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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 2 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 2 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Irene E. Jerome., In a fair country 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 2 0 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 3, April, 1904 - January, 1905 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
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he 6th (Colonel Jones) left for Washington by rail, but at a later hour. The 3d (Colonel Wardrop) was embarked on the steamer Spalding for Fortress Monroe, but remained in the harbor till morning. The 8th The 8th M. V. M. came mainly from Essex County; the 3d and 4th mainly from Norfolk, Plymouth and Bristol; the 6th mainly from Middlesex, with one company from Boston and one from Worcester. (Colonel Munroe) was delayed by the desire to attach to it other companies; it was not ordered to preted the list of the three months volunteers, whose statistics were as follows:— Statistics of the Three Months Volunteers. Commissioned Officers.Enlisted Men.Total. Barnstable County,-66 Berkshire County37376 Bristol County21192213 Essex County71857928 Franklin County-11 Hampden County-33 Hampshire County-22 Middlesex County57882939 Norfolk County21391412 Plymouth County19333352 Suffolk County27325352 Worcester County24339363 Other States,15657 Residence not given,-3232 To
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments., Forty-eighth regiment Massachusetts Infantry (Militia). (search)
otals,–––––––––––––814 Eight companies of infantry were recruited at Camp Lander, Wenham, Mass., to form, as an Essex County organization, the 48th Infantry, Mass. Volunteer Militia, under Col. Eben F. Stone of Newburyport, but on account of the immediate demand for troops for the Banks expedition, four companies of men recruiting at Lakeville to form an Irish regiment were consolidated with six of these companies and formed in that manner the 48th Infantry; the remaining two original Essex County companies were detached to fill the ranks of the 4th Infantry, Mass. Volunteer Militia, then being organized at Lakeville for its nine months term of service. The 48th left the State for New York Dec. 27, 1862, sailed Jan. 4, 1863, for Fortress Monroe and reached New Orleans February 1. It was sent, two days later, to Baton Rouge, and became part of the 1st Brigade, 1st Division, 19th Army Corps. It took part in a reconnoissance toward Port Hudson March 13 and joined
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Irene E. Jerome., In a fair country, April days (search)
warm days. Our saccharine associations, however, remain so obstinately tropical, that it seems almost impossible for the imagination to locate sugar in New-England trees; though it is known that not the maple only, but the birch and the walnut even, afford it in appreciable quantities. Along our maritime rivers the people associate April, not with sugaring, but with shadding. The pretty Amelanchier Canadensis of Gray—the Aronia of Whittier's song—is called Shad-bush, or Shad-blow, in Essex County, from its connection with this season; and there is a bird known as the Shad-spirit, which I take to be identical with the flicker or golden-winged woodpecker, whose note is still held to indicate the first day when the fish ascend the river. Upon such slender wings flits our New-England romance! In April the creative process described by Thales is repeated, and the world is renewed by water. The submerged creatures first feel the touch of spring, and many an equivocal career, beginn
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register, Chapter 17: heresy and witchcraft. (search)
m as persecutors, and that they did not consider him to be an arch heretic. Early in 1692, a strange infatuation seized the inhabitants of Salem village, and soon spread widely. It was imagined that Satan was making a deadly assault on men through the intervention of witches. I do not propose to enter upon the general history of that tragedy; The mischief began at Salem in February; but it soon extended into various parts of the Colony. The conatgion, however, was principally the County of Essex. Before the close of September, nineteen persons were executed and one pressed to death, all of whom asserted their innocence.— Holmes' Amer. Annals, i. 438. but as one of the victims was a child of Cambridge, a brief notice of her case may be proper. Rebecca, daughter of Thomas and Rebecca Andrew, was born here, April 18, 1646, and married John Frost, June 26, 1666; he died in 1672, and she married George Jacobs, Jr., of Salem. The father of her second husband and her own daughter
e Epistles to Timothy, the Epistle to Philemon, and the Book of Revelations.—David's Annals of Evang. Nonconformity in Essex Co., England, fol. 589-591.] 4. Samuel, s. of Edward (1), resided in Scotland a few years, but returned to New England. tall, commenced preaching at Ipswich, but died 1689, leaving an only son, John, who grad. II. C. 1710, was Sheriff of Essex Co., m. Mary, dau. of President Leverett, and d. 1724, leaving one son and one daughter. See Felt Ipswich. (2)Elizabeth., corner of Dunster and Winthrop streets. After his decease, the family having become extinct here, the heirs residing in Essex and Worcester counties sold the real estate, and the noble farm of Danforth and the Foxcrofts was cut up into fragments. sage, or soon after his arrival. John [grad. H. C. 1656] settled in the ministry at or near Colchester in the county of Essex in England, where he left issue. Joseph [grad. H. C. 1658] was ordained pastor of the first church in Hartford; [d. 24
