, A. T. Noel Byron. From this pleasant abiding-place Mrs. Stowe writes to her husband:-- Dunrobin Castle, September 15, 1856. My dear hus
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe, Chapter 15: the third trip to Europe, 1859. (search)
nd H. and E. and H. B. all well and happy; and on the 30th of August we all went to Geneva together, and to-day, the 1st of September, we all took a sail up the beautiful Lake Leman here in the midst of the Alps, close by the old castle of Chillon, about which Lord Byron has written a poem. In a day or two we shall go to Chamouni, and then Georgie and I will go back to Paris and London, and so home at the time appointed. Until then I remain as ever, Your loving father, C. E. Stowe. Mrs. Stowe accompanied her husband and daughter to England, where, after traveling and visiting for two weeks, she bade them good-by and returned to her daughters in Switzerland. From Lausanne she writes under date of October 9th: My dear husband,--Here we are at Lausanne, in the Hotel Gibbon, occupying the very parlor that the Ruskins had when we were here before. The day I left you I progressed prosperously to Paris. Reached there about one o'clock at night; could get no carriage, and fina
ld-fashioned stage-coach, to enter upon a professorship in Dartmouth College, I was perfectly dissolved by it. Sincerely yours, C. E. Stowe. In a letter to Mrs. Stowe, written June 24, 1872, Mrs. Lewes alludes to Professor Stowe's letter as follows: Pray give my special thanks to the professor for his letter. His handwProfessor Stowe's letter as follows: Pray give my special thanks to the professor for his letter. His handwriting, which does really look like Arabic,--a very graceful character, surely,hap-pens to be remarkably legible to me, and I did not hesitate over a single word. Some of the words, as expressions of fellowship, were very precious to me, and I hold it very good of him to write to me that best sort of encouragement. I was much impal stimulus. In fact, the division between within and without in this sense seems to become every year a more subtle and bewildering problem. In 1834, while Mr. Stowe was a professor in Lane Theological Seminary at Cincinnati, Ohio, he wrote out a history of his youthful adventures in the spirit-world, from which the followin
y G. E. Woodberry, 2 volumes (1909). Whitman, Leaves of Grass and Complete prose works (Small, Maynard and Co.) (1897, 1898), also John Burroughs, A study of Whitman (1896). Chapter 9. C. Schurz, Life of Henry Clay, 2 volumes (1887). Daniel Webster, Works, 6 volumes (1851), Life by H. C. Lodge (1883). Rufus Choate, Works, 2 volumes (1862). Wendell Phillips, Speeches, lectures, and letters, 2 volumes (1892). V. L. Garrison, The story of his life told by his children, 4 volumes (1885-1889). Harriet Beecher Stowe, Works, 17 volumes (1897), Life by C. E. Stowe (1889). Abraham Lincoln, Works, 2 volumes (edited by Nicolay and Hay, 1894). Chapter 10. For an excellent bibliography of the New National Period, see F. L. Pattee, A history of American literature since 1870 (1916). For further bibliographical information the reader is referred to the articles on American authors in The Encyclopedia Britannica and in The Warner Library (volume 30, The student's course, N. Y., 1917).
99 Democratic review, 199 Dial, 136, 140 Drake, J. R., 107 Drama, American, in the 20th century, 259-60 Dred, Stowe 223 Drum Taps, Whitman 201 Dwight, Timothy, 69 Edict of the King of Prussia against England, Franklin 58 Edinburgal Odes, Lowell 172 Miller, C. H. (Joaquin), 244 Minister's black Veil, the, Hawthorne 30 Minister's Wooing, the, Stowe 22 Modern instance, a, Howells 251 Montcalm and Wolfe, Parkman 185 Moody, W. V., 257 Morituri Salutamus, Longfell Old Manse, 119-20, 145 Old Regime, the, Parkman 185 Old Swimmina Hole, the, Riley 247 Oldtown fireside stories, Stowe 223 Oldtown Folks, Stowe 223 Olmsted, F. L., 246 On a certain Condescension in Foreigners, Lowell 174 Oratory in Stowe 223 Olmsted, F. L., 246 On a certain Condescension in Foreigners, Lowell 174 Oratory in America, 208 et seq. Oregon Trail, the, Parkman 184 Otis, James, 72, 73 Our hundred days, Holmes 168 Outcast of Poker Flat, the, Harte 242 Outre-mer, Longfellow 152 Overland monthly, 240 Page, T. N., 246, 247 Paine, Thomas, 74-7
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Harriet Beecher Stowe. (search)
from her pursuers of a poor colored girl by Mrs. Stowe's husband and her brother Charles, who, trusits prosperity, finding his health failing, Prof. Stowe retired to accept a professorship in Bowdoi this wonderful book was actually written by Mrs. Stowe, as she sat, with her portfolio upon her kne It was offered to him, and he remarked to Prof. Stowe that it would bring his wife something handad it been treated with equal ability, would Mrs. Stowe have attained equal success. On the other h enveloped and concealed its real features. Mrs. Stowe treated the subject, not as a question of la line of the narrative. In the year 1852, Mrs. Stowe took up her residence in Andover, Massachuseation of The minister's Wooing in book-form, Mrs. Stowe visited Europe again, sojourning for the moswhich the pretty Pearl grew. For many years Mrs. Stowe has been one of the able corps of writers whe and abroad. The Queer little people, whom Mrs. Stowe described to the readers of Our young folks,[32 more...]
