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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Erie, Lake, battle on. (search)
announced the appearance of the British fleet, clearly seen in the northwestern horizon. Very soon Perry's nine vessels were ready for the enemy. At the mast-head of the Lawrence was displayed a blue banner, with the words of Lawrence, the dying captain, in large white letters Don't give up the Put-in-bay—smoke of battle seen in the distance. ship. The two squadrons slowly approached each other. The British squadron was commanded by Com. Robert H. Barclay, who fought with Nelson at Trafalgar. His vessels were the ship Detroit, nineteen guns, and one pivot and two howitzers; ship Queen Charlotte, seventeen, and one howitzer; brig Lady Prevost, thirteen, and one howitzer; brig Hunter, ten; sloop Little Belt, three; and schooner Chippewa, one, and two swivels. The battle began at noon, at long range, the Scorpion, commanded by young Sailing-Master Stephen Champlin, then less than twenty-four years of age, firing the first shot on the American side. As the fleets drew nearer an
ted to drown, rather than be rescued from the grasp of his naval commander by a neutral. I desire to show how a Christian admiral forbade his enemies to be fired upon, when they were engaged in rescuing their people from drowning; even though the consequence of such rescue should be the escape of the prisoners. I allude to Lord Collingwood, a name almost as well known to American as to English readers; the same Lord Collingwood, who was second in command to Nelson at the famous battle of Trafalgar. This Admiral, from his flag-ship, the Ocean, issued the following general order to the commanders of his ships:— Ocean, September 19, 1807. In the event of an action with the enemy, in which it shall happen that any of their ships shall be in distress, by taking fire, or otherwise, and the brigs and tenders, or boats which are attached to their fleet, shall be employed in saving the lives of the crews of such distressed ships, they shall not be fired on, or interrupted in suc
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
am in 1828, and Earl of Durham in 1833. He was sent on a special mission to Russia in 1833, and was an ambassador to that country in 1836; was sent to Canada in 1838 as Governor-General, with extraordinary powers, at the time of the Rebellion. See sketch in Brougham's Autobiography, Vol. III. p. 335. Lord D. wrote to Joseph Parkes, asking him to bring Sumner to dine at Cleveland Row. we had an interesting party. There were Sir Edward Codrington; 1770-1851; admiral; distinguished at Trafalgar and Navarino. Sir William Molesworth; 1810-1855; member of Parliament; colleague of John Austin on a commission of inquiry into the administration of the government of Malta, and, in 1855, Secretary of the Colonies. At the suggestion of George Grote, he edited the works of Thomas Hobbes. He was associated with John Stuart Mill in editing the Westminster Review; and was a friend of Mr. Grote, in whose Personal Life, prepared by Mrs. Grote, he is frequently mentioned. Charles Buller;
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, London, Jan. 12. (search)
am in 1828, and Earl of Durham in 1833. He was sent on a special mission to Russia in 1833, and was an ambassador to that country in 1836; was sent to Canada in 1838 as Governor-General, with extraordinary powers, at the time of the Rebellion. See sketch in Brougham's Autobiography, Vol. III. p. 335. Lord D. wrote to Joseph Parkes, asking him to bring Sumner to dine at Cleveland Row. we had an interesting party. There were Sir Edward Codrington; 1770-1851; admiral; distinguished at Trafalgar and Navarino. Sir William Molesworth; 1810-1855; member of Parliament; colleague of John Austin on a commission of inquiry into the administration of the government of Malta, and, in 1855, Secretary of the Colonies. At the suggestion of George Grote, he edited the works of Thomas Hobbes. He was associated with John Stuart Mill in editing the Westminster Review; and was a friend of Mr. Grote, in whose Personal Life, prepared by Mrs. Grote, he is frequently mentioned. Charles Buller;
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 30: addresses before colleges and lyceums.—active interest in reforms.—friendships.—personal life.—1845-1850. (search)
translated the Exegi monumentum, and the orations against Catiline. Nelson, in his single interview with Wellington, whom he did not at the time know, talked of himself in so vain a style, even like a charlatan, as almost to disgust the latter, but a few moments later seemed a different man, when learning who his companion was he talked like an officer and statesman; The Croker Papers, vol. II. p 233. Oct. 1, 1834. and yet Nelson had fought at Santa Cruz and Aboukir, and was to die at Trafalgar. John Adams's vanity was proverbial. To him praise was always sweet incense; and yet so sterling was his patriotism that no flattery in a foreign court or at home could swerve him a hair's-breadth from devotion to his country. The historian, Bancroft, in a conversation with the writer, made a comment on John Adams, which in substance corresponds with the text. When power exists in a man, he will rarely fail to know it. Merit and modesty, it has been wittily said, have nothing in commo
Death of a British naval offices. --The English papers record the death of Commander Richard Bayly Bowden, R. N., aged sixty-nine. The deceased entered the navy in 1803, and served as midshipman of the Britannia at the battle of Trafalgar. He afterwards served throughout the operations of 1867, against Copenhagen, and continued actively employed until 1814, when he joined the Orlando, and served in the Chesapeake Bay during the American war.