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the Young Napoleon are struggling desperately to get out of the bogs of the Chickahominy to his gunboats on James River. I sent the carriage to Richmond a day or two ago for Mr. N., but he writes that he is sending it backwards and forwards to the battlefields for the wounded. It is a season of wide-spread distress; parties are going by constantly to seek their husbands, brothers, sons, about whose fate they are uncertain. Some old gentlemen passed yesterday, walking all the way from Lancaster County. All the boats and bridges have been destroyed on the rivers, and conveyances can't be put across. Ladies are sent from river to river by those persons who have conveyances and horses left to them. Oh, I trust that blood enough has been spilled now! Dr. S. has just arrived; he has been twenty miles below Richmond. He says the Yankee dead still lie unburied in many places-our men are too much worn out to undertake to bury them. The Yankee hospitals, as well as our own, are all alon
Judith White McGuire, Diary of a southern refugee during the war, by a lady of Virginia, July July 4th, 1862. (search)
the Young Napoleon are struggling desperately to get out of the bogs of the Chickahominy to his gunboats on James River. I sent the carriage to Richmond a day or two ago for Mr. N., but he writes that he is sending it backwards and forwards to the battlefields for the wounded. It is a season of wide-spread distress; parties are going by constantly to seek their husbands, brothers, sons, about whose fate they are uncertain. Some old gentlemen passed yesterday, walking all the way from Lancaster County. All the boats and bridges have been destroyed on the rivers, and conveyances can't be put across. Ladies are sent from river to river by those persons who have conveyances and horses left to them. Oh, I trust that blood enough has been spilled now! Dr. S. has just arrived; he has been twenty miles below Richmond. He says the Yankee dead still lie unburied in many places-our men are too much worn out to undertake to bury them. The Yankee hospitals, as well as our own, are all alon
nd a nail in the coffin of confederate independence. --At New Orleans a meeting was held to discuss the propriety of establishing a provisional State government in Louisiana.--New Orleans Era. This day the expedition, under Colonel Phelps, which left Belle Plain, Va., in steamers on Tuesday for Northumberland County, Va., returned to headquarters. The troops visited Heathsville, which they found deserted by the rebels. Then, throwing out large foraging parties from that base into Lancaster County and in other directions, they succeeded in capturing one thousand bushels of corn, fifty horses and mules, a large number of beef cattle and quite an amount of medical stores. Two post-offices and several stores were visited, and two important rebel mails captured. The cavalry also seized a large number of horses and mules. Some prisoners were also taken, among them Colonel Claybrook, a prominent rebel officer, and two clerks of the departments at Richmond, with a quantity of corresp
rings, Tenn. 4 Picket, Petersburg, July, 1864 5 Campbell's Station, Tenn. 2 Picket, Cold Harbor, June, 1864 1 Knoxville, Tenn. 1 Mine Explosion, Va. 14 Wilderness, Va. 34 Peeble's Farm, Va. 17 Spotsylvania, Va. 13 Fall of Petersburg, Va. 11 Present, also, at Fredericksburg; Vicksburg, Miss.; Ny River, Va.: Weldon Railroad; Hatcher's Run. notes.--Organized at Camp Curtin, Harrisburg, Pa., on October 21, 1861, the men having been enlisted mostly in Tioga, Centre, and Lancaster Counties. It embarked at Baltimore, November 19th, for Fort Monroe, and after remaining there a month re-embarked for Hilton Head, S. C. It returned to Virginia in August, 1862, having been assigned to Willcox's (1st) Division, Ninth Corps; Colonel Welsh was placed in command of the brigade. At South Mountain the Forty-fifth drove the Confederates from a strong position, but their gallantry cost them a loss of 27 killed and 107 wounded. In the spring of 1863, the Ninth Corps was transferred t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 12.89 (search)
the Lacy house, Sumner's headquarters, and which is directly opposite Fredericksburg and on the hill above the river. The Rappahannock, drawing its sources from the Blue Ridge mountains, drains the counties of Fauquier, Rappahannock and Culpeper, while the Rapidan,its twin sister, flowing through Madison, Green and Orange, unites with it some twelve miles above Fredericksburg. From that point the river tranquilly meanders through a beautiful country until, passing between the counties of Lancaster and Middlesex, it is lost in the waters of the Chesapeake bay. It is navigable for steamboats and small sailing vessels ninety-two miles from its mouth to Fredericksburg, the head of navigation. There are two fords between the city and the junction of the Rapidan. Three miles above by the Spotsylvania side, or six by the Stafford side, is Banks' ford, and above that is the United States, or Mine, or Bark Mill ford. On the Rappahannock, above the union of the two streams, comes first
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Washington, Mary 1706-1659 (search)
