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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The Voyages and Navigations of the English nation to Virginia , and the severall discoveries therof chiefly at the charges of the honourable Sir Walter Ralegh knight, from 33 to 40 degrees of latitude: together with the successe of the English colonies there planted: as likewise a description of the Countrey, with the Inhabitants, and the manifold commodities. Whereunto are annexed the patents, letters, discourses, &c. to this part belonging. (search)
of such Countryes, landes, and territories so to be possessed and inhabited as aforesayd with our Realmes of England and Ireland , and the better incouragement of men to these enterprises: we doe by these presents, graunt and declare that all such Atturneis, Deputies, Officers, Ministers, Factors, and servants, to imbarke & transport out of our Realme of England and Ireland , and the Dominions thereof, all or any of his or their goods, and all or any the goods of his and their associats and cohe pinnesse sent off their boate to us with 6 or 8 men, of whom we understood wee were in Smerwick in the West parts of Ireland : they also releeved us presently with fresh water, wine, and other fresh meate. The 18 the Governour and the Master Monkie, which at that time was ready to put to sea from Dingen for England , leaving the Flyboat and all his companie in Ireland . The same day we set sayle, and on the third day we fell with the North side of the lands end, and were shut up the Seve
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The letters patents, granted by the Queenes Majestie to M. Walter Ralegh, now Knight, for the discovering and planting of new lands and Countries, to continue the space of 6. yeeres and no more. (search)
sayd Walter Ralegh, his heires, and assignes, and every, or any of them. And for uniting in more perfect league and amitie, of such Countryes, landes, and territories so to be possessed and inhabited as aforesayd with our Realmes of England and Ireland , and the better incouragement of men to these enterprises: we doe by these presents, graunt and declare that all such Countries, so hereafter to be possessed and inhabited as is aforesayd, from thencefoorth shall be of the allegiance to us, our Ralegh, his heires and assignes, and every or any of them by him, & by themselves, or by their, or any of their sufficient Atturneis, Deputies, Officers, Ministers, Factors, and servants, to imbarke & transport out of our Realme of England and Ireland , and the Dominions thereof, all or any of his or their goods, and all or any the goods of his and their associats and companies, and every or any of them, with such other necessaries and commodities of any our Realmes, as to the sayde Lorde Trea
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The fourth voyage made to Virginia with three ships, in the yere 1587. Wherein was transported the second Colonie. (search)
d a pinnesse of Hampton riding, but we knew not as yet what place this was, neither had we any boate to goe ashore, untill the pinnesse sent off their boate to us with 6 or 8 men, of whom we understood wee were in Smerwick in the West parts of Ireland : they also releeved us presently with fresh water, wine, and other fresh meate. The 18 the Governour and the Master ryd to Dingen a Cushe, 5 miles distant, to take order for the new victualing of our Flieboate for England , and for reliefe ht sicke to Dingen. November.THE first the Governour shipped himselfe in a ship called the Monkie, which at that time was ready to put to sea from Dingen for England , leaving the Flyboat and all his companie in Ireland . The same day we set sayle, and on the third day we fell with the North side of the lands end, and were shut up the Severne, but the next day we doubled the same for Mounts Bay. The 5 the Governour landed in England at Martasew, neere Saint
October.THE 16 of October we made land, but we knewe not what land it was, bearing in with the same land at that day: about sunne set we put into a harbour, where we found a Hulke of Dublin, and a pinnesse of Hampton riding, but we knew not as yet what place this was, neither had we any boate to goe ashore, untill the pinnesse sent off their boate to us with 6 or 8 men, of whom we understood wee were in Smerwick in the West parts of Ireland : they also releeved us presently with fresh water, wine, and other fresh meate. The 18 the Governour and the Master ryd to Dingen a Cushe, 5 miles distant, to take order for the new victualing of our Flieboate for England , and for reliefe of our sicke and hurt men, but within foure daies after the Boatswain, the Steward, and the Boatswains mate died aboord the Flieboat, and the 28 the Masters mate and two of our chiefe sailers were brought sicke to Dingen.
