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Browsing named entities in Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation. You can also browse the collection for Ireland (Irish Republic) or search for Ireland (Irish Republic) in all documents.

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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, To the Queenes most excellent Majestie from the Lord Boris Pheodorovich Godonova. (search)
ry, and other regions, Lord and great Duke of Novogrod in the low countrey, of Chernigo, of Rezan, Polotsko, Rostove, Jeroslave, Bealozera, and of Lifland, of Udorsky, Obdorsky, Condinsky, and all the countrey of Sibery, and commander of all the North parts, and Lord over the countrey of Iversky, and King of Grusinsky, and of the countrey of Kabardinsky, Cherchasky, and duke of Igorsky, Lord and ruler of many countreys more, &c. Most resplendent Queene Elizabeth of England , France, and Ireland , &c. his princely Majesties servant, Lord and Master of his horses, and high Steward of his house, and President of the territories of Cazan and Astracan, Boris Pheodorovich Godonova, unto your most excellent Majesty, great Ladie Queene Elizabeth, send my humble commendations. It hath pleased your Majestie to write unto me your gracious and princely letter by your servant Thomas Lind: which letter I received with all humblenesse. During the time of the abode of your messenger Thomas Lind he
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A letter from the Lord Boris Pheodorowich to the right honourable Lord William Burghley, Lord high Treasurer of England. (search)
der of all the North parts, and Lord over the countrey of Iversky, and King of Grusinsky, and of the countreys of Kabardinsky, Cherchasky, and Duke of Igorsky, Lord and ruler of many Countreys more &c. His princely Majesties servant, Lord and Master of his horses, and high Steward of his house, President of the territories of Cazan and Astracan, Boris Pheodorowich Godonova, to the most honourable Counseller of the most resplendent mightie great Lady Elizabeth Queene of England , France, and Ireland , William Burghley, Lord, and Knight of the Garter, high Treasurour of England, sendeth greeting. I perceive by your letter that your merchants last shippes came home in saftie, and that you have received the letters sent by them, by the hands of Francis Cherie, one from our Lord and great King of all Russia his Majesty, unto your Queenes most excellent Majesty, and one from me to her Highnesse, and one from my selfe to you: and the contents thereof you have caused to be read and well u
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The miraculous victory atchieved by the English Fleete, under the discreet and happy conduct of the right honourable, right prudent, and valiant lord, the L. Charles Howard, L. high Admirall of England, &c. Upon the Spanish huge Armada sent in the yeere 1588. for the invasion of England, together with the wofull and miserable successe of the said Armada afterward, upon the coasts of Norway , of the Scottish Westerne Isles, of Ireland , of Spaine, of France, and of England, &c. Recorded in Latine by Emanuel van Meteran in the 15. booke of his history of the low Countreys. (search)
se of the said Armada afterward, upon the coasts of Norway , of the Scottish Westerne Isles, of Ireland , of Spaine, of France, and of England, &c. Recorded in Latine by Emanuel van Meteran in the 15.ood at length, so soone as the winde should serve them, to fetch a compasse about Scotland and Ireland , and so to returne for Spaine. For they well understood, that commandement was given thorowoeing about forty in number, and committed unto his Vice-admirall, fell neerer with the coast of Ireland , intending their course for Cape Clare, because they hoped there to get fresh water, and to refecond of September, they were cast by a tempest arising from the Southwest upon divers parts of Ireland , where many of their ships perished. And amongst others, the shippe of Michael de Oquendo, whic; and divers slaine by the barbarous and wilde Irish. Howbeit there was brought prisoner out of Ireland , Don Alonzo de Lucon, Colonell of two and thirtie bandes, commonly called a terza of Naples ; t
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The charter of the privileges granted to the English, & the league of the great Turke with the Queenes Majestie in respect of traffique, dated in June 1580. (search)
of the most choise and principall Europe, of Buda and Temeswar, and of the kingdomes beyond the Alpes , and many others such like, most mightie Murad Can, the sonne of the Emperour Zelim Can, which was the sonne of Zoleiman Can, which was the sonne of Zelim Can, which was the sonne of Paiizid Can, which was the sonne of Mehemed Can, &c. We most mightie prince Murad Can, in token of our Imperiall friendship, doe signifie and declare, that now of late Elizabeth Queene of England, France and Ireland , the most honourable Queene of Christendom (to whose marchants we wish happy successe) sent her letters by her worthy servant William Hareborne unto our stately and most magnificent Porch replenished with justice, which is a refuge and Sanctuary to all the princes of the world, by which letters her Majestie signified, that whereas heretofore certaine of her subjects had repaired to our saide stately Porche, and had shewed their obedience to the same, and for that cause had desired that leav
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Her Majesties letter to the Turke or Grand Signior 1581. promising redresse of the disorders of Peter Baker of Ratcliffe, committed in the Levant . (search)
Her Majesties letter to the Turke or Grand Signior 1581. promising redresse of the disorders of Peter Baker of Ratcliffe, committed in the Levant . ELIZABETH by the divine grace of the eternall God, of England, France and Ireland most sacred Queene, and of the most Christian faith, against all the prophaners of his most holy Name the zealous and mightie defendour, &c. To the most renowned and Emperious Caesar, Sultan Murad Can, Emperour of all the dominions of Turkie, and of all the East Monarchie chiefe above all others whosoever, most fortunate yeeres with the successe of al true happinesse. As with very great desire we wish and embrace tile love and amitie of forreine Princes, and in the same by al good dueties and meanes we seeke to be confirmed: so to us there may bee nothing more grievous and disliking, then that any thing should happen through the default of our Subjects, which any way might bring our faith and fidelitie into suspition: Although wee are not ignorant how man
