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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., General Grant on the siege of Petersburg. (search)
attack until 8 o'clock, giving the Tenth Corps ample time to prepare to punish the enemy very severely. This he followed up by an attack on our intrenched infantry line, but was repulsed with severe slaughter. On the 13th a reconnoissanece was sent out by General Butler, with a view to drive the enemy from some new works he was constructing, which resulted in very heavy loss to us. General Kautz writes: On the 13th of October the Cavalry Division participated in a movement under General Terry, then in command of the Tenth Corps. We engaged the Confederate cavalry on the Charles City road, while the Tenth Corps troops attacked the enemy's intrenched line on the Darbytown road. On the 27th [of October] the Army of the Potomac, leaving only sufficient men to hold its fortified line, moved by the enemy's right flank. The Second Corps, followed by two divisions of the Fifth Corps, with the cavalry in advance and covering our left flank, forced a passage of Hatcher's Run, and
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Petersburg and Richmond: December 31st, 1864. (search)
ut. T. B. von Michalowski. Third Brigade, Col. Charles H. Smith: 1st Me., Lieut.-Col. Jonathan P. Cilley; 2d N. Y. Mounted Rifles, Capt. Samuel D. Stevenson; 6th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. George W. Dickinson; 21st Pa., Maj. Robert Bell. Unattached: 13th Ohio, Maj. Stephen R. Clark. Army of the James, Maj.-Gen. Benjamin F. Butler. Engineers: 1st N. Y., Col. Edward W. Serrell. Naval Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Charles K. Graham. twenty-Fourth Army Corps, Maj.-Gen. E. O. C. Ord (on leave), Brig.-Gen. Alfred H. Terry. Headquarters' Guard: 8th Conn., Col. John E. Ward. Provost Guard and Orderlies: F and K, 4th Mass. Cav. (detachments), Capt. Joseph J. Baker. first division, Brig.-Gen. Robert S. Foster. First Brigade, Col. Thomas O. Osborn: 39th Ill., Capt. Homer A. Plympton; 62d Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Henry R. West; 67th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Henry S. Commager; 199th Pa., Col. James C. Briscoe. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Joseph R. Hawley: 6th Conn., Col. Alfred P. Rockwell; 7th Conn., Capt. Hen
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Navy at Fort Fisher. (search)
e skirmish-line within Captain K. R. Breese. From a photograph. Major General A. H. Terry. From a photograph. fifty yards. Butler and Weitzel decided that itades under General Charles J. Paine, the whole under the command of Major-General Alfred H. Terry. While lying at Beaufort, Admiral Porter determined to assist in ttwo thousand officers and men offered themselves for this perilous duty. General Terry arrived off Beaufort [see map, p. 629] with his forces on the 8th of Januartroyed or dismounted. According to the report of General C. B. Comstock, General Terry's chief engineer, there were 21 guns and 3 mortars on the land front; of th to rally them. It was certainly mortifying, after charging for a mile, General Terry writes to the editors that he thinks that the head of the column of sailors by manning the intrenchments thrown up across the peninsula, which enabled General Terry to send Abbott's brigade and Blackman's (27th U. S.) colored regiment to th
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Fort Fisher, N. C.: January 13-15, 1865. (search)
The opposing forces at Fort Fisher, N. C.: January 13-15, 1865. The Union Army.--Major-General Alfred H. Terry. Second division, twenty-Fourth Army Corps, Brig.-Gen. Adelbert Ames. First Brigade, Col. N. Martin Curtis: 3d N. Y., Capt. James H. Reeve, Lieut. Edwin A. Behan; 112th N. Y., Col. John F. Smith; 117th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Francis X. Meyer; 142d N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Albert M. Barney. Second Brigade, Col. Galusha Pennypacker, Maj. Oliver P. Harding: 47th N. Y., Capt. Joseph M. McDos represented to have been about 500 killed and wounded. The garrison consisted of about 110 commissioned officers and 2400 or 2500 men. The strength thus stated probably included the 21st and 25th South Carolina sent from Hagood's Brigade. General Terry reported the capture of 112 officers and 1971 men. Colonel Lamb writes that all present in Fort Fisher, Jan. 13th-15th, including sick, killed, and wounded, numbered 1900. Naval force at Fort Fisher, Dec. 23-26, 1864, and Jan. 13-16, 186
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sherman's march from Savannah to Bentonville. (search)
purpose. Raising the Union flag over the old State-House, Columbia. From a sketch made at the time. Three or four days prior to our arrival at Fayetteville General Sherman had received information that Wilmington was in possession of General Terry, and had sent two messengers with letters informing Terry when he would probably be at Fayetteville. After Hood had been driven from Tennessee, Schofield was ordered to bring the Twenty-third Corps, General Cox, to Washington, whence it waTerry when he would probably be at Fayetteville. After Hood had been driven from Tennessee, Schofield was ordered to bring the Twenty-third Corps, General Cox, to Washington, whence it was sent to Fort Fisher, N. C. Schofield assumed command of the combined forces, and captured Wilmington, February 22d, 1865. Thence Cox was sent to New Berne; there he organized a provisional corps and moved via Kinston to Goldsboro‘, while the greater part of Schofield's forces advanced directly to that place.--editors. Contrabands in the wake of Sherman's Army. Both messengers arrived safely at Wilmington, and on Sunday, the day after our arrival at Fayetteville, the shrill whistle of
