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413 ShipClara WheelerSprague & James'sJ. TaylorBramhall & HoweBoston999 414 BarkEllaSprague & James'sJ. TaylorWilliam FlynnBoston233 415 ShipSquantumSprague & James'sJ. T. FosterThomas B. Wales & Co.Boston651 416 ShipTirrellSprague & James'sJ. T. FosterJ. & A. TirrellBoston967 417 BarkFenelonJ. O. Curtis'sJ. O. CurtisW. F. Weld & Co.Boston385 418 BarkSarah H. SnowJ. O. Curtis'sJ. O. CurtisSnow & RichBoston425 419 ShipAnna RichJ. O. Curtis'sJ. O. CurtisSnow & RichBoston670 420 ShipWm. SturgisJ. O. Curtis'sJ. O. CurtisW. F. Weld & Co.Boston700 421 ShipHumboldtP. Curtis'sP. CurtisW. F. Weld & Co.Boston716 422 ShipWestern StarP. Curtis'sP. CurtisB. BangsBoston850 423 ShipSamuel AppletonP. Curtis'sP. CurtisD. P. ParkerBoston808 424 Sch.FillmoreT. Magoun'sHayden & CudworthJ. D. CrockerYarmouth70 425 ShipAustraliaT. Magoun'sHayden & CudworthSilsbee & StoneSalem557 426 ShipManliusT. Magoun'sHayden & CudworthMagoun & SonBoston701 427 ShipRevereT. Magoun'sHayden & Cudwor
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Loring, Charles Greeley 1794-1868 (search)
Loring, Charles Greeley 1794-1868 Lawyer; born in Boston, Mass., May 2, 1794; graduated at Harvard College in 1812. He was the author of Neutral relations between the United States and England, and Life of William Sturgis. He died in Beverly, Mass., Oct. 8, 1868.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Missouri, (search)
joined (June 20) by 400 men under Colonel O'Kane, who had just captured and dispersed about the same number of the loyal Missouri Home Guards. The governor and his followers continued their flight to the extreme southwestern corner of Missouri, where he was joined by General Price, when the whole Confederate force amounted to full 3,000 men. At the same time Gen. J. G. Rains, a graduate of West Point, was hurrying forward to join Jackson with a considerable force, closely pursued by Major Sturgis, with a body of Kansas volunteers. Jackson was now satisfied that the whole of northern Missouri was lost to the cause of secession, and he endeavored to concentrate all the armed disloyal citizens, with McCulloch's men, in the southwestern part of the commonwealth. Assured by the aspect of affairs, and conciliatory and assuring proclamations from both General Lyon and Colonel Boernstein, the people became quieted, and the loyal State convention was called to assemble at Jefferson City
John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison, Chapter 5: the crisis (search)
by the prayers of Puritans, and the blood of patriots, the earth should have yawned and swallowed him up. (Applause and hisses, with cries of Take that back! ) The uproar became so great that for a time no one could be heard. At length the Hon. William Sturgis came to Mr. Phillips's side at the front of the platform. He was met with cries of Phillips or nobody, Make him take back recreant; he shan't go on till he takes it back. When it was understood that Mr. Sturgis meant to sustain, not toMr. Sturgis meant to sustain, not to interrupt Mr. Phillips, he was listened to and said, I did not come here to take part in this discussion, nor do I intend to; but I do entreat you, fellow citizens, by everything you hold sacred,--I conjure you by every association connected with this Hall, consecrated by our Fathers to freedom of discussion,that you listen to every man who addresses you in a decorous manner. Phillips resumed his speech and made in this, his debut, one of the best remembered triumphs in a life of oratory. Hi
John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison, Index (search)
vered by Abolitionists, 188; complicity of churches with, 200; Emerson and, 228; history of, review, 253 if.; influence of, North and South, 254. And see Colonization Society, Crandall, P., Lane Seminary, Lovejoy, E. P. Slavery in West Indies, abolition of, 244. Smith, Goldwin, 251. South Carolina, 23, 137. Spencer, Herbert, 251. Sprague, Peleg, quoted, 95, 96; at Faneuil Hall, IiO, III. Storrs, George, 107, 108. Stowe, Harriet Beecher, Uncle Tom's Cabin, 120, 187, 188. Sturgis, William, 132. Sumner, Charles, 123, 140. Sumter, Fort, fired on, 259. Taney, Roger B., 140. Tappan, Arthur, 47, 67, 72,106, 107. Taylor, Zachary, 200, 209, 210, 21I. Texas, Annexation of, 138, 139, 155, 174, 238, 256. Thatcher, Judge, 50. Thompson, George, in U. S., 92 ff.; S. J. May and Sprague quoted on, 93-96; what he stood for, 96; plot to tar and feather, 113; 107, 118, 227, 245,247, 251. Ticknor, George, 199. Tocsin of Liberty, the, quoted, 178. Todd, Francis, libeled
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, The murder of Lovejoy. (search)
