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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 112 0 Browse Search
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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The second voyage to Benin , set foorth by Master John Newton, and Master John Bird Marchants of London in the yeere 1590 with a ship called the Richard of Arundell of the burthen of one hundreth tunnes, and a small pinnesse, in which voyage Master James Welsh was chiefe Maister. (search)
ortheast. The 24 we were South from Cavo de las Palmas 37 leagues. The first of July we had sight of the Island of Brava, and it bare East 7 leagues off, and this Iland is one of the Islands of Cavo Verde. The 13 of August we spake with the Queenes ships, the Lord Thomas Howard being Admirall, and sir Richard Greenevill Viceadmirall. They kept us in their company untill the 15 day at night, themselves lying a hull, in waight for purchase 30 leagues to the Southwest of the Island of Flores . The 15 we had leave to depart with a fly-boat laden with sugar that came from Sant Thome, which was taken by the Queenes ships, whereof my Lord Admirall gave me great charge, not to leave her untill she were harbored in England. The three and twentieth the Northeast part of the Island of Corvo bare off us East and by South sixe leagues off. The 17 of September we met with a ship of Plimouth that came out of the West Indies, but she could tell us no newes. The next day we had sig
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of the ship called the Marigold of M. Hill of Redrife unto Cape Briton and beyond to the latitude of 44 degrees and an half, 1593 Written by Richard fisher Master Hilles man of Redriffe. (search)
heast Cods, and better then those of Newfoundland . From our arrivall at the haven of Saint Francis in Newfoundland , (which was as is aforesayde the eleventh of July) we continued beating up and downe on the coast of Arambec to the West and Southwest of Cape Briton untill the twentie eight of September, fully by the space of eleven weekes: and then by the perswasion of our Master and certaine others wee shaped our course homeward by the Isles of the Acores, and came first to Corvo and Flores , where beating up and downe, and missing of expected pray, we sayled by Tercera, and from thence to Saint Michael, where we sought to boorde a Portugall shippe, which we found too well appointed for us to bring along with us, and so being forced to leave them behinde and having wasted all our victuals, wee were constrained against our willes to hasten home unto our narrowe Seas: but it was the two and twentieth of December before wee could get into the Downes: where for lacke of winde wee k
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The Voyages and Navigations of the English nation to Virginia , and the severall discoveries therof chiefly at the charges of the honourable Sir Walter Ralegh knight, from 33 to 40 degrees of latitude: together with the successe of the English colonies there planted: as likewise a description of the Countrey, with the Inhabitants, and the manifold commodities. Whereunto are annexed the patents, letters, discourses, &c. to this part belonging. (search)
ill the seventeenth of September, at which time wee fell with Corvo , and sawe Flores . September.THE eighteenth, perceiving of allunt we judged our selves to be about twentie leagues to the West of Cuervo and Flores , but about night the storme ceased, and fayre weather ensued. On Thursday the seventeenth wee saw Cuervo and Flores , but we could not come to anker that night, by reason the winde shifted. The next Morning being the eighteenth, standing in. of September we came to an Ancre neere a small village on the North side of Flores , where we found ryding 5. English men of warre, of whom wee understood that oue was the Moonelight our consort, who upon the first sight of our comming into Flores , set sayle and went for England , not taking any leave of us. On Sunday thell of the Queenes fleete, wherein was Generall Sir John Hawkins, stood in with Flores , and divers other of the Queenes ships, namely the Hope, the Nonpareilia, the
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The fourth voyage made to Virginia with three ships, in the yere 1587. Wherein was transported the second Colonie. (search)
thelesse they assayed presently againe to wey their anker, but being so weakened with the first fling, they were not able to weye it, but were throwen downe and hurt the second time. Wherefore having in all but fifteene men aboord, and most of them by this unfortunate beginning so bruised, and hurt, they were forced to cut their Cable, and leese their anker. Neverthelesse, they kept company with the Admirall, untill the seventeenth of September, at which time wee fell with Corvo , and sawe Flores . September.THE eighteenth, perceiving of all our fifteene men in the Flyboate there remained but five, which by meanes of the former mischance, were able to stand to their labour: and that the Admirall meant not to make any haste for England , but to linger about the Island of Tercera for purchase: the Flyboate departed for England with letters, where we hoped by the help of God to arrive shortly: but by that time we had continued our course homeward about
eady had weyed anker, and rode without the barre, the Admirall riding by them, who but the same morning was newly come thither againe. The same day both the ships weyed anker, and set saile for England : at this weying their ankers, twelve of the men which were in the Flyboate were throwen from the Capstone, which by meanes of a barre and brake, came so fast about upon them, that the other two barres thereof strooke and hurt most of them so sore, that some of them never recovered it: neverthelesse they assayed presently againe to wey their anker, but being so weakened with the first fling, they were not able to weye it, but were throwen downe and hurt the second time. Wherefore having in all but fifteene men aboord, and most of them by this unfortunate beginning so bruised, and hurt, they were forced to cut their Cable, and leese their anker. Neverthelesse, they kept company with the Admirall, untill the seventeenth of September, at which time wee fell with Corvo , and sawe Flores .