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the campaign of the Carolinas. (search)
ssigned April 1st), Capt. Samuel Kittinger; 10th Wis. (relieved for muster-out April 8th), Capt. Yates V. Beebe. CENTER Joined the main army at Goldsboro' March 21st. (Army of the Ohio), Maj.-Gen. John M. Schofield. Escort: G, 7th Ohio Cav., Capt. John A. Ashbury. Engineers: 15th N. Y. (3 cox's , Maj. Henry V. Slosson. Artillery, Lieut.-Col. Terance J. Kennedy (chief of artillery). Tenth Army Corps, As organized( April 2d; previously known as Provisional Corps. Maj.-Gen. Alfred H. Terry. first division The First Brigade at Morehead City and the Second Brigade at Wilmington. (late Second Division, Nineteenth Corps), Brig.-Gen. Henry W. Birge. Third Brigade, Col. Nicholas W. Day: 24th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. Edward Wright; 38th Mass., Lieut.-Col. James P. Richardson; 128th N. Y., Capt. Henry H. Sincerbos; 156th N. Y., Capt. Alfred Cooley; 175th N. Y. (5 co's), Capt. Chas. McCarthey; 176th N. Y., Maj. Chas. Lewis. Artillery: 22d Ind., Lieut. Geo. W. Alexander. Seco
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Five Forks and the pursuit of Lee. (search)
he morning; we have but a few hours of daylight left us. My cavalry are rapidly exhausting their ammunition, and if the attack is delayed much longer they may have none left. And then another batch of staff-officers were sent out to gallop through the mud and hurry up the columns. At 4 o'clock the formation was completed, the order for the assault was given, and the struggle for Pickett's intrenched line began. The Confederate infantry brigades were posted from right to left as follows: Terry, Corse, Steuart, Ransom, and Wallace. General Fitzhugh Lee, commanding the cavalry, had placed W. H. F. Lee's two brigades on the right of the line, Munford's division on the left, and Rosser's in rear of Hatcher's Run to guard the trains. I rode to the front in company with Sheridan and Warren, with the head of Ayres's division, which was on the left. When this division became engaged, Warren took up a more central position with reference to his corps. Ayres threw out a skirmish-line, a
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 7: military operations in Missouri, New Mexico, and Eastern Kentucky--capture of Fort Henry. (search)
forming McCook's vanguard, were thrown across the river, where they were attacked, Dec. 17. at Rowlett Station, by a regiment of mounted Texas Rangers, under Colonel Terry, supported by two regiments of infantry and a battery of six guns. The Nationals, though greatly outnumbered, and attacked chiefly by cavalry and artillery, repulsed the assailants with ball and bayonet, killing Terry and thirty-two others, wounding about fifty, and losing eight killed and ten wounded themselves. Report of General Buell to General McClellan, December 18, 1861. General Hindman, in his report on the 19th, said General Terry and three of his regiment were killed, three General Terry and three of his regiment were killed, three others slightly wounded, and only six missing. As they left a much larger number dead on the field, Hindman's report must have been incorrect. In this work they were aided by a battery on the north side of the river. Seeing re-enforcements crossing, the Confederates withdrew toward Bowling Green, slowly followed by the Nationals.
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 16: the Army of the Potomac before Richmond. (search)
at the close of May, 1866. After a delightful railway-journey of about two days from Greenville, in East Tennessee stopping one night at Lynchburg, we arrived at Richmond on the 26th. When the object of our journey was made known to Major-general Alfred H. Terry, then in command at Richmond, he kindly furnished us with every facility for an exploration of the battle-grounds in that vicinity. He placed his carriage and four horses at our disposal for several days; and we had competent guides as well as most genial companions in Colonels Martin, Graves, and Sullivan, of General Terry's Staff, who had participated in the stirring military events between Old Point Comfort and Richmond. Our first trip was made on a wet day, which gave us a realizing sense of that altogether abnormal state of the season of which the commander of the Army of the Potomac wrote, four years before, when waiting for fairer Mechanicsville. skies and drier earth to permit him to take. Richmond. We rode o
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 1: operations in Virginia.--battle of Chancellorsville.--siege of Suffolk. (search)
performed by both parties, To General Getty was intrusted the river line below Onondaga battery (see map on page 42), the key of the position, extending about eight miles in length. During the siege General Getty stormed and carried, with the Eighth Connecticut and Eighty-ninth New York, aided by Lieutenant Lamson and the gun-boats, a Confederate battery on the west branch of the Nansemond. He captured 6 guns and 200 prisoners. General Peck mentioned with commendation Generals Corcoran, Terry, Dodge, and Harland, and Colonels Dutton and Gibbs, commanding front lines; Colonels Gurney and Waddrop, commanding reserves; Colonels Spear and Onderdonk, of the cavalry. and Captain Follet. chief of artillery. The forts were in charge of the following officers: Fort Union, Colonel Drake; Nansernond, Colonel Hawkins; Halleck, Colonel Sullivan; Draw-bridge Battery, Colonel Davis; Battery Mansfield, Colonel Worth; the Redan and Battery Sosecrans, Colonel Thorpe; Battery Massachusetts, Capta
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