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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 60 2 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 54 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 24 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 14 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 12 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. 12 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 10 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 7. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 30, 1862., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 14, 1862., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Liberia (Liberia) or search for Liberia (Liberia) in all documents.

Your search returned 31 results in 17 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ashmun, Jehudi, 1794- (search)
Ashmun, Jehudi, 1794- Missionary; born in Champlain, N. Y., in April, 1794; was graduated at Bowdoin College in 1816, and prepared for the ministry. He was sent with a reinforcement to the colony of Liberia in 1822, where he acted as legislator, soldier, and engineer in constructing fortifications. He had a force of only thirty-five men and boys, with which he repulsed an attack of 800 natives. His wife died, and he, weakened by fevers, was compelled by broken health, to sail for home. ith a reinforcement to the colony of Liberia in 1822, where he acted as legislator, soldier, and engineer in constructing fortifications. He had a force of only thirty-five men and boys, with which he repulsed an attack of 800 natives. His wife died, and he, weakened by fevers, was compelled by broken health, to sail for home. A fortnight after his arrival in Boston, Mass., he died, Aug. 25, 1828. He had made the settlement in Liberia orderly and permanent during the six years he was there.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Centennial Exhibition, (search)
ional government issued invitations to all foreign nations having diplomatic relations with the United States to participate in the exhibition by sending the products of their industries. There was a generous response, and thirty-three nations, besides the United States, were represented—namely, Argentine Republic, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chili, China, Denmark, Egypt, France, Germany, Great Britain and Ireland, India and British colonies, Hawaiian Islands, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Liberia. Luxemburg Grand Duchy, Mexico, Netherlands, Norway, Orange Free State, Peru, Portugal, Russia, Santo Domingo, Spain and Spanish colonies, Siam, Sweden, Switzerland, Tunis, Turkey, and Venezuela. A Woman's executive committee was formed, composed of Philadelphians, who raised money sufficient among the women of the Union for the erection of a building for the exhibition exclusively of women's work—sculpture, painting, engraving, lithography, literature, telegraphy, needlework of all kinds
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Colonization Society, American (search)
ent of the colony was assumed by the society. A constitution for the colony (which was named Liberia) was adopted (Jan. 24, 1820), by which all the powers of the government were vested in the agent of the colonization society. In 1824 a plan for a civil government in Liberia was adopted, by which the society retained the privilege of ultimate decision. Another constitution was adopted in 18gation law with impunity, and, when the British government was appealed to, the answer was that Liberia had no national existence. In this emergency the society surrendered such governmental power ad such a declaration of independence was made July 26, 1847. The next year the independence of Liberia was acknowledged by the United States, Great Britain, and France. So the American Colonization Society became mainly instrumental in the foundation of Liberia, and in sustaining the colony until it became self-supporting. After that consummation the society continued to send out emigrants,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Diplomatic service. (search)
aordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Athens. Guatemala and Honduras. W. Godfrey Hunter, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Guatemala City. Haiti. William F. Powell, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Port au Prince. Italy. ————, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, Rome. Japan. Alfred E. Buck, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Tokio. Korea. Horace N. Allen, Minister Resident and Consul-General, Seoul. Liberia. Owen L. W. Smith, Minister Resident and Consul-General, Monrovia. Mexico. Powell Clayton, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, Mexico. Netherlands. Stanford Newel, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, The Hague. Nicaragua and Salvador. William L. Merry, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, San Jose. (See Costa Rica.) Paraguay and Uruguay. William R. Finch, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Montevideo. Persi
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dornin, Thomas Aloysius, 1800-1874 (search)
Dornin, Thomas Aloysius, 1800-1874 Naval officer; born in Ireland about 1800; entered the United States navy in 1815; prevented William Walker's expedition from invading Mexico in 1851; later sailed to Mazatlan and secured the release of forty Americans there held as prisoners; afterwards captured two slavers with more than 1,400 slaves, and took them to Liberia; was promoted commodore and retired during the Civil War. He died in Norfolk, Va., April 22, 1874.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Latrobe, John Hazlehurst Boneval 1803-1891 (search)
