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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 38 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 18 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 18 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 12 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 12 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 6 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 6 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 6 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A review of the First two days operations at Gettysburg and a reply to General Longstreet by General Fitz. Lee. (search)
(inclusive of officers) numbered, according to Walter Taylor, at that date, 10,292. (I am satisfied, from a conversation with General Robertson, that McClellan overestimates the number of men in Jones' brigade, and therefore underestimates the number in some of the other brigades.) There is no authenticated return after the above date until August. After the return above cited, the losses at Brandy Station fight, the three days fighting in Loudoun, the encounter at Westminster, Maryland, Hanover, Pennsylvania, and other points, occurred, together with the usual reduction of mounted troops from long and rapid marching. It is proper to say that the return quoted did not include the commands of Jenkins, Imboden, or White. General Stuart, in his report (August No., 1876, Southern Historical Society Papers, p. 76,) estimated Jenkins' brigade, on leaving Virginia, at 3,800 troopers. I think this number is probably a misprint; from the best information I can get, this brigade numbered
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Advertisement (search)
,) than all he had written dogmatically. Germany produced, in this interval between the Seven Years War and that of the Revolution, a multitude of writings, more or less extensive, on different secondary branches of the art, which they illumined with a faint light. Thielke and Faesch published in Saxony, the one, fragments upon castrametation, the attack of camps and positions, the other a collection of maxims upon the accessory parts of the operations of war. Scharnhorst did as much in Hanover; Warnery published in Prussia a pretty good work on the cavalry; Baron Holzendorf another on the tactics of manoeuvres. Count Kevenhuller gave maxims upon field warfare and upon that of sieges. But nothing of all this gave a satisfactory idea of the elevated branches of the science. Finally even Mirabeau who, having returned from Berlin, published an enormous volume upon the Prussian tactics, an arid repetition of the regulation for platoon and line evolutions to which some had the sim
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 3: strategy. (search)
ticle 19, are yet present to the memory of every body. In 1805, Napoleon occupied Naples and Hanover; the Allies thought to send the Anglo-Russian corps to drive him out of Italy, and the Anglo-Russian aud Sweedish corps to repel him from Hanover; nearly sixty thousand men are destined for these two centrifugal expeditions. But whilst their troops were assembling at the two extremities of Europe, Napoleon has ordered the evacuation of Naples and Hanover; St. Cyr comes to join Massena in the Frioul, and Bernadotte, quitting Hanover, comes to take an active part in the events of Ulm and AHanover, comes to take an active part in the events of Ulm and Austerlitz: after those astonishing successes, Naples and Hanover were easily retaken. These are proofs against diversions: let us cite an example of the circumstances where they would be suitable. Hanover were easily retaken. These are proofs against diversions: let us cite an example of the circumstances where they would be suitable. In the civil wars of 1793, if the Allies had detached from their armies twenty thousand veteran troops to disembark them in Vendee, they would have produced a much greater effect than by augmenting
William A. Smith, DD. President of Randolph-Macon College , and Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy., Lectures on the Philosophy and Practice of Slavery as exhibited in the Institution of Domestic Slavery in the United States: withe Duties of Masters to Slaves., Lecture IV: the question of rights discussed. (search)
fell, not so much affected by his fate as by the means to which he owed it. Paley's Philosophy.--Moral Science. Here is an example of the greatest filial impiety, and of the highest parental affection. The one fulfils our idea of the right, the other our idea of t/e wrong. Now, what is this idea of the right (and the wrong in which all are supposed to agree? We would not ask, with the disciple of Paley, of Condillac, or of Helvetius, what the wild boy, caught years ago in the woods of Hanover, would have thought of this case; nor what the savage, without experience and without instruction, cut off in his infancy from all intercourse with his species, would think of it. No: the savage state offers us humanity in swaddling-clothes, so to speak — the germ of humanity, but not humanity entire. The true man is the perfect man of his kind: true human nature is human nature arrived at its development. M. Cousin. We utterly deny that; in order to arrive at the judgment of human natu
