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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 12., One of Medford's historic houses. (search)
One of Medford's historic houses. Of the house of Jonathan Watson, Mr. Swan wrote quite fully as follows:— About 1750, he built the house next west of the First Parish Church, now (1857) occupied by the family of Capt. Samuel Swan. It hCapt. Samuel Swan. It had only two rooms and two chambers Mr Watson gave the east half of the house to his son Jonathan and the west half to his widowed daughter Abigail—Mrs Samuel Angier (m. 29. Apr. 1762) Mrs Angier kept a children's school in the West room Mr James Floe, as he was sure Mr Bigelow would have given it. In the spring of 1813 Mr Blanchard sold his half of the house to Capt. Samuel Swan, who bought the west half of Mrs Tarbett at the same time. Capt Swan's family has continued to live there till ting of 1813 Mr Blanchard sold his half of the house to Capt. Samuel Swan, who bought the west half of Mrs Tarbett at the same time. Capt Swan's family has continued to live there till the present time. They moved into the house 17th Feb 1
e was laid entirely aside from life's activities and for twenty-two years was an invalid, shut — in and helpless. Mrs. Samuel Swan, one of Marm Betty's scholars, who was placed in her charge when less than two years old, and was but eight when theizabeth died, retained a vivid recollection of both. Over fifty years ago, on the first day of her seventy-ninth year, Mrs. Swan wrote:— I have often heard my grandmother tell of the pride and lofty carriage of this Miss Usher. They lived in reis evident. After fifty-two years the Register publishes for the first time (so far as is known) the words written by Mr. Swan soon after the receipt of the letter alluded to. The daughter would take up her aged, infirm mother, as one would d. April, 1867, ae. 89. Governor Brooks always treated Miss Francis with great kindness and polite attention. Mrs. Samuel Swan supplied her with coffee for roasting for several years before 1823. Marm Betty must have filled a worthy place