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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 6 0 Browse Search
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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.17 (search)
ices and follies, which clung to their uneducated natures, were the source of great trouble; though there were brave virtues in most of them, which atoned for much that appeared incorrigible. Wellington is reported to have said that he never knew a good-tempered man in India; and Sydney Smith thought that sweetness of temper was impossible in a very cold or a very hot climate. With such authorities it is somewhat bold, perhaps, to disagree; but after experiences of Livingstone, Pocock, Swinburne, Surgeon Parke, and other white men, one must not take these remarks too literally. As for my black followers, no quality was so conspicuous and unvarying as good-temper; and I think that, since I had more occasion to praise my black followers than blame them, even I must surely take credit for being more often good-tempered than bad; and besides, I felt great compassion for them. How often the verse in the Psalms recurred to me: Like as a father pitieth his own children ! It was on m
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.20 (search)
nces, is the failures among the men sent out from Europe as his assistants. There were many and honourable exceptions, and these he praises warmly in the book. The Congo, and the Founding of its Free State. Such were the Scotch engineer, Binnie, who so stoutly held his solitary post at Stanley Falls; the efficient and fine-spirited Danish sailor, Albert Christopherson; the Scandinavian seaman, Captain Anderson, with his genius for inspiring everyone near him to work; the Englishman, A. B. Swinburne, with a genius for gardening and home-making, and for winning the affection of both whites and blacks; the Italian mechanician, Francois Flamini, who charmed the steam-engines into docility. But the book tells often of the failures, and the private note-books detail the story more plainly, and tell, too, something of his difficulties with his native helpers. All the officers, before I sent them to their posts, were instructed by me, orally and in writing, in the very minutiae of th
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, Index (search)
struction to Stanley, 128-133, 137-139; his religious views, 133-137; the further education he gives Stanley, 140; his adventure with a thief, 141; his last parting with Stanley, 142-144; sends a letter to Stanley, 145, 146; death of, 161. Stanley, Mrs., of New Orleans, 99-101, 111-113. Stanley-Cook exploration in Asia, 223, 224. Stanley Falls, 326. Stanley Pool, 329, 336. Stead, W. T., 455, 456. Story, Newton, 156, 165, 169, 170, 180, 193. Suez Canal, opening of, 245. Swinburne, A. B., 345. Syra, Island of, 230-236. Talbot, A., 456, 458. Tanganyika, Lake, 261, 262, 318, 319. Tanner, Dr., 468, 469, 473-475. Tasmania, Stanley visits, 434, 437, 438. Tay-pay, 475, 476. Taylor, Commissioner, 227. Teheran, 247. Tennant, Dorothy, married to Stanley, 423. See Stanley, Lady. Theodore, King, 229, 230. Thomas, Captain, Leigh, 17. Tiflis, 246. Tippu-Tib, 319-325, 364. Tomasson, 169, 180, 184. Tremeirchion, 42, 51. Uganda, 309-313, 405. Ugand