l hours, it becomes the duty of the undersigned, in view of treaties now existing between the governments which we represent and that of the United States, to formally protest against such action, and against any act authorized by you or any authority of the United States that may be in contravention of such treaties. We have the honor to be, General, your most obedient servants, Mejan, Consul of France. Lorenzo Callego, Consul of Spain. Consul of Belgium,Consul of Portugal, Consul of Hanover,Vice-Consul of Italy, Consul of Brazil,Consul of England, Consul of Nassau andConsul of Austria, Brunswick,Consul of Hamburg, Consul of Greece,Consul of Wurtemburg, Consul of Bremen,Consul of Russia, Consul of Sweden andConsul of Denmark, Norway,Consul of Switzerland. On the same day Gen. Butler returned the following reply to the protest: headquarters Department of the Gulf, New-Orleans, May 12, 1862. Messrs.: I have the protest which you have thought it proper to make
y cavalry who fought only mounted and with sabers. Few of his command ever bore sabers, save some of his officers, who wore them as a badge of rank. None of Forrest's men could use the saber. He himself had no knowledge of its use, but he would encounter half a dozen expert sabreurs with his revolver. General George Armstrong Custer personal recollections of a cavalryman. By J. H. Kidd, formerly Colonel, Sixth Michigan cavalry. (Ionia, Mich.) sentinel Printing Co. It was here (Hanover, Pennsylvania, June, 1863) that the brigade first saw Custer. As the men of the Sixth, armed with their Spencer rifles, were deploying forward across the railroad into a wheat-field beyond, I heard a voice new to me, directly in rear of the portion of the line where I was, giving directions for the movement, in clear, resonant tones, and in a calm, confident manner, at once resolute and reassuring. Looking back to see whence it came, my eyes were instantly riveted upon a figure only a few
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Gettysburg campaign--full report of General J. E. B. Stuart. (search)
illery, without a carriage, were captured here; the latter was spiked and left behind. We camped for the night a few miles beyond the town (Fitz. Lee's brigade in advance), halting the head of the column at Union Mills, midway between Westminister and Littlestown, on the Gettysburg road. It was ascertained here that night by scouts that the enemy's cavalry had reached Littlestown during the night and camped. Early next morning (June 30th) we resumed the march, direct by a cross route for Hanover, Pennsylvania--W. H, F. Lee's brigade in advance, Hampton in rear of the wagon train, and Fitz. Lee's brigade moving on the left flank between Littlestown and our road. About 10 A. M. the head of the column reached Hanover, and found a large column of cavalry passing through, going towards the gap of the mountains which I intended using. The enemy soon discovered our approach, and made a demonstration towards attacking us, which was promptly met by a gallant charge by Chambliss' leading r
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Berlin decree, the. (search)
Berlin decree, the. In 1803 England joined the Continental powers against Napoleon. England, offended because of the seizure of Hanover by the Prussians, at the instigation of Napoleon, made the act a pretext, in 1806, for employing against France a measure calculated to starve the empire. By Orders in Council (May 16) the whole coast of Europe from the Elbe, in Germany, to Brest, in France, a distance of about 800 miles, was declared to be in a state of blockade, when, at the same time, the British navy could not spare vessels enough from other fields of service to enforce the blockade over a third of the prescribed coast. It was essentially a paper blockade. The almost entire destruction of the French and Spanish fleets at Trafalgar, a few months before, had annihilated her rivals in the contest for the sovereignty of the seas, and she now resolved to control the trade of the world. Napoleon had dissolved the German Empire, prostrated Prussia at his feet, and, from the Imp
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), George (William Frederick) 1737-1820 (search)
bnoxious measures towards the English-American colonies, which caused great discontent, a fierce quarrel, a long war, the final dismemberment of the British empire, and the political independence of the colonies. With the Stamp Act began the terribly stormy period of the reign of George III. In 1783 he was compelled to acknowledge the independence of his lost American colonies. Then he had continual quarrels with his ministry, and talked of leaving England and retiring to his little kingdom of Hanover, but refrained on being assured that it would be much easier for him to leave England than to return to it. Like his two royal predecessors, George hated his oldest son, the Prince of Wales, because he was generally in political opposition to him and led a loose life. After a serious dispute with Russia, which threatened to seize Turkey, and another George III. with Spain, war with revolutionized France began in 1793, and the most arbitrary rule was exercised in England, drivin
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Seeman, Berthold 1825-1871 (search)
Seeman, Berthold 1825-1871 Traveller; born in Hanover, Germany, Feb. 28, 1825; educated at the University of Gottingen. In 1846 he was appointed naturalist on the British government vessel Herald, which made an exploring expedition around the world. He published Popular nomenclature of the American Flora, etc. He died in Nicaragua, Oct. 10, 1871.
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