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Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register, Chapter 17: heresy and witchcraft. (search)
m as persecutors, and that they did not consider him to be an arch heretic. Early in 1692, a strange infatuation seized the inhabitants of Salem village, and soon spread widely. It was imagined that Satan was making a deadly assault on men through the intervention of witches. I do not propose to enter upon the general history of that tragedy; The mischief began at Salem in February; but it soon extended into various parts of the Colony. The conatgion, however, was principally the County of Essex. Before the close of September, nineteen persons were executed and one pressed to death, all of whom asserted their innocence.— Holmes' Amer. Annals, i. 438. but as one of the victims was a child of Cambridge, a brief notice of her case may be proper. Rebecca, daughter of Thomas and Rebecca Andrew, was born here, April 18, 1646, and married John Frost, June 26, 1666; he died in 1672, and she married George Jacobs, Jr., of Salem. The father of her second husband and her own daughter
e Epistles to Timothy, the Epistle to Philemon, and the Book of Revelations.—David's Annals of Evang. Nonconformity in Essex Co., England, fol. 589-591.] 4. Samuel, s. of Edward (1), resided in Scotland a few years, but returned to New England. tall, commenced preaching at Ipswich, but died 1689, leaving an only son, John, who grad. II. C. 1710, was Sheriff of Essex Co., m. Mary, dau. of President Leverett, and d. 1724, leaving one son and one daughter. See Felt Ipswich. (2)Elizabeth., corner of Dunster and Winthrop streets. After his decease, the family having become extinct here, the heirs residing in Essex and Worcester counties sold the real estate, and the noble farm of Danforth and the Foxcrofts was cut up into fragments. sage, or soon after his arrival. John [grad. H. C. 1656] settled in the ministry at or near Colchester in the county of Essex in England, where he left issue. Joseph [grad. H. C. 1658] was ordained pastor of the first church in Hartford; [d. 24
645, being then B. A., he was recommended for ordination and afterwards preached at Norwich 44 years. He died Jan. 1690. He was a voluminous writer. In Poole's Annotations, he was the author of Notes on the six last chapters of Isaiah, the whole of Jeremiah and Lamentations, the Four Evangelists, both the Epistles to the Corinthians, the Epistle to the Galatians, both the Epistles to Timothy, the Epistle to Philemon, and the Book of Revelations.—David's Annals of Evang. Nonconformity in Essex Co., England, fol. 589-591.] 4. Samuel, s. of Edward (1), resided in Scotland a few years, but returned to New England. His s. Edward was bap. in Camb. June 1664. He is said to have resided in Middletown, Conn., in 1670. (Field's Hist. Mid. Co.) The following document is recorded with the Middlesex Deeds, XI. 172: Charlestown, Nov. 1. 1691, I whose name is underwritten, do oblige myself, my heirs, executors, and assigns, to set free for himself a Mulatto Boy, which was given me by my m
ding the period of Philip's War; Commissioner of the United Colonies, eight years, and once President of that Board. He m. Patience, dau. of Gov. Thomas Dudley, by whom he had two children, who survived to maturity. (1) John, who m. Martha, dau. of Dep. Gov. Samuel Symonds, and d. 1671, leaving a daughter Martha, and a son John, who grad. H. C. 1684, m. Elizabeth Saltonstall, commenced preaching at Ipswich, but died 1689, leaving an only son, John, who grad. II. C. 1710, was Sheriff of Essex Co., m. Mary, dau. of President Leverett, and d. 1724, leaving one son and one daughter. See Felt Ipswich. (2)Elizabeth., m. John Rogers, President of Harvard College, and d. 13 June 1723, a 82. Her children were Elizabeth, m. John Appleton, Esq., and was mother of the venerable Dr. Appleton of Cambridge, and of Margaret, wife of President Holyoke; Margaret, m. Capt. Thomas Berry, and (2d) President Leverett; John, grad. H. C. 1684, minister at Ipswich, d. 28 Dec. 1745, a. 79; Daniel, grad.
s to have been much more congenial to his natural disposition than a more active employment. He heeded the request of his father and retained possession of the homestead, having obtained the rights of the other heirs by purchase, and probe. resided in the mansion-house until it was destroyed by fire 24 Jan. 1777. He afterwards owned and occupied the estate at the N. W. corner of Dunster and Winthrop streets. After his decease, the family having become extinct here, the heirs residing in Essex and Worcester counties sold the real estate, and the noble farm of Danforth and the Foxcrofts was cut up into fragments. The only considerable portion of it which remains undivided is the valuable estate of the late Professor Norton. 7. Francis, s. of Francis (3), grad. H. C. 1764, was an eminent physician in Brookfield, where he in. Sarah, dau. of Dr. Jabez Upham, 5 May 1768, and d. 15 Feb. 1814, a. 69; his w. Sarah d. at Claremont, N. II., April 1827. Their children were Sarah, m. Sa
infectious that it killed all the persons employed in putting him into his leaden coffin. On his decease Hezekiah became possessed of this estate. He was much employed in the civil wars, and a Major-general. (Morant's Hist. Essex, II. 195.) John and Roger, who came into this country with their father, sometime before his death, returned to England. Roger d. on his passage, or soon after his arrival. John [grad. H. C. 1656] settled in the ministry at or near Colchester in the county of Essex in England, where he left issue. Joseph [grad. H. C. 1658] was ordained pastor of the first church in Hartford; [d. 24 May 1679]. Mary, m. Mr. Joseph Cook in England; Ruth, Mr. Samuel Wyllys of Hartford; and Mabel, Mr. James Russell of Charlestown in Mass.; and all had issue. (Trumbull's Hist. Conn., i. 224.) Rev. Joseph Haynes of Hartford had one son John who was a gentleman of importance in the Colony, and for a time was a magistrate and judge;—and the name became extinct in the Colony<