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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The First attack on Fort Fisher (search)
al sand-hill, thirty feet in height, with four cannon upon it, and named Battery Buchanan. These constituted the defenses on Federal Point, and commanded the entrance to the Cape Fear river by New Inlet. About seven miles southwest from Fort Fisher, at Smithville, on the right of the old entrance to the Cape Fear, was Fort Johnson; and about a mile south of that was Fort Caswell. The latter and Fort Fisher were the principal guardians of the port of Wilmington. At Baldhead Point, on Smith's Island, was Battery Holmes. These were the works which the government proposed to turn or assail after Farragut had effectually closed the port of Mobile, in August, 1864. Wilmington was then the only refuge for blockade-runners on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts. The National Government considered several plans for capturing and holding the city of Wilmington. One, submitted by Frederic Kidder, of Boston, seemed most promising of success. Mr. Kidder proposed to have a fleet of flat-bottome
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Expedition against Fort Fisher-attack on the Fort-failure of the expedition-second expedition against the Fort-capture of Fort Fisher (search)
d in their assault on the bastion, rendered the best service they could by reinforcing Terry's northern line-thus enabling him to send a detachment to the assistance of Ames. The fleet kept up a continuous fire upon that part of the fort which was still occupied by the enemy. By means of signals they could be informed where to direct their shots. During the succeeding nights the enemy blew up Fort Caswell on the opposite side of Cape Fear River, and abandoned two extensive works on Smith's Island in the river. Our captures in all amounted to 169 guns, besides small-arms, with full supplies of ammunition, and 2,083 prisoners. In addition to these, there were about 700 dead and wounded left there. We had lost 110 killed and 536 wounded. In this assault on Fort Fisher, Bell, one of the brigade commanders, was killed, and two, Curtis and Pennypacker were badly wounded. Secretary Stanton, who was on his way back from Savannah, arrived off Fort Fisher soon after it fell.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
t. This reconnaissance disclosed the fact that the front of the work had been seriously injured by the navy fire. In the afternoon of the 15th the fort was assaulted, and after most desperate fighting was captured with its entire garrison and armament. Thus was secured, by the combined efforts of the navy and army, one of the most important successes of the war. Our loss was: Killed, 110; wounded, 536. On the 16th and 17th the enemy abandoned and blew up Fort Caswell and the works on Smith's Island, which were immediately occupied by us. This gave us entire control of the mouth of the Cape Fear River. Subordinate reports of Terry's expedition will appear in Vol. XLVI. At my request Maj. Gen. B. F. Butler was relieved, and Maj. Gen. E. O. C. Ord assigned to the command of the Department of Virginia and North Carolina. The defense of the line of the Tennessee no longer requiring the force which had beaten and nearly destroyed the only army threatening it, I determined to fi
July 12. This morning a portion of the fleet blockading the port of Wilmington, N. C., ran a rebel vessel on shore, close in by the edge of Smith's Island. While trying to get her off, the rebels in Fort Fisher despatched a steamer with a battery on board to prevent it. She had been at Smith's Island but a short time When a fire was opened from the National fleet on the eastern side of the shoals. At the same time a party of rebels was discovered approaching with a piece of artillery. Smith's Island but a short time When a fire was opened from the National fleet on the eastern side of the shoals. At the same time a party of rebels was discovered approaching with a piece of artillery. Upon this, the fleet on the western side of the shoals opened fire to prevent the reenforcement of the rebels, and finally succeeded. The firing was continued until four o'clock, when the Union fleet returned to its station.--the blockade-runner Emma was captured by the Union transport steamer Arago.--Hagerstown and Funkstown, Md., were occupied by the Union forces after a slight engagement.--(Doc. 32.) Natchez, Miss., was occupied by a detachment belonging to General Grant's army.
August 3. The exigencies under which one hundred thousand militia, for six months service, from the States of Maryland, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West-Virginia were called out by the President's proclamation of June fifteenth, 1863, having passed, it was ordered by the President that enlistments under that call be discontinued.--Horatio Seymour addressed a letter to President Lincoln, requesting him to suspend the draft for troops in New York, and elaborately setting forth his reasons therefore.--the lighthouse on Smith's Island, in the Chesapeake Bay, was destroyed by a party of rebels.
