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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The large pension granted by K. Edward the 6. to Sebastian Cabota, constituting him grand Pilot of England. (search)
The large pension granted by K. Edward the 6. to Sebastian Cabota, constituting him grand Pilot of England. EDWARD the sixt by the grace of God, King of England, France and Ireland , defender of the faith, to all Christian people to whom these presents shall come, sendeth greeting. Know yee that we, in consideration of the good and acceptable service done, and to be done, unto us by our beloved servant Sebastian Cabota, of our speciall grace, certaine knowledge, meere motion, and by the advice and counsel of our most honourable uncle Edward duke of Somerset governour of our person, and Protector of our kingdomes, dominions, and subjects, and of the rest of our Counsaile, have given & granted, and by these presents do give and graunt to the said Sebastian Cabota, a certaine annuitie, or yerely revenue of one hundreth, threescore & sixe pounds, thirteene shillings foure pence sterling, to have, enjoy, and yerely receive the foresaid annuitie, or yerely revenue, to the foresaid Seba
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A discourse written by Sir Humphrey Gilbert Knight, to prove a passage by the Northwest to Cathaia, and the East Indies. (search)
n some other part of Europe before their arrivall there, as the Isles of the Acores, Portugal , Spaine, France, England, Ireland , &c. which if they had done, it is not credible that they should or would have departed undiscovered of the inhabitants:h parts of America . 4 And if by the fret of Magellan, then upon the coasts of Afrike, Spaine, Portugall, France, Ireland or England. 5 And if by the Northeast, then upon the coasts of Ceremissi, Tartarii, Lappia, Island, Terra de Labrado. 9 Also there was one Salvaterra, a Gentleman of Victoria in Spaine, that came by chance out of the West Indias into Ireland , Anno 1568. who affirmed the Northwest passage from us to Cataia, constantly to be beleeved in America navigable. And fland) in my hearing, that a Frier of Mexico, called Andrew Urdaneta, more then eight yeeres before his then comming into Ireland , told him there, that he came from Mar del Sur into Germany through this Northwest passage, & shewed Salvaterra (at tha
place (once leaving the coast of Afrikeļ¼‰ untill they came to America , nor from America untill they arrived upon some part of Europe, or the Islands adjoyning to it, to have refreshed themselves. 4 Also, if (notwithstanding such impossibilities) they might have recovered Germanie by comming from India by the Southeast, yet must they without all doubt have striken upon some other part of Europe before their arrivall there, as the Isles of the Acores, Portugal , Spaine, France, England, Ireland , &c. which if they had done, it is not credible that they should or would have departed undiscovered of the inhabitants: but there was never found in those dayes any such ship or men but only upon the coasts of Germanie, where they have bene sundry times and in sundry ages cast aland: neither is it like that they would have committed themselves againe to sea, if they had so arrived, not knowing where they were, nor whither to have gone. 5 And by the Southwest it is unpossible, because th
(as aforesaid) have fallen upon the South parts of America . 4 And if by the fret of Magellan, then upon the coasts of Afrike, Spaine, Portugall, France, Ireland or England. 5 And if by the Northeast, then upon the coasts of Ceremissi, Tartarii, Lappia, Island, Terra de Labrador, &c. and upon these coasts (as aforesaie entred and passed a great part thereof. 9 Also there was one Salvaterra, a Gentleman of Victoria in Spaine, that came by chance out of the West Indias into Ireland , Anno 1568. who affirmed the Northwest passage from us to Cataia, constantly to be beleeved in America navigable. And further said in the presence of sir Henry Sidney (then lord Deputie of Ireland) in my hearing, that a Frier of Mexico, called Andrew Urdaneta, more then eight yeeres before his then comming into Ireland , told him there, that he came from Mar del Sur into Germany through this Northwest passage, & shewed Salvaterra (at that time being then with him in Mexico) a Sea Card m
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The third and last voyage unto Meta Incognita, made by M. Martin Frobisher, in the yeere 1578. Written by Thomas Ellis. (search)
and duety, and were welcommed with the like courtesie: which being finished we landed: where our Generall continued mustering his souldiers and Miners, and setting things in order appertaining to the voyage untill the last of the said moneth of May, which day we hoised our sailes, and committing our selves to the conducting of Almightie God, we set forward toward the west Countrey in such luckie wise and good successe, that by the fift of June we passed the Dursies, being the utmost part of Ireland to the Westward. And here it were not much amisse nor farre from our purpose, if I should a little discourse and speake of our adventures and chances by the way, as our landing at Plimmouth, as also the meeting certaine poore men, which were robbed and spoyled of all that they had by Pirates and Rovers: amongst whom was a man of Bristow, on whom our Generall used his liberality, and sent him away with letters into England . But because such things are impertinent to the matter, I w
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The report of Thomas Wiars passenger in the Emanuel, otherwise called the Busse of Bridgewater, wherein James Leech was Master, one of the ships in the last Voyage of Master Martin Frobisher 1578. concerning the discoverie of a great Island in their way homeward the 12. of September. (search)
