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George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 26 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 10 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 8 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 6 0 Browse Search
Emil Schalk, A. O., The Art of War written expressly for and dedicated to the U.S. Volunteer Army. 6 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 6 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 6 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Confederate Government at Montgomery. (search)
e British throne, the company had these steamships for sale. Mr. Prioleau secured the refusal of this fleet. The total cost of buying, arming, and fitting out the ten ships and putting them on the Southern coast ready for action was estimated at $10,000,000, or, say, 40,000 bales of cotton. The harbor of Port Royal, selected before the war as a coaling station for the United States Navy, with 26 feet of water at mean low tide, was admirably adapted for a rendezvous and point of supply. Brunswick, Georgia, was another good harbor, fit for such a fleet. The proposal was submitted to the Government through a partner of Mr. Prioleau in Charleston, Mr. George A. Trenholm, who forwarded the proposition by his son, William L. Trenholm. Its importance was not at all comprehended, and it was rejected by the executive. Captain J. D. Bulloch, the secret naval agent in Europe, who had the Alabama built, states that the Confederate Government wanted ships to cruise and to destroy the enemy'
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 3: strategy. (search)
as was from his, whilst that having at need the two secondary points of Casal and Pavia on the side of the St. Bernard, and those of Savona and Zendi on the side of the Appenines, he had, in case of reverse, all the means of regaining the Var or the Valais. In the same manner in the campaign of 1806, if he had marched from Gera straight to Leipzig; and had there awaited the Prussian army returning from Weimar, he would have been cut off from his base of the Rhine, as well as the Duke of Brunswick from that of the Elbe; whereas by moving from Gera to the west in the direction of Weimar, he placed his front of operations in advance of the three routes of Saalfield, Schleiz and Hof, which served him as lines of communication, and which he covered thus perfectly. And even if the Prussians had imagined they could cut him off from his lines of retreat by throwing themselves between Gera and Bareith, then they would have opened to him his most natural line, the fine highway from Leipzig
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 6: logistics, or the practical art of moving armies. (search)
leon would undertake, and that if the Prussians passed the Saale, it would be at Jena and at Naumburg that they would fight. What suppositions did the Duke of Brunswick and his counsellors make at the same instant that I saw so accurately? In order to credit it, it is necessary to read them in the works of Mm. C. de W. and Ruhls which alone will be able to serve as a guide for such solutions. His three volumes upon war prove evidently that in a situation like that in which the Duke of Brunswick was found in 1806, he would have been quite as embarrassed as he was as to the course which it was necessary to take. Irresolution must be the accompaniment of ad to furnish funds from his chest to give to that staff the means of sending agents into Lusace to learn where Napoleon was. General Mack at Ulm and the Duke of Brunswick in 1806 were no better informed; and the French generals in Spain often paid dear for the impossibility of having spies and information upon what was passing aro
Emil Schalk, A. O., The Art of War written expressly for and dedicated to the U.S. Volunteer Army., Example of a battle of the offensive defense: battle of Austerlitz, December 2, 1805. (search)
ce. Strength of the armies. Army of Wellington.   Battal's. Squad's. Batt's. Men. Anglo-Hanoverians 74 81 21 61,325 Netherlands 38 28 8 28,865 Brunswick 8 5 2 6,658 Nassau 3     2,900    1231143199,748 From these troops, Wellington detached about 19,000 men to Halle, to cover his right flank on the road a severe struggle. A brigade of English Guards, conducted by Cook, comes to the rescue of the battalions who defend it, and drive back the French; the troops of Brunswick replace this brigade in their position. The division of Foy backs the troops of Guilleminot, who is dangerously wounded in the shoulder; he, nevertheless, leahole French line was in movement. The Guard's advance was supported by four batteries. The English batteries fired only at the advancing battalions. The Brunswick battalions, which first presented themselves to the French Guard, were repulsed. Wellington ordered the advance of the six battalions he had kept in reserve;
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 3: Fortifications.Their importance in the defence of States proved by numerous historical examples (search)
and. this reason alone will explain how her generals sometimes succeeded in destroying an army, and even an entire state, merely by a strategic success. This may be illustrated by reference to particular campaigns. In 1792, when the Duke of Brunswick invaded France, she had no armies competent to her defence. Their numbers upon paper were somewhat formidable, it is true, but the license of the Revolution had so loosened the bonds of discipline as to effect an almost complete disorganizatiotriple line of good fortresses, although her miserable soldiery were incapable of properly defending them. The several works of the first and second lines fell, one after another, before the slow operations of a Prussian siege, and the Duke of Brunswick was already advancing upon the third, when Dumourier, with only twenty-five thousand men, threw himself into this line, and by a well-conducted war of positions, placing his raw and unsteady forces behind unassailable intrenchments, succeeded i
