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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2,462 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 692 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 516 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 418 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Gallic War 358 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 298 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 230 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 190 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 186 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 182 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier). You can also browse the collection for France (France) or search for France (France) in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 4 document sections:

The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Personal Poems (search)
he builders' shame! 1841. To a friend, On her return from Europe. How smiled the land of France Under thy blue eye's glance, Light-hearted rover! Old walls of chateaux gray, Towers of an earlyat Rome's gates, and blood seemed vainly poured Where, in Christ's name, the crowned infidel Of France wrought murder with the arms of hell On that sad mountain slope whose ghostly dead, Unmindful of The Prussian bugle like the blast of doom, And every ill which follows unblest war Maddened all France from Finistere to Var, The weight of fourscore from his shoulders flung, And guided Freedom in td's dikes, assailed her liberties. Sadly, while yet in doubtful balance hung The weal and woe of France, the bells were rung For her lost leader. Paralyzed of will, Above his bier the hearts of men swound once more to rouse and warn, The old voice filled the air! His last brave word Not vainly France to all her boundaries stirred. Strong as in life, he still for Freedom wrought, As the dead Cid
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Occasional Poems (search)
nd one alive; Heard the martial thousand tread Battleward from Marblehead; Saw within the rock-walled bay Treville's lilied pennons play, And the fisher's dory met By the barge of Lafayette, Telling good news in advance Of the coming fleet of France! Church to reverend memories dear, Quaint in desk and chandelier; Bell, whose century-rusted tongue Burials tolled and bridals rung; Loft, whose tiny organ kept Keys that Snetzler's hand had swept; Altar, o'er whose tablet old Sinai's law itn freeing us, itself made free, Our Old World Sister, to us brings Her sculptured Dream of Liberty: Unlike the shapes on Egypt's sands Uplifted by the toil-worn slave, On Freedom's soil with freemen's hands We rear the symbol free hands gave. O France, the beautiful! to thee Once more a debt of love we owe: In peace beneath thy Colors Three, We hail a later Rochambeau! Rise, stately Symbol! holding forth Thy light and hope to all who sit In chains and darkness! Belt the earth With watch-fi
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Appendix (search)
other lands, the valleys of the Hun, Fair Parma with its orange bowers, and hills of vine and sun The lilies of imperial France drooped as the sound went by, The long lament of cloistered Spain was mingled with the cry. The dwellers in Colorno's halon the scene below, May half forget the dreams of home, That nightly with his slumbers come,— The tranquil skies of sunny France, The peasant's harvest song and dance, The vines around the hillsides wreathing, The soft airs midst their clusters breatr battle dress; And with them one whose bearded cheek, And white and wrinkled brow, bespeak A wanderer from the shores of France. A few long locks of scattering snow Beneath a battered morion flow. And from the rivets of the vest Which girds in steelmemory's fond essay, To bridge the mighty waste which lay Between his wild home and that gray, Tall chateau of his native France, Whose chapel bell, with far-heard din, Ushered his birth-hour gayly in, And counted with its solemn toll The masses for
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Index of first lines (search)
e again, IV. 348. Ho! thou who seekest late and long, III. 91. How bland and sweet the greeting of this breeze, IV. 35. How has New England's romance fled, i. 23. Ho! workers of the old time styled, III. 291. How smiled the land of France, IV. 23. How strange to greet, this frosty morn, II. 33. How sweetly come the holy psalms, IV. 100. How sweetly on the wood-girt town, i. 34. Hurrah! the seaward breezes, III. 294. Hushed now the sweet consoling tongue, IV. 409. 322. Is it the palm, the cocoa-palm, II. 52. I spread a scanty board too late, II. 178. Is this the land our fathers loved, III. 35. Is this thy voice whose treble notes of fear, III. 104. It chanced that while the pious troops of France, III. 343. It is done, III. 254. Its windows flashing to the sky, i. 217. It was late in mild October, and the long autumnal rain, III. 308. I wait and watch; before my eyes, II. 132. I wandered lonely where the pine-trees made, II