ynt of Frisland was from him at that instant when hee first descryed this new Islande, Northwest by North, 50. leagues. They account this Island to be 25. leagues long, and the longest way of it Southeast, and Northwest. The Southerne part of it is in the latitude of 57. degrees and 1. second part, or there about. They continued in sight of it, from the 12. day at a 11 . of the clocke, till the 13. day three of the clocke in the after noone, when they left it: and the last part they saw of it, bare from them Northwest by North. There appeared two Harboroughs upon that coast: the greatest of them seven leagues to the Northwards of the Southermost poynt, the other but foure leagues. There was very much yce neere the same land, and also twentie or thirty leagues from it, for they were not cleare of yce, till the 15. day of September after noone. They plyed their Voyage homewards, and fell with the West part of Ireland about Galway , and had first sight of it on the 25. day of September.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A true discourse of the three Voyages of discoverie, for the finding of a passage to Cathaya, by the Northwest, under the conduct of Martin Frobisher Generall: Before which, as a necessary Preface is prefixed a twofolde discourse, conteining certaine reasons to prove all partes of the World habitable. Penned by Master George Best, a Gentleman employed in the same voyages. (search)
ption set out by two brethren Venetians, Nicholaus and Antonius Zeni, who being driven off from Ireland with a violent tempest made shipwracke here, and were the first knowen Christians that discoverof May. And sayling along the South part of England Westward, we at length came by the coast of Ireland at Cape Cleare the sixth of June, and gave chase there to a small barke which was supposed tomany of the fleete were not throughly furnished: and sayling towards the Northwest parts from Ireland , we mette with a great current from out of the Southwest, which caried us (by our reckoning) on and are made by the reverberation and reflection of that same current, which at our comming by Ireland , met and crossed us, of which in the first part of this discourse I spake, which comming from the bay of Mexico, passing by and washing the Southwest parts of Ireland , reboundeth over to the Northeast parts of the world, as Norway , Island, &c. where not finding any passage to an open Sea, but
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A true report of such things as happened in the second voyage of captaine Frobisher, pretended for the discovery of a new passage to Cataya, China and the East India, by the Northwest. Ann. Dom. 1577. (search)
nde, having the mountaines almost covered over with snow alongst the coast full of drift yce, and seemeth almost inaccessible, and is thought to be an Iland in bignesse not inferiour to England , and is called of some Authors, West Frislande, I thinke because it lyeth more West then any part of Europe . It extendeth in latitude to the Northward very farre as seemed to us, and appeareth by a description set out by two brethren Venetians, Nicholaus and Antonius Zeni, who being driven off from Ireland with a violent tempest made shipwracke here, and were the first knowen Christians that discovered this land about two hundred yeares sithence, and they have in their Sea-cardes set out every part thereof and described the condition of the inhabitants, declaring them to be as civill and religious people as we. And for so much of this land as we have sayled alongst, comparing their Carde with the coast, we finde it very agreeable. This coast seemeth to have good fishing, for we lying becalmed
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The third voyage of Captaine Frobisher, pretended for the discoverie of Cataia, by Meta Incognita, Anno Do. 1578. (search)
h the one and thirtieth of May. And sayling along the South part of England Westward, we at length came by the coast of Ireland at Cape Cleare the sixth of June, and gave chase there to a small barke which was supposed to be a Pyrat, or Rover on other provision, whereof many of the fleete were not throughly furnished: and sayling towards the Northwest parts from Ireland , we mette with a great current from out of the Southwest, which caried us (by our reckoning) one point to the Northeastw great indrafts doe growe and are made by the reverberation and reflection of that same current, which at our comming by Ireland , met and crossed us, of which in the first part of this discourse I spake, which comming from the bay of Mexico, passing by and washing the Southwest parts of Ireland , reboundeth over to the Northeast parts of the world, as Norway , Island, &c. where not finding any passage to an open Sea, but rather being there encreased by a new accesse, and another current meeting
h the one and thirtieth of May. And sayling along the South part of England Westward, we at length came by the coast of Ireland at Cape Cleare the sixth of June, and gave chase there to a small barke which was supposed to be a Pyrat, or Rover on other provision, whereof many of the fleete were not throughly furnished: and sayling towards the Northwest parts from Ireland , we mette with a great current from out of the Southwest, which caried us (by our reckoning) one point to the Northeastw great indrafts doe growe and are made by the reverberation and reflection of that same current, which at our comming by Ireland , met and crossed us, of which in the first part of this discourse I spake, which comming from the bay of Mexico, passing by and washing the Southwest parts of Ireland , reboundeth over to the Northeast parts of the world, as Norway , Island, &c. where not finding any passage to an open Sea, but rather being there encreased by a new accesse, and another current meeting
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