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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
of revered memory; the schools of Rev. Archibald Campbell and Thomas Martin (the latter of whom prepared James Madison for Princeton College) in Richmond county; of Rev. James Maury, in Orange (the preceptor of Jefferson and many eminent Virginians); of Donald Robertson, of King and Queen. Virginia Schools, etc. I may add Rev. William Douglas, who taught in Goochland and Albemarle counties, and said to have been an early preceptor of Jefferson, and the classical school at Wingfield, in Hanover county; of Rev. Peter Nelson, an alumnus of William and Mary College, who died a minister of the Baptist Church. Many eminent men of Virginia and the Southern States were educated by him. In 1751 a labor school was established in Talbott county, Md., chiefly by the contributions of Virginians, and in which were fed, clothed, lodged, and taught poor children. The providence of the parish system is indicated in the appointed duty of the vestrymen in binding out pauper children, to require by co
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
re they engaged in this hard-fought battle. They subsequently were sent to the extreme left, and across the river Po to meet a flanking column of the enemy, whose intention it was to turn our left flank. General Early, who conducted this movement, pushed the sharpshooters rapidly forward, following with his line of battle, broke through the marching column, capturing a great many prisoners, and routing the remainder. At Jericho's Ford on the North Anna river, near Verdon station, in Hanover county, the corps of sharpshooters accomplished Zzzone of their best efforts. The enemy had commenced crossing the ford before the head of our column, which was the leading division, had reached the locality. On hearing of this we were double-quicked nearly two miles, and immediately deployed, facing the left, the brigade continuing the direct march. We advanced, firing as we did so, taking advantage of such protection from the trees as we could until we reached a point where a line co
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Historical sketch of the Rockbridge artillery, C. S. Army, by a member of the famous battery. (search)
r causes, by orders of the generals in command: J. Gibson Clark, October 5th; J. Gregory Clark, July 13th; George W. Conner, July 11th; John M. Goul, July 13th; Ferd. Hetterick, August 13th; James Rutherford Houston, July 25th; William Hughes, July 22d; L. S. Macon, July 31 (elected sheriff); O. M. Marshall, August 1st; Thompson B. Maury, July 19th; John H. Moore, July 20th; Phil Nelson, August 11th; W. F. Singleton, August 20th; Josiah Smith, October 13th; Walter J. Packard, died in Hanover county, August 13, 1862; Daniel Conner and Charles Grosch, joined July 27, 1862, .at Gordonsville, and left August 2d. The next pay-roll was made out near Port Royal as of December 31, 1862, and the record of the movements of the battery since its last preceding muster of October 31, 1862, near Berryville, is very brief, and as follows: November 1st, marched to Berry's Ferry; 4th, to White Post; 10th, to Winchester; 21st, started to East Virginia [no route indicated], and after fourteen s
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
The famous Lee Rangers. [from the Richmond (Va) Dispatch, Feb'y 2, 1896.] The organization, service, and Roster of this Company. This company was organized at West Point, King William county, Virginia, in June, 1861, with the following commissioned officers: Captain, William H. F. Lee; First Lieutenant, Beverley B. Douglas; Second Lieutenant, James Pollard. From West Point the company marched to camp of instruction for cavalry (at Ashland, Hanover county), where, after being drilled for several weeks by Colonels Field and Lomax, it was ordered to northwestern Virginia, where it spent the winter of 1861-‘62. In the latter part of the winter of 1862, it was ordered to Fredericksburg, where we were regularly drilled until the campaign opened in the spring, when the Ninth Regiment Virginia Cavalry was organized with the following ten companies: Company A, Stafford county, Va.; Company B, Caroline county, Va.; Company C, Westmoreland county, Va.; Company D, Lancaster county
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.29 (search)
ight so unusual puzzled our men at first, but soon finding these fellows to be in earnest, some one cried out, Kill the d——d Yankees, and instantly the three men went down as if they had suddenly melted away. I remember seeing the dust fly from their coats behind as the bullets passed through their bodies. One of these officers proved to be General Theodore Read, of the Federal army, who was in command of the detachment. I have since learned, through a lawyer friend, Walter Sydnor, of Hanover county, Va., an interesting fact concerning this officer. He says that after the war he was a student at the University of Missouri, and there met Dr. Daniel Read, the father of General Read, an elegant old gentleman, who was then the president of that institution, and that the old gentleman blamed General Grant for the death of his son, and never forgave him. He told my friend that his son was on the staff of a corps commander under General Grant, and being yery young, and ambitious of distin
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The South's Museum. (search)
