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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 91 5 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 52 2 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 40 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 33 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 27 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 27 1 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 24 4 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 24 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 23 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert. You can also browse the collection for Walter H. Taylor or search for Walter H. Taylor in all documents.

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Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Chapter 9: Malvern Hill and the effect of the Seven Days battles (search)
ood result. But I cannot give a fairer or better idea of our view of the battle than by quoting from pages 48, 49 of Colonel Taylor's admirable book: From these extracts I think it will be clear to the candid reader that the retreat to the Jamesss of artillery concentrated, as the Federal guns at Malvern Hill were, upon very short attacking lines of infantry. Colonel Taylor says divisions were marched forward at different times, each attacking independently and each in turn repulsed. I thto Lee, notwithstanding his successful defense at Malvern Hill. The matter will be found circumstantially set out in Colonel Taylor's book, pages 41-44, substantiated and confirmed by a full extract from General Stuart's manuscript of Reports and nost as I have reason to believe, had never been in the region before. Yet, once more. Stuart, glorious Stuart, as Colonel Taylor justly calls him, while his boyish indiscretion in firing into the huddled masses of the enemy from Evelington Height