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The letters patents, or privileges graunted by her Majestie to Sir Edward Osborne, Master Richard Staper, and certaine other Marchants of London for their trade into the dominions of the great Turke, in the yeere 1581. (search)
The letters patents, or privileges graunted by her Majestie to Sir Edward Osborne, Master Richard Staper, and certaine other Marchants of London for their trade into the dominions of the great Turke, in the yeere 1581. ELIZABETH by the grace of God Queene of England, France and Ireland , defender of the faith, &c. To all our Officers, ministers, and Subjects, and to all other people as well within this our Realme of England, as else where under our obeysance, jurisdiction, or otherwise, unto whom these our letters shall be seene, shewed or read, greeting. Where our welbeloved Subjects Edward Osborne Alderman of our Citie of London, and Richard Staper of our sayde City Marchant, have by great adventure and industrie, with their great costes and charges, by the space. of sundry late yeeres, travailed, and caused travaile to bee taken, as well by secret and good meanes, as by dangerous wayes and passages both by lande and Sea, to finde out and set open a trade of Marchandize and traf
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The Queenes Commission under her great seale, to her servant master William Hareborne, to be her majesties Ambassadour or Agent, in the partes of Turkie. 1582. (search)
The Queenes Commission under her great seale, to her servant master William Hareborne, to be her majesties Ambassadour or Agent, in the partes of Turkie. 1582. ELIZABETH, by the clemencie of the most good and most great God, the only creator and governour of all things, Queene of England, France, and Ireland , invincible, and most mightie defender of the true faith, against all Idolaters falsly professing the name of Christ, to all and singuler persons, to whose sight and view these our present letters may come, greeting. Whereas the most renowmed, and most invincible Prince Zuldan Murad Can, the most mighty governour of the kingdom of Turkie, and Monarch of the East Empire, hath entered into league and friendship with us, (which we for our part, as much as lieth in us, doe purpose solemnly, and inviolablie to keepe in all times to come) and whereas for the better countenancing and authorizing of the same, the foresayd renowmed Emperour hath graunted unto our subjects free libertie
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The privilege of Peter the Prince of Moldavia graunted to the English Marchants. (search)
The privilege of Peter the Prince of Moldavia graunted to the English Marchants. PETER by the grace of God prince of Valachia and Moldavia ; we signifie by these presents to all and singuler persons, whom it doth or shall concerne, that we have made this agreement with the worthy gentleman William Hareborne Ambassador of the right high and mighty prince, the Lady Elizabeth by the grace of God Queene of England, France and Ireland , with the most puissant and mightie Emperour of the Turkes : To witte, that from hencefoorth it shalbe lawfull for her highnesse subjects and all her Marchants, to remaine, converse, buy, sel, bargaine and exercise all such things, as the trade of marchandise, and humane societie and use requireth, without any hinderance or let: the right of our Custome alwayes reserved; That is, that they pay three ducats upon all such things as amount to the price of one hundred ducats. Which by this our ordinance we command to be surely and firmely observed; For the more a
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The first voyage made by Master William Towrson Marchant of London, to the coast of Guinea, with two Ships, in the yeere 1555. (search)
und our selves to be in 22 degrees. This day one of our men called William King, who had bene long sicke, died in his sleepe, his apparell was distributed to those that lackt it, and his money was kept for his friends to be delivered them at his comming home. The 30 day we found our selves to be under the Tropike. The 31 day we went our course, and made way 18 leagues. From the first day of Aprill to the 20 we went our course, and then found our selves to bee in the height of the Asores. The seventh day of May we fell with the South part of Ireland , and going on shoare with our boate had fresh drinke, and two sheepe of the countrey people, which were wilde Kernes, and we gave them golde for them, and bought further such other victuals as we had neede of, and thought would serve us till we arrived in England. The 14 day with the afternoone tide we went into the Port of Bristoll called Hungrode, and there ankered in safetie and gave thankes to God for our safe arrivall.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A letter of M. John Lok to the worshipfull company of Marchants adventurers for Guinie, written 1561, shewing reasons for his not proceeding in a voyage then intended to the foresayd countrey. (search)
ravell, to my great charges and paine, and after, for not falling out accordingly, to lose both pot and water, as the proverbe is. As for the Primrose, if she be there, her trade will be ended or ever we come there, so that she of force, by want of provision, must returne : yea, though we should carry with us a supply for her, yet is the meeting of her doubtfull, and though we met her, yet will the men not tarry, as no reason is they should: howbeit my opinion of her is that she is put into Ireland . The Flowerdeluce was in Mil ford. Thus for that your worships might understand the whole cause why I doe not proceed, I have troubled you at this time with this my long Letter. And, as God is my Judge, not for feare of the Portugals, which there we shall meet (and yet alone without ayde) as here is a shippe which was in Lisbon , whose men say that there are in a readinesse (onely to meet us) foure great ships, of the which one is accounted 700 tunnes, & other pinnesses: yet not for feare
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