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier, Index. (search)
Thomas, 52. Sigourney, Mrs. L. H., 35; Whittier's letter to, 37, 38. Sims, Thomas, case of, 46. Sisters, the, 145-147. Smalley, George W., 94. Smith, Mary Emerson, the object of Whittier's poem Memo ries, 137, 138. Snow-bound, quoted, 6,8-13. Southampton, England, 4. South Carolina, 60, 115. Stanton, Henry B., 77. Stedman, Edmund C., 185; his opinion of Whittier, 154-157. Sterne, Laurence, 37, 103, 179. Stetson, Mr., 59. Stoddard, R. H., 178. Story, W. W., 178. Stowe, Dr. C. E., 104. Stowe, Harriet Beecher, 104; acquaintance with Whittier, 112. Sumner, Charles, 44, 46, 47, 102, 103; elected to U. S. Senate, 45. Swift, Jonathan, 94, 103. T. Tennyson, Alfred, 36, 142, 152; on Whittier's My Playmate, 141. Thaxter, Mrs., Celia, Whittier at home of, 127, 128, 179. Thayer, Abijah W., 27, 42, 88; tries to publish Whittier's poems, 29; Whittier's letter to, 32, 33; supports Whittier, 41. Thayer, Professor James B., 88. Thomas, Judge, 137, 138
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 30: addresses before colleges and lyceums.—active interest in reforms.—friendships.—personal life.—1845-1850. (search)
spute. An illustrated edition of the White Slavery was published in March, 1853, Published by John P. Jewett & Co., with original designs by Billings. The lecture was reviewed in the London Athenaeum, April 16, 1853. . at the instance of Mrs. Stowe, who had become interested in it while preparing her Key to Uncle Tom's Cabin. She wrote, Nov. 7, 1852:— Last evening I sat up and read with breathless interest your Algerine Slavery. It appears to me to be fitted to a high class of mind,to build the great fabric higher yet! Sumner's friends often submitted their manuscripts or first proofs to him, and they came back so changed that the authors could hardly identify their own compositions. He read, in 1853, the proofs to Mrs. Stowe's Key to Uncle Tom's Cabin. Those much younger than himself submitted to this rough handling; others rose in insurrection against his severe canons of criticism. He cut to pieces a lecture which Horace Mann sent him for revision, and an impart
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 36: first session in Congress.—welcome to Kossuth.—public lands in the West.—the Fugitive Slave Law.—1851-1852. (search)
saic and commonplace. Soule was a brilliant man, the one brilliant representative of the South and Southwest. He had been a partisan of freedom in the Old World, as he would probably have been in the New but for his slaveholding environment. Mrs. Stowe recognized in him the impersonation of nobility and chivalry, and even hoped that he might become the Southern leader of emancipation. Letter to Sumner, Dec. 21, 1852. The mass of the senators did not in original faculties or training orcruelty in capture and detention, and assaults fatal to the pursuer or the pursued. He spoke of the dehumanizing effects of the law on the agents of the claimants, on commissioners and marshals engaged in its execution; referred in passing to Mrs. Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin, recently issued, noting that its marvellous reception expressed the true public sentiment outside of the mercantile interest; and then paid a tribute to fugitive slaves, whose cause, spite of legal commands and penalties, a
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 39: the debate on Toucey's bill.—vindication of the antislavery enterprise.—first visit to the West.—defence of foreign-born citizens.—1854-1855. (search)
hearty thanks—for that masterly lecture of last Thursday evening. It is not easy to tell you how much I, in common with the great multitude, was enlightened and gratified. No one left the house that evening, I venture to say, without a conviction, never to be removed from his mind, that the antislavery enterprise was most truly necessary, practicable, and dignified. Coming out I met Mr. Garrison, who said, Well, Mr. Sumner has given us a true, old-fashioned antislavery discourse. Rev. C. E. Stowe wrote, April 9:— You are happy in having stood for the cause at the lowest point of depression and in the imminent deadly breach. The Lord give you many days and the strength corresponding! Oliver Johnson wrote from New York, July 9:— People here have not forgotten the triumph of last May. You made a deeper impression in this city, I believe, than it was ever the good fortune of any other antislavery speaker to make,—an impression that will last till the final jubilee
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