the dead. [Great applause and counter applause.] The gentleman said that he should sink into insignificance if he dared to gainsay the principles of these resolutions. Sir, for the sentiments he has uttered, on soil consecrated by the prayers of Puritans and the blood of patriots, the earth should have yawned and swallowed him up. [Applause and hisses, with cries of Take that back. The uproar been so great that for a long time no one could be heard. At length G. Bond, Esq., and Hon. W. Sturgis came to Mr. Phillips's side at th front of the platform. They were met with cries of Phillips or nobody, Make him take back recreant, He sha'n't go on till he takes it back. When it was understood they meant to sustain, not to interrupt, Mr. Phillips, Mr. Sturgis was listened to, and said: I did not come here to take any part in this discussion, nor do I intend to; but I do entreat you, fellow-citizens, by everything you hold sacred.-I conjure you by every association connected with
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 19 (search)
so-called leaders of public opinion against us,--literature, fashion, prejudice of race, and present interest. It is the uprising of common sense, the protest of common conscience, the untaught, instinctive loyalty of the people to justice and right. But you will tell me of dark clouds, mobs in every Northern city. Grant it, and more. When Lovejoy was shot at Alton, Illinois, while defending his press, and his friends were refused the use of Faneuil Hall, William Ellery Channing, William Sturgis, and George Bond, the saints and merchants of Boston, rallied to the defence of free speech. Now we hold meetings only when and how the Mayor permits [hisses and great applause], yet no merchant prince, no pulpit hero, rallies to our side. But raise your eyes from the disgraced pavements of Boston, and look out broader. That same soil which drank the blood of Lovejoy now sends his brother to lead Congress in its fiercest hour; that same prairie lifts his soul's son to crush the Unio
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 14: first weeks in London.—June and July, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
e Point. He wriggled round, played with his hat, seemed unable to dispose of his hands or his feet; his voice was small and thin, but notwithstanding all this, a house of upwards of five hundred members was hushed to catch his slightest accents. You listened, and you felt that you heard a man of mind, of thought, and of moral elevation. Shell Richard Lalor Sheil, 1793-1851. then broke forth with one of his splendid bursts, full of animation in the extreme; in gesture and glow like William Sturgis; 1782-1863; a merchant of Boston. in voice, I should think, like John Randolph. He screamed and talked in octaves, and yet the House listened and the cheers ensued. Sir Edward Sugden 1781-1875; author of law treatises on Vendors and Purchasers and Powers; entered Parliament in 1828; Solicitor-Genera in 1829; Lord Chancellor of Ireland, 1834-35 and 1841-46; and, in 1852, Lord Chancellor of Great Britain, with the title of Baron St. Leonards. tried to speak, but calls of question, d
members of this community, but certain incipient steps towards the putting of such designs in execution had been taken, some years, at least, prior to the actual result now well known to the public. The earliest meeting on the subject of the Cemetery, so far as we have been able to ascertain, was held in November, 1825, at the house and by the instance of our respected fellow-citizen, Dr. Jacob Bigelow, on which occasion were present with himself Messrs. John Lowell, George Bond, William Sturgis, Thomas W. Ward, Samuel P. Gardiner, John Tappan and Nathan Hale. The design of a Cemetery somewhere in the vicinity of the city met with unanimous approval, and Messrs. Bond and Tappan were appointed a Committee to make enquiries, and report a suitable piece of ground for the purpose. The Committee were unsuccessful in their enquiries, and never reported, nor was the subject ever actively revived in any way by these immediate parties. The next movement was in 1830, when Dr. Bigelo
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 5: more changes--1886-1888; aet. 67-69 (search)
p and instruction, and other dear and valued friends, notably Sarah Shaw Russell, Mrs. George Russell, widow of the Doctor's friend and college chum. Abby W. May and Carrie Tappan. Caroline Tappan was Caroline Sturgis, daughter of Captain William Sturgis, and sister of Ellen (Sturgis) Hooper,--member of the inmost Transcendentalist circle, and friend of Emerson, Ellery Channing, and Margaret Fuller. I desire to set my house in order, and be ready for my departure; thankful to live, or wily Sarah Shaw Russell, Mrs. George Russell, widow of the Doctor's friend and college chum. Abby W. May and Carrie Tappan. Caroline Tappan was Caroline Sturgis, daughter of Captain William Sturgis, and sister of Ellen (Sturgis) Hooper,--member of the inmost Transcendentalist circle, and friend of Emerson, Ellery Channing, and Margaret Fuller. I desire to set my house in order, and be ready for my departure; thankful to live, or willing to cease from my mortal life when God so wills. . .
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