Washington, Mary 1706-1659 Mother of George Washington. She is believed to have been a lineal descendant of John Ball, the medieval champion of the rights of man, who was executed at Coventry in the year 1381 for participating in Wat Tyler's rebellion. Col. William Ball, a native of Kent, came from England with his family about the year 1650, and settled in Lancaster county, Va., where he died in 1659, leaving two sons, William and Joseph, and one daughter, Hannah. William left eight sons and one daughter, Mary, who was born in the year 1706. Joseph Ball was a well-to-do planter on the Rappahannock River, a vestryman of Christ Church in Lancaster. He was commissioned colonel by Gov. Alexander Spottswoode, and was known as Colonel Ball, of Lancaster, to distinguish him from another Colonel Ball, his cousin. When Mary Ball was about seventeen years of age she wrote to her brother in England on family matters a letter which is still in existence, the conclusion of which is a
urgess' Mill when the Confederate lines were broken. He conducted his division on the retreat and surrendered with the army on April 9th. During the following years he gave his attention to mining for a time, and then engaged in insurance at Richmond, Va. Brigadier-General Eppa Hunton Brigadier-General Eppa Hunton was born September 23, 1823, in Fauquier county, Va. The Huntons originally settled in New England, but the ancestor of General Hunton removed at an early period to Lancaster county, Va., where his great-grandfather, William Hunton, married Judith Kirk, and afterward made his home in Fauquier county. From him the descent is through his fourth son, James, and through the latter's second son Eppa. The senior Eppa Hunton was in the service of his country during the war of 1812, at Bladensburg and Craney island, and as a brigade inspector of the Virginia militia. His wife, the mother of General Hunton, was Elizabeth Marye, daughter of William Brent, who removed his fa
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
uperintendent of the South Carolina military college, the famous Citadel academy. Capt. W. T. D. Cowsar, a retired business man of Chester, is a native of Lancaster county, born in 1827. His father was Richard, son of Richard Cowsar who was born at sea while his parents were coming from Ireland to America, was a soldier of there to their bereaved parents. Colonel Garlington was a grandson of Edwin Garlington, and great grandson of Christopher and Elizabeth Conway Garlington, of Lancaster county, Va. On the maternal side he was great-grandson of Richard Parke Stobo, of South Carolina. Stobo Dickie Garlington Stobo Dickie Garlington was born in Laudicine, and in 1884 he was graduated in that profession at the South Carolina medical college at Charleston. In 1890 he was elected to the State senate from Lancaster county on the reform ticket, and the part he took in the political movements of the period were of such importance that he was elected to Congress by his district,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The life and character of William L. Saunders, Ll.D. (search)
ellation was Colonel Bill. Onward from this meeting the writer felt that he had a warm personal friend in Colonel Saunders, of whose regard he has cherished memorials, and whose death he deplores as a keen loss. William Lawrence Saunders, son of Rev. Joseph Hubbard and Laura J. (Baker) Saunders, was born in Raleigh, North Carolina, July 30, 1835, and was of Virginian ancestry; his grandfather James Saunders being a grandson of Eben Saunders a native of England, who settled in Lancaster county, Virginia, about 1675. His father dying whilst he was a lad, his mother removed, with her family to Chapel Hill, that she might educate her three sons at the university there, and he entered that institution in 1850 and graduated in the class of 1854. He subsequently read law and settled in Salisbury, where he for some time practiced his profession. He married in February, 1864, Miss Florida Cotten, of Raleigh, a sister of Mrs. Engelhard, whose husband, Major Joseph A. Engelhard had bee
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
lled for several weeks by Colonels Field and Lomax, it was ordered to northwestern Virginia, where it spent the winter of 1861-‘62. In the latter part of the winter of 1862, it was ordered to Fredericksburg, where we were regularly drilled until the campaign opened in the spring, when the Ninth Regiment Virginia Cavalry was organized with the following ten companies: Company A, Stafford county, Va.; Company B, Caroline county, Va.; Company C, Westmoreland county, Va.; Company D, Lancaster county, Va.; Company E, Spotsylvania county, Va.; Company F, Essex county, Va.; Company G, Lunenburg county, Va.; Company H, Lee Rangers, Virginia and other States and counties; Company I, King George county, Va.; Company K, Richmond county, Va. The following is the roll of Company H, Ninth Virginia Cavalry (Lee Rangers), from June, 1861, to April, 1865: Captains—William H. F. Lee, dead, B. B. Douglas, dead, Thomas W. Haynes, dead. First Lieutenants—William V. Croxton, James Pollard, de<
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