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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The First shot against the flag. (search)
eply in writing: Fort Sumter, S. C., April 12, 1861-3.20 A. M. Sir: By authority of Brigadier General Beauregard, commanding the Provisional forces of the Confederate States, we have the honor to notify you that he will open the fire of his batteries upon Fort Sumter in one hour from this time. We have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servants, James Chesnut, Jr., Aide-de-camp. Stephen D. Lee, Captain C. S. and A. D. C. To Major Robert Anderson, U. S. A., commanding Fort Sumter. Positive instructions from the Confederate Government had been sent to their agent in Charleston harbor that if this last proposition to Major Anderson was refused by him, he should reduce the fort as his judgment decided to be most practicable. But little conversation followed the delivery, to the aides, of the reply of Major Anderson. An inquiry as to the exact time in the morning was made, which was found to be 3.30 A. M. The Confederate officers left the fort without a
ic chords of memory, stretching from every battle-field and patriot grave to every living heart and hearthstone all over this broad land, will yet swell the chorus of the Union, when again touched, as surely they will be, by the better angels of our nature. But the peaceful policy here outlined was already more difficult to follow than Mr. Lincoln was aware. On the morning after inauguration the Secretary of War brought to his notice freshly received letters from Major Anderson, commanding Fort Sumter in Charleston harbor, announcing that in the course of a few weeks the provisions of the garrison would be exhausted, and therefore an evacuation or surrender would become necessary, unless the fort were relieved by supplies or reinforcements; and this information was accompanied by the written opinions of the officers that to relieve the fort would require a well-appointed army of twenty thousand men. The new President had appointed as his cabinet William H. Seward, Secretary of
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The army before Charleston in 1863. (search)
places both on the sea and channel faces completely torn away from the terre-plein. The place, in fine, was a ruin, and effectually disabled for any immediate defense of the harbor of Charleston. Having accomplished the end proposed, orders were accordingly issued on the evening of the 23d for the firing to cease, having been continuously sustained for seven days. There had been thrown 5009 projectiles, of which about one-half had struck the fort. Colonel Alfred Rhett, C. S. A., commanding Fort Sumter, reports, August 24th, One 11-inch Dahlgren, east face, the only gun serviceable ; and on September 1st, We have not a gun en barbette that can be fired; only one gun and casemate. General Stephen Elliott, C. S. A., writes as follows: When I assumed command of Fort Sumter on the 4th of September, 1863, there were no guns in position except one 32-pounder in one of the north-west casemates. This gun was merely used for firing at sunset, and was not intended for any other purpo
received from the officers in charge of the works, but more particularly from the observations of Colonel Rhett, commanding Fort Sumter, and Lieutenant S. C. Boyleston, Adjutant First regiment South Carolina artillery, who made special observations ds on board. The enemy was observed from Battery Wagner building a work at their extreme left. Colonel Rhett, commanding Fort Sumter; Captain Mitchell, commanding Battery Simkins, and Captain Lesesne, commanding Battery Gregg, directed their firemay give no annoyance early to-morrow. Make the best, at least. Thomas Jourdan, Chief of Staff. General Ripley, Commanding Fort Sumter. Charleston, S. C., July 19, 1863--1 A. M. Brigadier-General R. S. Ripley, Fort Sumter: Morris Island must be S. C: The steamboats to take position near the south edge of the channel, and about midway between Forts Johnson and Sumter. Small boats to ply between steamers and Cummins' Point; should steamboats be driven from their position, must go to Fort
C., April 12, 1861, 3:20 A. M. sir: By authority of Brigadier-General Beauregard, commanding the provisional forces of the Confederate States, we have the honor to notify you that he will open the fire of his batteries on Fort Sumter in one hour from this time. We have the honor to be, very respectfully, Your obedient servants, (Signed) James Chesnut, Jr., Aide-de-camp. (Signed) Stephen D. Lee, Captain S. C. Army, and Aide-de-camp. Major Robert Anderson, United States Army, commanding Fort Sumter. It is essential to a right understanding of the last two letters to give more than a superficial attention to that of Major Anderson, bearing in mind certain important facts not referred to in the correspondence. Major Anderson had been requested to state the time at which he would evacuate the fort, if unmolested, agreeing in the meantime not to use his guns against the city and the troops defending it unless Fort Sumter should be first attacked by them. On these conditions G