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The fift voyage of M. John White into the West Indies and parts of America called Virginia , in the yeere 1590. (search)
this time by account we judged our selves to be about twentie leagues to the West of Cuervo and Flores , but about night the storme ceased, and fayre weather ensued. On Thursday the seventeenth wee saw Cuervo and Flores , but we could not come to anker that night, by reason the winde shifted. The next Morning being the eighteenth, standing in againe with Cuervo, we escryed a sayle ahead us, tn Saturday the 19. of September we came to an Ancre neere a small village on the North side of Flores , where we found ryding 5. English men of warre, of whom wee understood that our Viceadmirall an One of these five was the Moonelight our consort, who upon the first sight of our comming into Flores , set sayle and went for England , not taking any leave of us. On Sunday the 20. the Mary Rose, Admirall of the Queenes fleete, wherein was Generall Sir John Hawkins, stood in with Flores , and divers other of the Queenes ships, namely the Hope, the Nonpareilia, the Rainebow, the Swift-sure,
this time by account we judged our selves to be about twentie leagues to the West of Cuervo and Flores , but about night the storme ceased, and fayre weather ensued. On Thursday the seventeenth wee saw Cuervo and Flores , but we could not come to anker that night, by reason the winde shifted. The next Morning being the eighteenth, standing in againe with Cuervo, we escryed a sayle ahead us, tn Saturday the 19. of September we came to an Ancre neere a small village on the North side of Flores , where we found ryding 5. English men of warre, of whom wee understood that our Viceadmirall an One of these five was the Moonelight our consort, who upon the first sight of our comming into Flores , set sayle and went for England , not taking any leave of us. On Sunday the 20. the Mary Rose, Admirall of the Queenes fleete, wherein was Generall Sir John Hawkins, stood in with Flores , and divers other of the Queenes ships, namely the Hope, the Nonpareilia, the Rainebow, the Swift-sure,
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The principal voyages of the English Nation to the Isles of Trinidad, Margarita, Dominica , Deseada, Monserrate, Guadalupe , Martinino, and all the rest of the Antilles ; As likewise to S. Juan de Puerto Rico, to Hispaniola, Jamaica and Cuba : and also to Tierra Firma, and all along the coast and Islands therof, even from Cumana and the Caracos to the neckland of Dariene, and over it to the Gulfe of S. Michael and the Isle of Perles in the South sea: and further to Cabeca Cativa, Nombre de dios, and Venta de cruzes, to Puerto Belo, Rio de Chagre, and the Isle of Escudo, along the maine of Beragua, to the Cape and Gulfe of the Honduras, to Truxillo, Puerto de Cavallos, and all other the principall Townes, Islands and harbours of accompt within the said Gulfe, and up Rio dolce falling into this Gulfe, above 30. leagues : As also to the Isle of Cocumel, and to Cape Cotoche, the towne of Campeche , and other places upon the land of lucatan; and lower downe to S. Juan de Ullua, Vera Cruz, Rio de Panuco, Rio de Palmas, &c. within the Bay of Mexico: and from thence to the Isles of the Tortugas, the port of Havana , the Cape of Florida, and the Gulfe of Bahama homewards. With the taking, sacking, ransoming, or burning of most of the principall Cities and townes upon the coasts of Tierra firma, Nueva Espanna, and all the foresaid Islands; since the most traiterous burning of her Majesties ship the Jesus of Lubec and murthering of her Subjects in the port of S. Juan de Ullua, and the last generall arrest of her Highnesse people, with their ships and goods throughout all the dominions of the King of Spaine in the moneth of June 1585. Besides the manifold and tyrannicall oppressions of the Inquisition inflicted on our nation upon most light and frivolous occasions. (search)