November.THE first the Governour shipped himselfe in a ship called the Monkie, which at that time was ready to put to sea from Dingen for England , leaving the Flyboat and all his companie in Ireland . The same day we set sayle, and on the third day we fell with the North side of the lands end, and were shut up the Severne, but the next day we doubled the same for Mounts Bay. The 5 the Governour landed in England at Martasew, neere Saint Michaels mount in Cornewall. The 8 we arrived at Hampton , where we understood that our consort the Admiral was come to Portsmouth , and had bene there three weekes before: and also that Ferdinando the Master with all his company were not onely come home without any purchase, but also in such weaknesse by sicknesse, and death of their chiefest men, that they were scarse able to bring their ship into harbour, but were forced to let fall anker without, which they could not wey againe, but might all have perished t
lth wherein you live. Hereof we have examples domesticall and forreine. Remember I pray you, what you find in the beginning of the Chronicle of the conquest of Ireland newly dedicated unto your selfe. Read you not that Richard Strangbow the decayed earle of Chepstow in Monmuthshire, being in no great favour of his soveraigne, a , and the large extension therof, especially to the West, should make you thinke that the subduing of it, were a matter of more difficulty then the conquest of Ireland , first I answere, that as the late experience of that skilfull pilote and Captaine M. John Davis to the Northwest (toward which his discovery your selfe have throver it is not to be denied, but that one hundred men will do more now among the naked and unarmed people in Virginia , then one thousand were able then to do in Ireland against that armed and warlike nation in those dales. I say further, that these two yeres last experience hath plainly shewed, that we may spare 10000. able men
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, An Epistle Dedicatorie to sir Walter Ralegh, prefixed by master Richard Hakluyt before the history of Florida , which he translated out of French 1587 (search)
lth wherein you live. Hereof we have examples domesticall and forreine. Remember I pray you, what you find in the beginning of the Chronicle of the conquest of Ireland newly dedicated unto your selfe. Read you not that Richard Strangbow the decayed earle of Chepstow in Monmuthshire, being in no great favour of his soveraigne, a , and the large extension therof, especially to the West, should make you thinke that the subduing of it, were a matter of more difficulty then the conquest of Ireland , first I answere, that as the late experience of that skilfull pilote and Captaine M. John Davis to the Northwest (toward which his discovery your selfe have throver it is not to be denied, but that one hundred men will do more now among the naked and unarmed people in Virginia , then one thousand were able then to do in Ireland against that armed and warlike nation in those dales. I say further, that these two yeres last experience hath plainly shewed, that we may spare 10000. able men
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The discoverie of the large, rich, and beautifull Empire of Guiana, with a relation of the great and golden citie of Manoa (which the Spaniards call El Dorado) and the provinces of Emeria, Aromaia, Amapaia, and other countries, with their rivers adjoyning. Performed in the yeere 1595 by Sir Walter Ralegh Knight, Captaine of Her Majesties Guard, Lorde Warden of the Stanneries, and Her Highnesse Lieutenant Generall of the Countie of Corne-wall. (search)
e trades of sacks, and Sivil oringes, nor from ought els that either Spaine, Portugal , or any of his other provinces produce: it is his Indian gold that indangereth and disturbeth all the nations of Europe , it purchaseth intelligence, creepeth into counsels, and setteth bound loyaltie at libertie, in the greatest Monarchies of Europe. If the Spanish king can keepe us from forren enterprizes, & from the impeachment of his trades, either by offer of invasion, or by besieging us in Britaine, Ireland , or elsewhere, hee hath then brought the worke of our peril in great forwardnes. Those princes which abound in treasure have great advantages over the rest, if they once constraine them to a defensive war, where they are driven once a yere or oftener to cast lots for their own garments, and from such shal all trades, & entercourse be taken away, to the general losse and impoverishment of the kingdom and common weale so reduced: besides when our men are constrained to fight, it hath not the
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The Epistle of sir Walter Ralegh to the reader (search)
e trades of sacks, and Sivil oringes, nor from ought els that either Spaine, Portugal , or any of his other provinces produce: it is his Indian gold that indangereth and disturbeth all the nations of Europe , it purchaseth intelligence, creepeth into counsels, and setteth bound loyaltie at libertie, in the greatest Monarchies of Europe. If the Spanish king can keepe us from forren enterprizes, & from the impeachment of his trades, either by offer of invasion, or by besieging us in Britaine, Ireland , or elsewhere, hee hath then brought the worke of our peril in great forwardnes. Those princes which abound in treasure have great advantages over the rest, if they once constraine them to a defensive war, where they are driven once a yere or oftener to cast lots for their own garments, and from such shal all trades, & entercourse be taken away, to the general losse and impoverishment of the kingdom and common weale so reduced: besides when our men are constrained to fight, it hath not the
. hulkes laden in Lisbone with Spaniards goods, and because their lading was very rich, they were determined to go about Ireland , and so they let her goe againe like a goose with a broken wing. The next day after being the 21. day, wee espied 5. our sick men. Thus as lost wanderers upon the sea, the 11 of June 1593, it pleased God that we arrived at Bear-haven in Ireland , and there ran the ship on shore: where the Irish men helped us to take in our sailes, and to more our ship for flootingore he could have the ship in safetie. Thus without victuals, sailes, men, or any furniture God onely guided us into Ireland , where the captaine left the master and three or foure of the company to keepe the ship; and within 5 dayes after he and Portugales of Macao, or the Spaniards of the Philippinas. ELIZABETH by the grace of God Queene of England , France, and Ireland , the most mightie defendresse of the true & christian faith against all that falsely professe the name of Christ &c. To
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