645, being then B. A., he was recommended for ordination and afterwards preached at Norwich 44 years. He died Jan. 1690. He was a voluminous writer. In Poole's Annotations, he was the author of Notes on the six last chapters of Isaiah, the whole of Jeremiah and Lamentations, the Four Evangelists, both the Epistles to the Corinthians, the Epistle to the Galatians, both the Epistles to Timothy, the Epistle to Philemon, and the Book of Revelations.—David's Annals of Evang. Nonconformity in Essex Co., England, fol. 589-591.] 4. Samuel, s. of Edward (1), resided in Scotland a few years, but returned to New England. His s. Edward was bap. in Camb. June 1664. He is said to have resided in Middletown, Conn., in 1670. (Field's Hist. Mid. Co.) The following document is recorded with the Middlesex Deeds, XI. 172: Charlestown, Nov. 1. 1691, I whose name is underwritten, do oblige myself, my heirs, executors, and assigns, to set free for himself a Mulatto Boy, which was given me by my m
ding the period of Philip's War; Commissioner of the United Colonies, eight years, and once President of that Board. He m. Patience, dau. of Gov. Thomas Dudley, by whom he had two children, who survived to maturity. (1) John, who m. Martha, dau. of Dep. Gov. Samuel Symonds, and d. 1671, leaving a daughter Martha, and a son John, who grad. H. C. 1684, m. Elizabeth Saltonstall, commenced preaching at Ipswich, but died 1689, leaving an only son, John, who grad. II. C. 1710, was Sheriff of Essex Co., m. Mary, dau. of President Leverett, and d. 1724, leaving one son and one daughter. See Felt Ipswich. (2)Elizabeth., m. John Rogers, President of Harvard College, and d. 13 June 1723, a 82. Her children were Elizabeth, m. John Appleton, Esq., and was mother of the venerable Dr. Appleton of Cambridge, and of Margaret, wife of President Holyoke; Margaret, m. Capt. Thomas Berry, and (2d) President Leverett; John, grad. H. C. 1684, minister at Ipswich, d. 28 Dec. 1745, a. 79; Daniel, grad.
s to have been much more congenial to his natural disposition than a more active employment. He heeded the request of his father and retained possession of the homestead, having obtained the rights of the other heirs by purchase, and probe. resided in the mansion-house until it was destroyed by fire 24 Jan. 1777. He afterwards owned and occupied the estate at the N. W. corner of Dunster and Winthrop streets. After his decease, the family having become extinct here, the heirs residing in Essex and Worcester counties sold the real estate, and the noble farm of Danforth and the Foxcrofts was cut up into fragments. The only considerable portion of it which remains undivided is the valuable estate of the late Professor Norton. 7. Francis, s. of Francis (3), grad. H. C. 1764, was an eminent physician in Brookfield, where he in. Sarah, dau. of Dr. Jabez Upham, 5 May 1768, and d. 15 Feb. 1814, a. 69; his w. Sarah d. at Claremont, N. II., April 1827. Their children were Sarah, m. Sa
infectious that it killed all the persons employed in putting him into his leaden coffin. On his decease Hezekiah became possessed of this estate. He was much employed in the civil wars, and a Major-general. (Morant's Hist. Essex, II. 195.) John and Roger, who came into this country with their father, sometime before his death, returned to England. Roger d. on his passage, or soon after his arrival. John [grad. H. C. 1656] settled in the ministry at or near Colchester in the county of Essex in England, where he left issue. Joseph [grad. H. C. 1658] was ordained pastor of the first church in Hartford; [d. 24 May 1679]. Mary, m. Mr. Joseph Cook in England; Ruth, Mr. Samuel Wyllys of Hartford; and Mabel, Mr. James Russell of Charlestown in Mass.; and all had issue. (Trumbull's Hist. Conn., i. 224.) Rev. Joseph Haynes of Hartford had one son John who was a gentleman of importance in the Colony, and for a time was a magistrate and judge;—and the name became extinct in the Colony<
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1841. (search)
repent of his choice, and that he thought he could make a soldier of me then, and is sure of it now. So I am entirely satisfied. And if I should come to grief, be assured it will be with a light conscience; for I have no one dependent upon me, and have not been troubled with any conflict of duties. In the same letter he thus speaks of the soldiers:-- Our regiment, the Fourteenth Massachusetts, or Essex, has as good material as ever marched out of the old Commonwealth. All from Essex County. Stalwart, sober men, all of them. Whether we succeed in drilling them to form squares, direct and oblique, or not, during the short ten days we have left, I will warrant every company of them to make face against cavalry, even in line, before turning their backs and taking to the woods. If they allow themselves to be cut up, without killing man for man, call me no prophet. The change in his mode of life seemed to transform his whole nature. This shy, contemplative, lonely, middle
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