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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
Chapter 4: Bristol County. The county of Bristol is bounded north by Norfolk County, east by Plymouth, south-east by Buzzard's Bay, and west by the counties of Providence, Bristol, and Newport, Rhode Island. It is divided into nineteen municipalities, of which New Bedford, Fall River, and Taunton are cities. The entire population of the county in 1860 was 93,794, in 1865 it was 89,339; being a decrease in five years of 4,455. The population in 1870 was 102,886, being an increase in five years of 13,191. The total valuation of the county in 1860 was $66,294,526, in 1865 it was $87,428,503; being an increase in five years of $21,133,983. This county gives rise to several streams, which fall into Massachusetts and Narragansett Bays, the most important of which is Taunton Great River, that in times past was famous for its herring fisheries. New Bedford and Dartmouth are well known as being the chief seats of the whale-fishery. Fall River and Taunton are largely engaged in ma
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 13: Plymouth County. (search)
Chapter 13: Plymouth County. This ancient and historic county is bounded north-east and east by Massachusetts Bay, north by Norfolk county and Boston harbor, north-west by Norfolk county, west by Bristol county, and south-east and south by Buzzard's Bay and Barnstable county. The North River, emptying into Massachusetts Bay, and numerous branches of the Taunton are its chief rivers. The shire town of the county, at which the courts are held, is Plymouth. The county has a sea coast on Massachusetts Bay of between thirty and forty miles. The land is not so fertile as in some of the other counties in the Commonwealth, yet there is considerable good land within its limits. The population of Plymouth county in 1860 was 64,758; in 1865, it was 63,074, being a decrease in five years of 1,684. The valuation in 1860 was $29,160,937; in 1865 it was $27,932,058, being a decrease in five years of $1,228,879. The county is divided into twenty-five townships, which, according to the ret