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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 20 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 17 1 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 14 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 14 0 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 8 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 7 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life. You can also browse the collection for Tennyson or search for Tennyson in all documents.

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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 2: a Keats manuscript (search)
same lucky spell is attributed to a piece from the bride's garter, in Normandy, or to pins filched from her dress, in Sussex. For those more cultivated, the charm of this transmitted personality is best embodied in autographs, and the more unstudied and unpremeditated the better. In the case of a poet, nothing can be compared with the interest inspired by the first draft of a poem, with its successive amendments — the path by which his thought attained its final and perfect utterance. Tennyson, it is reported, was very indignant with those who bore away from his study certain rough drafts of poems, justly holding that the world had no right to any but the completed form. Yet this is what, as students of poetry, we all instinctively wish to do. Rightly or wrongly, we long to trace the successive steps. To some extent, the same opportunity is given in successive editions of the printed work, but here the study is not so much of changes in the poet's own mind as of those produced
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 7: a very moral and nice book (search)
, the historian proved never to have heard of either the man or the book. A friend of mine, visiting Stoke Pogis last year, had pointed out to her by the verger the grave of the American poet, Thomas Gray. A young English girl of eighteen, just arrived in this country, and looking at the name of Thackeray on my book-shelf, remarked, He is one of your American novelists, is he not? And a well-known Canadian statesman told me that a London maiden had just made to him a similar remark about Tennyson. Yet the least probable of these anecdotes, or the joint improbability of all put together, is brought within the domain of reasonable credibility by the announcement that Mr. Lang is just reading the Waverley Novels, or any one of them, for the first time. For this author, it must be remembered, is proud to proclaim himself a child of the Tweed; and though his severest foes, like Mr. Robert Buchanan, may pronounce him a cockney of cockneys, they are compelled to admit in the same b
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 15: the cant of cosmopolitanism (search)
the bearing of a lord and the figure of a guardsman. In the same way Lady Eastlake describes Motley's visible annoyance at being constantly addressed as Milord at German hotels; and I knew a Boston lady, going abroad for the first time after middle life, who was identified for her husband by the Suisse at a crowded cathedral, where they had got separated, as the lady with a grand air. What we all need to teach our children is that manners are not a matter of veneering, but ingrain. In Tennyson's phrase: Kind nature's are the best; those next to best That fit us like a nature second-hand, Which are indeed the manners of the great. It is possible, in other words, to have better manners than those of the merely great, by having a surer foundation. Why not strike for the best? Self-respect, self-control, kind feeling, refined habits-these are the basis. If, in addition to these, one happens to inherit an agreeable voice and a good intonation, what more is essential? The trivi
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 29: acts of homage (search)
s and Bret Harte would have developed more lasting power had they remained at home. Transplanting helps tulips, but it is a doubtful aid to human intellects. Why is it not as great a thing to be fellow-countrymen of Emerson and Hawthorne as of Tennyson and Browning? Even of these last names, it is to be remembered that Tennyson lived the life of a recluse, and Browning lived so much out of England that the fact was urged strongly by a brother author, James Payn, as a source of objection to hiasting power had they remained at home. Transplanting helps tulips, but it is a doubtful aid to human intellects. Why is it not as great a thing to be fellow-countrymen of Emerson and Hawthorne as of Tennyson and Browning? Even of these last names, it is to be remembered that Tennyson lived the life of a recluse, and Browning lived so much out of England that the fact was urged strongly by a brother author, James Payn, as a source of objection to his being buried in Westminster Abbey. 1896
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 31: the prejudice in favor of retiracy (search)
and all to some extent succeed; all readily admit that a page or two of personal gossip about them would help their market, yet all with one accord make excuse. Is it to be accounted to them as a virtue or as a weakness? Their critic naturally thinks it rather a weakness; if they plunge into printer's ink, why not accept the consequences? But surely in the sympathetic breast there is something which pulsates in their defence. The instinct of retiracy is not wholly limited to women. Tennyson, whom Lord Lytton called Miss Alfred, in his day, says frankly of the poet generally, His worst he kept, his best he gave, and pleads earnestly that all of his life except what he puts in print may be recognized as his own. Hawthorne, Emerson, Whittier, and many others have claimed a similar shelter. Longfellow confessed to a dislike to seeing his name in print. Swift, while seeming defiant of the world, read family prayers in secret in his household-in a crypt, as Thackeray said — that t