to the bar in 1825 and practised for more than sixty years. He became identified with the American Colonization Society in 1824, and was deeply interested in the work of that body for many years. With General Harper he drew up the first map of Liberia, and was largely instrumental in securing the establishment of the Maryland colony in that country. He is also known through the invention of the famous Baltimore heater, which came into general use in the United States. His publications incstablishment of the Maryland colony in that country. He is also known through the invention of the famous Baltimore heater, which came into general use in the United States. His publications include The Capitol and Washington at the beginning of the present century (an address); Scott's Infantry and rifle tactics; Picture of Baltimore; History of Mason and Dixon's line; History of Maryland in Liberia; Reminiscences of West Point in 1818 to 1822, etc. He died in Baltimore, Md., Sept. 11, 1891.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Liberia, (search)
atly improved by drainage, and the fatal African fever is now less frequent in Liberia than anywhere on the adjoining coasts. All tropical fruits and vegetables grorly all killed or driven into the wild surrounding country. The government of Liberia is modelled on that of the United States, and consists of a president, electedcitizens can hold real estate, and only negroes can be citizens. The state of Liberia is divided into four counties, and these again into townships. There are a nuis Monrovia, the capital, a city of about 13,000 inhabitants. The republic of Liberia owes its origin to the American Colonization Society, which was organized abou interest has been paid on the public debt since 1874. It cannot be said that Liberia has been a success, socially or politically. The negroes in the United States A number of missions have been carried on among the aboriginal inhabitants of Liberia for many years. The American Methodist Episcopal mission dates from 1833, the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Lincoln, Abraham 1809- (search)
no more responsible for the origin of slavery than we are, I acknowledge the fact. When it is said that the institution exists, and that it is very difficult to get rid of it in any satisfactory way, I can understand and appreciate the saying. I surely will not blame them for not doing what I should not know how to do myself. If all earthly power were given me, I should not know what to do as to the existing institution. My first impulse would be to free all the slaves, and send them to Liberia—to their own native land. But a moment's reflection would convince me that, whatever of high hope (as I think there is) there may be in this in the long run, its sudden execution is impossible. If they were all landed there in a day, they would all perish in the next ten days; and there are not surplus shipping and surplus money enough in the world to carry them there in many times ten days. What then? Free them all, and keep them among us as underlings? Is it quite certain that this be
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Perry, Matthew Calbraith 1794-1858 (search)
Perry, Matthew Calbraith 1794-1858 Naval officer; born in Newport, R. I., April 10, 1794; was a brother of Commodore Oliver 11. Perry, and entered the navy as midshipman in 1809. In command of the Cyane, in 1819, he fixed the locality of the settlement of Liberia. He captured several pirate vessels in the West Indies from 1821 to 1824, and was employed on shore from 1833 to 1841, when he again, as commodore, went to sea in command of squadrons for several years, engaging in the siege of Vera Cruz in 1847. From 1852 to 1854 he commanded the expedition to Japan, and negotiated a very important treaty with the rulers of that empire, which has led to wonderful results in the social and religious condition of that people, and secured great advantages to America. A monument commemorating Commodore Perry's visit to Japan was erected at Kurihama, Japan, in 1901. In a circular sent out by the American Association of Japan, of which the Japanese Minister of Justice is president, th
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Somers, the (search)
Somers, the An American brig-of-war of 266 tons' burden, and fitted to carry fourteen guns, but carrying ten, with a crew of officers, men, and boys of 120, under command of Alexander Slidell Mackenzie, cruising along the coast of Africa, left Liberia on Nov. 11, 1842, for the United States, via St. Thomas. On Nov. 25 Mackenzie received information through Lieutenant Gansevoort of a conspiracy on board to seize the brig and convert her into a pirate, etc. The leaders in this movement were reported to be Midshipman Philip Spencer, son of John C. Spencer, then Secretary of War, and Samuel Cromwell, the boatswain's mate, and a seaman, Elisha Small. Spencer was arrested on Nov. 27, and the other two on the 28th, and put in irons. These three were convicted by a court on board, and sentenced to be hanged at the yard-arm, the sentence being carried into effect on Dec. 1, 525 miles from St. Thomas. the Somers arrived at New York, Dec. 14, with several of the boys in confinement. A
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