the same time, to allow sufficient space for the passing of spectators. On all sides were appropriate draperies and decorations of Confederate flags, and mantels were banked with ferns, palms, and cut-flowers of different kinds. The dining-room, which has been given to Virginia, was utilized as a refreshment-room, and it was generously patronized. The ladies attended the table, serving the salads, oysters, and other delicacies. There were present prominent gentlemen and ladies from Hanover, Chesterfield, New Kent, Goochland, and Henrico counties, besides the large contingent furnished by Richmond and Manchester. During the afternoon hours a continuous stream of visitors taxed the efficiency of the policemen wisely stationed about the building, who managed the crowd so admirably, however, that at no time was there a crush or confusion. It was an agreeable study of several things, including the faithfulness of the Southern heart, that this same crowd furnished. Gravity was
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Company I, 61st Virginia Infantry, Mahone's Brigade, C. S. A. (search)
t Spotsylvania Courthouse until the 22d of May, when we took up our line of march, and on 23d crossed the North Anna river; taking our place in line, we rapidly covered our front with field works. May 27th, crossed the South Anna and entered Hanover county. May 28 and 29, 1864, battle of Hanover county. Strength of company, 43; present, 28; sick, 3; wounded, 3; detailed, 7; captured, 2. June 2nd and 3rd, battle of Cold Harbor. Strength of company, 43; present, 28; sick, 3; wounded, 3; dober 27, 1864, Burgess' Mill. Sergeant Charles Evans, October 19, 1864, Johnson's Farm. Sergeant Laban T. Godwin, October 19, 1864, Johnson's Farm.. Private Denward Hyslop, October 19, 1s864, Johnson's Farm. Private George King, October 19, 1864, Johnson's Farm. Private Thomas Peel, October 19, 1864, Johnson's Farm. Private Elias W. Cherry, July 4, 1863, Gettysburg. Private Joseph F. Hewlett, July 4, 1863, Gettysburg. Private Joseph F. Mears, May 29, 1864, Hanover county.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.43 (search)
Philadelphia. Immediately after the war the writer knew a number who had gone through this trying ordeal, as follows: Captain Jones R. Christian and Jesse Child, of Richmond, and Captain Henry St. George Coalter and Captain Darracott, of Hanover county. These have responded to the last roll-call, and those who now survive are Lieutenant S. Horace Hawes, Captain DePriest, and the writer, of Richmond, and Captain Barnes, of Chase City, Captain W. C. Nunn, West Point, Va. Following are thharlottesville. William C. Nunn, Fifth Cavalry, Little Plymouth. Peyton Alfriend, Thirty-ninth Militia, Petersburg. Bruce Gibson, Sixth cavalry, Upperville, Fauquier county. George W. Nelson, General Pendleton's staff, Beaver Dam, Hanover county. C. J. Lewis, Eighth Cavalry, Charleston, Kanawha county. Adjutants. D. M. Leyton, Twenty-fifth Infantry, Mount Meridian. B. B. Howelett, Fifth Cavalry, Cobb's creek. O. H. P. Lewis, Thirty-first Infantry, Beverly, Randolph count
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Hanover county heroes. [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, October 15, 1899.] (search)
Hanover county heroes. [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, October 15, 1899.] Partial list of soldiers from Hanover county who Perished in the war of 1861-‘65. To the Editor of the Dispatch . It is proposed to erect a memorial in Hanover Courthouse to those soldiers from Hanover county (whether in Hanover organizatiHanover county who Perished in the war of 1861-‘65. To the Editor of the Dispatch . It is proposed to erect a memorial in Hanover Courthouse to those soldiers from Hanover county (whether in Hanover organizations or otherwise), who sacrificed their lives in defence of Virginia between 1861 and 1865. We enclose a list of such, and would be greatly obliged by its publication in your Sunday Confederate columns, with the request from this committee that any one who knows of any error or omission would write a correction and send the accurHanover county (whether in Hanover organizations or otherwise), who sacrificed their lives in defence of Virginia between 1861 and 1865. We enclose a list of such, and would be greatly obliged by its publication in your Sunday Confederate columns, with the request from this committee that any one who knows of any error or omission would write a correction and send the accurate information at once to Rosewell Page, Richmond, Va. T. W. Sydnor, George P. Haw, H. T. Wickham, Rosewell Page, Committee. The list is as follows: Cavalry. Lieutenant-Colonel W. B. Newton, Fourth Virginia Cavalry, Raccoon Ford, October 1, 1863. Corps-Surgeon John B. Fontaine, Petersburg, October 1, 1864. Hanove
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Judge William Brockenbrough. (search)
gh Holmes, Phil. C. Pendleton, Spencer Roane, John M. C. Taylor, J. G. Jackson, Thos. Wilson, Phil. Slaughter, Wm. H. Cabell, Nathl. H. Claiborne, Wm. A. G. Dade, Wm. Jones. From 1826 to 1834, Judge Brockenbrough kept on in the discharge of his arduous duties as circuit judge. When he was transferred to the Supreme Court of Appeals, in 1834, he was president of the general court and presiding over the Fourth district and the Seventh circuit, composed of Chesterfield, Powhatan, Goochland, Hanover and Henrico counties. There were then in the State ten districts and twenty circuits. He had for some years presided, when the arrangement was different, over the Fourth circuit, composed of Goochland, Henrico, Hanover, King and Queen, Essex, Caroline and Spotsylvania. When he had to give up Essex, it came under the jurisdiction, for one year, of Judge Brown, and then of Judge Semple. It had been in Judge Brown's district when he held his courts in Fredericksburg and Williamsburg. In 1
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