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d two horses for sale at auction; and, at the time of the sale, stood in front of the auctioneer's stand, notifying all bidders that the title might be considered defective, since he had taken the horses with the slaves whom he liberated in Western Missouri, finding it necessary to his success that the slaves should have horses, and that the masters should not. But, he added, when telling the story afterward, they brought a very excellent price. Early in April following, he was in Ashtabula County, Ohio, sick of the ague. He visited his family in Essex County, New York, toward the end of that month. In May, he was in New York City, Rochester, and Boston, where he learned to manufacture crackers. On the 3d of June, he was at Collinsville, Conn., where he closed a contract for a thousand pikes, that he had ordered some time before. He was soon afterward again in Northern Ohio, and in Western Pennsylvania, proceeding by Pittsburg and Bedford to Chambersburg, where he remained sev
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Garfield, James Abram 1831-1881 (search)
the Connecticut Company. Geauga was the second county of the Reserve. It was created by an act of the legislature, Dec. 31, 1805; and by a subsequent act its boundaries were made to include the present territory of Cuyahoga county as far west as the Fourteenth Range. Portage county was established on Feb. 10, 1807; and on June 16, 1810, the act establishing Cuyahoga county went into operation. But that act all of Geauga west of the Ninth Range was made a part of Cuyahoga county. Ashtabula county was established on Jan. 22, 1811. A considerable number of Indians remained on the Western Reserve until the breaking out of the War of 1812. Most of the Canadian tribes took up arms against the United States in that struggle, and a portion of the Indians of the Western Reserve joined their Canadian brethren. At the close of that war occasional bands of these Indians returned to their old haunts on the Cuyahoga and the Mahoning; but the inhabitants of the Reserve soon made them und
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Peet, Stephen Denison 1830- (search)
Peet, Stephen Denison 1830- Clergyman; born in Euclid, O., Dec. 2, 1830; graduated at Beloit College in 1851 and at Andover Theological Seminary in 1854; was active in the ministry of the Congregational Church in 1855-66; later became known as an archaeologist. In 1878 he founded and became editor of The American Antiquarian, the first journal in the United States devoted entirely to archaeology. His publications include History of Ashtabula county, Ohio; Ancient architecture in America; History of early missions in Wisconsin; Primitive symbolism; Mound builders; Animal effigies; Cliff dwellers; The effigy mounds of Wisconsin, etc.
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Book 1: he keepeth the sheep. (search)
e soul were drawn with the unvarying fidelity of Nature. The family record. John Brown was married to his first wife, Dianthe Lusk, June 21, 1820, at Hudson, in Ohio. In order to make no interruptions in the narrative, or confusion of dates, I subjoin here the family record as it stood at John Brown's death. By his first wife, John Brown had seven children: John Brown, junior, July 25, 1821, at Hudson, Ohio; married Wealthy C. Hotchkiss, July, 1847. He now lives in Ashtabula County, Ohio; now fully recovered from his once dangerous malady. Jason Brown, January 19, 1823, Hudson, Ohio; married Ellen Sherboudy, July, 1847. Owen Brown, November 4, 1824, Hudson, Ohio; he escaped from Harper's Ferry. Frederick Brown, (1st,) January 9, 1827, Richmond, Pennsylvania; died March 31, 1831. Ruth Brown, February 18, 1829, Richmond, Pennsylvania; married Henry Thompson, September 26, 1850. Friederick Brown, (2d,) December 21, 1830, Richmond, Pennsylvania; murdered at Os
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 3: the man. (search)
e soul were drawn with the unvarying fidelity of Nature. The family record. John Brown was married to his first wife, Dianthe Lusk, June 21, 1820, at Hudson, in Ohio. In order to make no interruptions in the narrative, or confusion of dates, I subjoin here the family record as it stood at John Brown's death. By his first wife, John Brown had seven children: John Brown, junior, July 25, 1821, at Hudson, Ohio; married Wealthy C. Hotchkiss, July, 1847. He now lives in Ashtabula County, Ohio; now fully recovered from his once dangerous malady. Jason Brown, January 19, 1823, Hudson, Ohio; married Ellen Sherboudy, July, 1847. Owen Brown, November 4, 1824, Hudson, Ohio; he escaped from Harper's Ferry. Frederick Brown, (1st,) January 9, 1827, Richmond, Pennsylvania; died March 31, 1831. Ruth Brown, February 18, 1829, Richmond, Pennsylvania; married Henry Thompson, September 26, 1850. Friederick Brown, (2d,) December 21, 1830, Richmond, Pennsylvania; murdered at Os
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 1: Whetting the sword. (search)