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 17: Sherman's March through the Carolinas.--the capture of Fort Fisher. (search)
n the shore of the Cape Fear, across from Mound Battery, was another sand-hill, thirty feet in height, with four cannon upon it, named Battery Buchanan. These constituted the defenses on Federal Point, and commanded the entrance to the Cape Fear, by New Inlet. About seven miles southwest from Fort Fisher, at Smithville, on the old entrance to the Cape Fear, was Fort Johnson; and about a mile south of that work was Fort Caswell. The latter and Fort Fisher were the principal works. On Smith's Island, at Baldhead Point, was Battery Holmes. Foiled in its efforts to absolutely close that port, the Government considered plans for capturing and holding the city. Among others was one submitted by Frederic Kidder, a citizen of Boston, who had for many years held intimate commercial and social relations with Wilmington, and was well acquainted with the country and the coast far around it. Hie had found means of communication with Wilmington during the war; and so early as the beginning
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 18: capture of Fort Fisher, Wilmington, and Goldsboroa.--Sherman's March through the Carolinas.--Stoneman's last raid. (search)
ccompanied by Blackman's regiment; and then the whole of the garrison not already in the hands of Terry, were captured, including Colonel Lamb, the commander of the fort, and General Whiting, who was mortally wounded. The fall of Fort Fisher rendered all the other works at the mouth of the Cape Fear River untenable, and during the nights of the 16th and 17th, Jan., 1865. the Confederates blew up Fort Caswell, on the right an, bank of the river. They also abandoned Battery Holmes, on Smith's Island, and their extensive works at Smithville and Reeves's Point, and fled toward Wilmington. The triumph of the army and navy was now complete. The National loss in the attack was 681 men, of whom 88 were killed, 501 wounded, and 92 missing. Among the wounded was acting Brigadier-General Bell, mortally, and Generals Curtis and Pennybacker, severely. On the morning after the victory, while the exultant soldiers and sailors were swarming into the fort, its principal magazine, deep in the
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 35: operations of the North Atlantic Squadron, 1863. (search)
expeditions as accomplished important results. Our pages are limited, and we desire to make them as bright as possible. On the 31st of July, 1863, the steamer Kate, belonging to the Confederates, while going into Wilmington, was driven on Smith's Island Beach by the gun-boat Penobscot, but was eventually floated off by the enemy, and towed under the batteries at New Inlet. Early in the morning of the 1st of August, the blockading vessels, James Adger, Mount Vernon and Iroquois, approachederself went alongside, and sent another party on board at the same time. A hawser was made fast to the prize, and she was towed out. The Confederate batteries at New Inlet opened with great vigor, and a masked battery of Whitworth guns on Smith's Island kept up a furious fire. The enemy did not seem to be particular in his aim, as an 80--pounder Armstrong rifle-shot passed through the port-side of the Kate, and out through the starboard bulwarks, just as the Mount Vernon and her boats board
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 50: Second attack on Fort Fisher. (search)
by troops. serious damage to Confederate cause. Grappling for torpedoes. the Tallahassee and Chickamauga blown up. evacuation of Fort Caswell and works on Smith's Island. Wilmington, N. C., blockaded. list of officers killed and wounded during attack on Fort Fisher. General orders of second attack. reports of the admiral aer was the fall of all the surrounding works in and near this place--Fort Caswell, a large work at the West Inlet, mounting twenty-nine guns, all the works on Smith's Island, the works between Caswell and Smithsville up to the battery on Reeves' Point, on the west side of the river — in all, 169 guns falling into our hands; 2 stea8-inch guns — total 29; forts Campbell and Shaw, six 10-inch, six 32-pounder smooth-bore, one 32-pounder rifled, one 8-inch, six field-pieces and two mortars; Smith's Island, three 10-inch guns, six 32-pounder smooth-bores, two 22-pounders rifled, four field-pieces, 2 mortars and six other guns. Grand total, 83 guns. When Gene
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 51: effects of the fall of Fort Fisher, and criticisms on General Badeau's military history of General Grant. (search)
. The reconnaissance disclosed the fact that the front of the work had been seriously injured by the Navy fire. In the afternoon of the 15th the fort was assaulted, and after most deperate fighting was captured with its entire garrison and armament. Thus was secured, by the combined efforts of the Navy and Army, one of the most important successes of the war. Our loss was, killed, 110; wounded, 536. On the 16th and 17th, the enemy abandoned and blew up Fort Caswell and the works on Smith's Island, which were immediately occupied by us. This gave us entire control of the mouth of the Cape Fear River. In vol. 3. page 224, of his work, the military historian states as follows: While thus zealously watching the varied interests and changing circumstances in Georgia and Tennessee, as well as at Richmond and in the valley, Grant had also planned [!] to take advantage of Sherman's march by a new movement on the At lantic coast. Wilmington, near the mouth of Cape Fear River, i
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