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 6: military Polity—The means of national defence best suited to the character and condition of a country, with a brief account of those adopted by the several European powers. (search)
orth against the maddened hordes of French democracy. The popular power, springing upward by its own elasticity when the weight of political oppression was removed, soon became too wild and reckless to establish itself on any sure basis, or even to provide for its own protection. If the attacks of the enervated enemies of France were weak, so also were her own efforts feeble to resist these attacks. The republican armies repelled the ill-planned and ill-conducted invasion by the Duke of Brunswick; but it was by the substitution of human life for preparation, system, and skill; enthusiasm supplied the place of discipline; robbery produced military stores; and the dead bodies of her citizens formed épaulements against the enemy. Yet this was but the strength of weakness; the aimless struggle of a broken and disjointed government; and the new revolutionary power was fast sinking away before the combined opposition of Europe,when the greatly genius of Napoleon, with a strong arm and i
ch we represent and that of the United States, to formally protest against such action, and against any act authorized by you or any authority of the United States that may be in contravention of such treaties. We have the honor to be, General, your most obedient servants, Mejan, Consul of France. Lorenzo Callego, Consul of Spain. Consul of Belgium,Consul of Portugal, Consul of Hanover,Vice-Consul of Italy, Consul of Brazil,Consul of England, Consul of Nassau andConsul of Austria, Brunswick,Consul of Hamburg, Consul of Greece,Consul of Wurtemburg, Consul of Bremen,Consul of Russia, Consul of Sweden andConsul of Denmark, Norway,Consul of Switzerland. On the same day Gen. Butler returned the following reply to the protest: headquarters Department of the Gulf, New-Orleans, May 12, 1862. Messrs.: I have the protest which you have thought it proper to make in regard to the action of my officers towards the Consul of the Netherlands, which action I approve and sus
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Engagements of the Civil War with losses on both sides December, 1860-August, 1862 (search)
ghes', Thornton's, Wingo's, Foster's Infantry, Rives', Campbell's Cavalry, 3d, 4th, 5th Ark., 1st Cavalry, Woodruff's, Reid's Battery, 1st, 2d Mounted Riflemen, South Kansas-Texas Mounted Regiment, 3d La. Losses: Union 223 killed, 721 wounded, 291 missing. Confed. 265 killed, 800 wounded, 30 missing. Union Brig.-Gen. Nathaniel Lyon killed. August 10, 1861: Potosi, Mo. Union, Mo. Home Guards. Losses: Union 1 killed. Confed. 2 killed, 3 wounded. August 17, 1861: Brunswick, Mo. Union, 5th Mo. Reserves. Losses: Union 1 killed, 7 wounded. August 19, 1861: Charleston or Bird's Point, Mo. Losses: Union 1 killed, 6 wounded. Confed. 40 killed. August 20, 1861: Hawk's Nest, W. Va. Losses: Union 3 wounded. Confed. 1 killed, 3 wounded. August 26, 1861: Cross Lanes or Summerville, W. Va. Losses: Union 5 killed, 40 wounded, 200 captured. August 27, 1861: ball's Cross Roads, Va. Losses: Union 1 killed, 2 wounded. A
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Yankee Doodle, (search)
the tune they recognized it as an old national dance of their own. Did Yankee Doodle come from Central Asia with the great migrations? A secretary of the American legation at Madrid says a Spanish professor of music told him that Yankee Doodle resembled the ancient sword-dance of St. Sebastian. Did the Moors bring it into Spain many centuries ago? A Brunswick gentleman told Dr. Ritter, Professor of Music at Vassar College, that the air is that of a nursery-song traditional in the Duchy of Brunswick. A surgeon in the British army, who was with the provincial troops under Johnson at the head of Lake George, being impressed with the uncouth appearance of the provincial soldiers, composed a song to the air, which he called Yankey, instead of Nankey, Doodle, and commended it to the motley soldiers as very elegant. They adopted it as good martial music, and it became very popular. The air seems to have been known in the British army, for it is recorded that when, in 1768, British tr
ther pieces of music, as far as any master shall be able to play them upon the organ, harpsichord, etc. (Phil. Tran., 1747.) Creed invented a machine for this purpose in England in 1747; Hennersdorf of Berlin, one in the following year. John Freke in England, Unger and Hohlfield in Prussia, worked at the idea. Unger formed a part of the harpsichord. The device of Hohlfield was attachable to any instrument. Descriptions were transmitted to the Academy of Berlin in 1752, and published in Brunswick in 1774. Mus′ket. (Fire-arms.) The fire-arm of the infantry soldier. It superseded the arquebus, on which it was an improvement. Formerly, smoothbore and muzzle-loading, modern progress has improved it into the rifled breech-loader of the present. See fire-arms. Mus′ket-oon. A short musket used by cavalry and artillery previous to the introduction of breechloaders. Mus′lin. (Fabric.) A bleached or unbleached thin white cotton cloth, unprinted and undyed; finer
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