. Here, for the first, I learned that we were to leave Kansas to attend a military school during the winter. It was the intention of the party to go to Ashtabula County, Ohio Next morning I was sent back to Lawrence to get a draft of eighty dollars cashed, and to get Parsons, Realf, and Hinton to go back with me. I got the drafachusetts Arms patent, all of which we transported across the State of Iowa to Springdale, and from there to Liberty, at which place they were shipped for Ashtabula County, Ohio, where they remained till brought to Chambersburg, Pa., and were from there transported to a house in Washington County, Md., which Captain Brown had rentry. It was the intention of Captain Brown to sell his teams in Springdale, and, with the proceeds, to go on with the rest of the company to some place in Ashtabula County, Ohio, where we were to have a good military instructor during the winter; but he was disappointed in the sale. As he could not get cash for the teams, it was
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 6: making ready. (search)
e to take him. The liberation of those slaves was meant as a direct blow to slavery, and he laid down his platform that he considered it his duty to break the fetters from any slave when he had an opportunity. He was a thorough abolitionist. The remainder of his speech was a narration of Kansas affairs. At the close of his remarks, the audience, by resolution, indorsed and approved of his course in Kansas, for which he heartily thanked them. In the beginning of April he was in Ashtabula County, sick of the ague. On the 16th, he was at Westport, Essex County, New York--near home. On his journey there, he staid over at Peterboroa, the residence of Gerritt Smith, and at Rochester, where he delivered a public speech and met the brave negro, Shields Green, or Emperor. In May he was in Boston, New York City, and Rochester. At Boston he learned how to manufacture crackers and beef meal. On the 3d of June he was at Collinsville, and concluded the contract for the pikes afterwa
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 11: the political inquisitors. (search)
t know that I had any conversation with any of the Oberlin rescuers. I was sick part of the time I was in Ohio. I had the ague. I was part of the 41me in Ashtabula county. Mr. V. Did you see any thing of Joshua R. Giddings there? Capt. B. I did meet him. Mr. V. Did you converse with him? Capt. B. I did. I would not know the negro wanted to go back.--(To Brown.) Captain, the gentleman is right. Bystander. (To Stevens.) Where did you come from? Stevens. I lived in Ashtabula County, Ohio. Mr. B. How recently did you leave Ashtabula County? Stevens. Some months ago. I never resided there any length of time. I have often been through theAshtabula County? Stevens. Some months ago. I never resided there any length of time. I have often been through there. Mr. V. How far did you live from Jefferson? Capt. B. (To Stevens.) Be very cautious, Stevens, about an answer to that; it might commit some friend. I would not answer it at all. Stevens, who had been groaning considerably, as if the exertion necessary to conversation seriously affected him, seemed content to abide by
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 49: letters to Europe.—test oath in the senate.—final repeal of the fugitive-slave act.—abolition of the coastwise slave-trade.—Freedmen's Bureau.—equal rights of the colored people as witnesses and passengers.—equal pay of colored troops.—first struggle for suffrage of the colored people.—thirteenth amendment of the constitution.— French spoliation claims.—taxation of national banks.— differences with Fessenden.—Civil service Reform.—Lincoln's re-election.—parting with friends.—1863-1864. (search)
serving as consulgeneral. He kept up a correspondence with Sumner on affairs in this country and our relations with Canada. He had visited Washington in January, when he and Sumner met for the last time. His last letter, written April 9, when a readjustment of reciprocity with Canada was contemplated, contained a postscript, which revealed his premonitions that the end was near, saying: Should I live, I desire to be one of the commissioners to negotiate the new treaty. The bar of Ashtabula County, Ohio, of which he was a member, invited Sumner to deliver a eulogy upon him, and his son-in-law, George W. Julian, urged an acceptance; but Sumner was obliged to decline. Sumner paid, March 29, 1864, an affectionate tribute to Owen Lovejoy, a member of the House, from whom he had always received most cordial sympathy in his radical action against slavery. He used the opportunity, as was his custom, to urge the living to maintain the cause of freedom. March 29, 1864. Works, vol.
ampshire, occupied by Daniel Webster during the first years of his practice, is now an oyster saloon. The Fifty-fourth Massachusetts volunteers (negro) would not take a cent less than was given to white troops. They stood firm, and conquered, and the other day were paid off in full at white man's prices. The peace men of Delaware refuse to participate in the services of Thanksgiving Day because Governor Cannon, in his proclamation, instanced among the causes for thankfulness the "freeing of the slaves of Maryland and the prospects of a speedy declaration of universal freedom." Mrs. Joshua R. Giddings died at Jefferson, Ashtabula county, Ohio, on the 15th instant. A St. Louis paper says: "There are not less than 200,000 persons in Missouri this day who are little better than paupers, not knowing where to get food to maintain them through the winter." Professor Benjamin Silliman, Sr., of Howard University, a noted Abolition agitator, died on the 23d instant.