ed our course from Florida homeward by the isle of Flores one of the Azores , where we watered, finding sir J in greatest extremitie, till I came to the yles of Flores and Cuervo: whither I made the more haste, hoping t The 28 we were in 39 degrees, and stood away for Flores , which the 8 of Aprill we saw, and the 9 came to aner to the Westward of the point of Santa Cruz under Flores : but before midnight we drave, and set saile the neu be in 39. degrees and 1/2, which is the height of Flores : and thou shalt goe to the Northward of Bermuda. Anthe Compasse. And thus thou shalt find the isles of Flores and Cuervo, which stand in 39. degrees 1/2, and in e markes be these.* Thou mayest goe from betwixt Flores and Cuervo, and must goe East Southeast, and so thom thence stir away East for the Isle of Fayal or of Flores . Markes to know the Isle of Fayal. know the Isle of Flores.IF you happen to fall with Flores first, by this you shall know it: the Island lyeth
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A true report of a voyage undertaken for the West Indies by M. Christopher Newport Generall of a fleete of three shippes and a pinnesse, viz. The golden Dragon Admirall, whereof was Captaine M. Newport himselfe; The Prudence Vice-admirall, under the conduct of Captaine Hugh Merrick; The Margaret under Captaine Robert Fred; and The Virgin our pinnesse under Captaine Henry Kidgil: Begun from London the 25. of Januarie 1591. Written by M. John Twitt of Harewich, Corporall in the Dragon. In which voyage they tooke and burnt upon the coast of Hispaniola, within the bay of Honduras , and other places, 3. townes, and 19. saile of shippes and frigats. (search)
up in seynes. We lightened them of their hogges and tabacco, and sent the men away with their frigat. In this voyage we tooke and sacked foure townes, seventeene frigats, and two ships, whereof eight were taken in the bay of the Honduras ; of all which we brought but two into England : the rest we sunke, burnt, and one of them we sent away with their men. And to make up the full number of twenty, the Spanyards themselves set one on fire in the bay of the Honduras , lest we should be masters of it. We shaped our course from Florida homeward by the isle of Flores one of the Azores , where we watered, finding sir John Burgh there, who tooke us to be Spanyards, and made up unto us; with whom wee joyned in the taking the mighty Portugall caracke called Madre de Dios, and our captaine M. Christopher Newport with divers of us was placed in her as captaine by the Generall sir John Burgh to conduct her into England , where we arrived in Dartmouth the seventh of September 1592.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A voyage of the honourable Gentleman M. Robert Duddeley, now knight, to the isle of Trinidad , and the coast of Paria: with his returne home by the Isles of Granata, Santa Cruz, Sant Juan de puerto rico, Mona , Zacheo, the shoalds called Abreojos, and the isle of Bermuda . In which voyage he and his company tooke and sunke nine Spanish ships, wherof one was an armada of 600 tunnes. Written at the request of M. Richard Hakluyt. (search)
etweene this yland of S. Juan de puerto rico and Hispaniola) by a little yland called Zacheo. And after carefully doubling the shouldes of Abreojos, I caused the Master, (hearing by a Pilote, that the Spanish fleete ment now to put out of Havana ) to beare for the Meridian of the yle of Bermuda , hoping there to finde the fleete dispersed. The fleete I found not, but foule weather enough to scatter many fleetes; which companion left mee not in greatest extremitie, till I came to the yles of Flores and Cuervo: whither I made the more haste, hoping to meete some great Fleete of her Majestie my sovereigne, as I had intelligence, and to give them advise of this rich Spanish fleet: but finding none, and my victuals almost spent, I directed my course for England . Returning alone, and worse manned by halfe then I went foorth, my fortune was to meete a great Armada of this fleete of some 600. tunnes well appointed, with whom I fought board and board for two dayes, being no way able in al
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