. Your position in this harbor has been tolerated by the authorities of the State. And, while the act of which you complain is in perfect consistency with the rights and duties of the State, it is not perceived how far the conduct which you propose to adopt can find a parallel in the history of any country, or be reconciled with any other purpose of your Government than that of imposing upon this State the condition of a conquered province. F. W. Pickens. To Major Robert Anderson, commanding Fort Sumter. Major Anderson to the Governor Headquarters, Fort Sumter, South Carolina, January 9, 1861. To his Excellency F. W. Pickens, Governor of the State of South Carolina. sir: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of to-day, and to say that, under the circumstances, I have deemed it proper to refer the whole matter to my Government; and that I intend deferring the course indicated in my note of this morning until the arrival from Washington of the inst
A. Fort Sumter, S. C. April 12, 1861, 3.20 A. M. Sir: By authority of Brigadier-General Beauregard, commanding the Provisional Forces of the Confederate States, we have the honor to notify you that he will open the fire of his batteries on Fort Sumter in one hour from this time. We have the honor to be, very respectfully, Your obedient servants, James Chesnut, jr. Aide-de-Camp. Stephen D. Lee, Captain S. C. Army and Aide-de-Camp. Major Robert Anderson, United States Army, Commanding Fort Sumter. --Charleston Mercury,April 19. --Times,April 18. The bombardment. On Thursday the demand to surrender the fort was made and declined, all the officers having been consulted by Major Anderson in regard to the summons. At about 3 o'clock on Friday morning notice was given us that fire would be opened on us in one hour unless the demand to surrender was instantly complied with. Major Anderson resolved not to return fire until broad daylight, not wishing to waste any of hi
ston, S. C., April 9th, 1863. Major D. B. Harris, Chief-Engineer Department: Major,—I have the honor to make the following report of the engagement between Fort Sumter and the enemy's ironclad fleet, on the 7th of April, 1863, at 3 o'clock P. M., lasting two hours and twenty-five minutes. The incidents which transpired during the engagement are based upon information received from the officers in charge of the works, but more particularly from the observations of Colonel Rhett, commanding Fort Sumter, and Lieutenant S. C. Boyleston, Adjutant, First Regiment South Carolina Artillery, who made special observations during the whole action; the remainder from personal inspection afterwards. Forts Sumter, Moultrie, batteries Bee, Beauregard, Cummings's Point, and Wagner, were engaged. The fleet consisted of the Ironsides, supposed armament sixteen guns; the Keokuk, two stationary turrets, carrying one gun each; and seven single revolving turreted vessels, carrying (supposed) two g
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
of President James Madison, and that of President Zachary Taylor, and a son of Col. Thomas Taylor, a native of Amelia county, Va., who in his youth moved to South Carolina, and later held the rank of colonel in the South Carolina troops under General Sumter during the Revolution. Col. A. R. Taylor was graduated at the South Carolina college in 1830 and then became a planter, his occupation, except as he served his State, until his death in December, 1888. He was a private in 1836 in the Florid daughter. Captain Samuel E. White, a prominent citizen of Fort Mill, S. C., was born February 22, 1837, son of William Elliott and Sarah (Wilson) White. He is a grandson of Joseph White, of Lancaster county, who commanded a company under General Sumter in the Revolution, who was a son of Stephen White, a native of Ireland. He was educated at the Citadel academy, afterward traveled in Texas and Mexico for two years. Returning home in 1860, he with three brothers organized a company of volun
yards.36Turret disabled for one day; not in good order for one month. 1 Xi-inch44 Keokuk 2 Xi-inch3550 yards.90Totally disabled; sunk next day off Morris Island. Vessels, 9; guns in action, 23; fires, 139; range, from 500 to 2,100 yards: fuses for shells cut for flights of from 8% to 15 seconds; charges: XV-inch, 35 pounds; Xi-inch, 15 to 20 pounds; rifles, 46 pounds. Moultrie received 12 shots, Wagner 2, Sumter the remainder, which was struck 55 times. note.—Colonel Rhett. commanding Fort Sumter, reports that no monitor approached nearer than 1,000 yards; the Keokuk to within 900 yards; Ironsides, 1,700 yards. Beauregard reports that the fleet did not come nearer than 1,100 yards to outer batteries, save the Keokuk, which drifted to within 900 yards of Sumter. Engineer Echols reports nearest approach of monitors, 900 yards ; of Ironsides to Moultrie, 1,700 yards, and to Sumter, 2,000 yards. Iii—return of guns and mortars at forts and batteries in Charleston Harbor enga
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