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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 238 0 Browse Search
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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The booke of the great and mighty Emperor of Russia, and Duke of Moscovia, and of the dominions orders and commodities thereunto belonging: drawen by Richard Chancelour. (search)
n a place called Postesora, which bring them upon Hartes to Lampas to sell, and from Lampas carie them to a place called Colmogro, where the hie market is holden on Saint Nicholas day. To the West of Colmogro there is a place called Gratanove, in ourides, and at a place called Plesco: and thereabout is great store of Flaxe, Hempe, Waxe, Honie; and that towne is from Colmogro 120 miles. There is a place called Vologda; the commodities whereof are Tallowe, Waxe, and Flaxe: but not so great plenty as is in Gratanove. From Vologda to Colmogro there runneth a river called Duyna, and from thence it falleth into the sea. Colmogro serveth Gratanowe, Vologda and the Mosco with all the countrey thereabout with salte and saltfish. From VologdColmogro serveth Gratanowe, Vologda and the Mosco with all the countrey thereabout with salte and saltfish. From Vologda to Jeraslave is two hundreth miles: which towne is very great. The commodities thereof are hides, and tallowe, and corne in great plenty, and some Waxe, but not so plentifull as in other places. The Mosco is from Jeraslave two hundreth miles. Th
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The coines, weights and measures used in Russia , written by John Hasse, in the yere, 1554. (search)
y, it is to be understood, that there is a certaine place foure score miles from the Sea called Colmogro: to which place there resorte all the sortes of Wares that are in the North parts, as Oyles, Sa of the Bay where our shippes came in: they make it in the Spring of the yeere, and bring it to Colmogro to sell, and the merchants there care it to Novogrode, and so sell it to the Dutch nation. Theirie to Novogrode, and sell it there to the Lieflanders. The Furres and Fethers which come to Colmogro, as Sables, Beavers, Minkes, Armine , Lettis, Graies, Woolverings, and white Foxes, with Deere avage people: and the merchants that bring these Furres doe use to trucke with the merchants of Colmogro for Cloth, Tinne, Batrie, & such other like, and the merchants of Colmogro carie them to NovogrColmogro carie them to Novogrode, Vologda, or Mosco, & sell them there. The Fethers which come from Penning they doe little esteeme. If our merchants do desire to know the meetest place of Russia for the standing house, in m
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The letter of M. George Killingworth the companies first Agent in Moscovie, touching their interteinement in their second voyage. Anno 1555. the 27. of November in Mosco. (search)
God, save onely William our cooke as we came from Colmogro fell into the river out of the boate, and was drow me thinks you shall do best to have your house at Colmogro, which is but 100. miles from the right discharge l our marchants shall bring all our marchandize to Colmogro to you, and so shall our marchants neither go emptg other talke, we moved, that if we should tary at Colmogro with our wares, and should not come to Vologda, or further to seeke our market, but tary stil at Colmogro, and then the marchants of the Mosco and others should that if they should come and bring their wares to Colmogro, and that they should not find wares there sufficit we do appoint with them to bring their wares. to Colmogro, God willing, they should never come thither, but not, but that we shall have neede of one house at Colmogro, and another at Vologda, and if that they bring not their wares to Colmogro, then wee shalbe sure to buy some at Vologda, and to be out of bondage. And thus
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Certaine instructions delivered in the third voyage, Anno 1556. for Russia , to every Purser and the rest of the servants, taken for the voyage, which may serve as good and necessary directions, to all other like adven turers. (search)
aboord to take fish with, that such fish so taken may bee eaten for the cause aforesayd : and if there bee no such engines aboord, then to provide some before you goe from hence. 8 And when God shall send you in safetie into the Bay of S. Nicholas at an anker, you shall goe a shore with the first boate that shall depart from the ship, taking with you such letters as you have to deliver to the Agent there: and if he be not there at your comming a land, then send the companies letters to Colmogro to him by some sure mariner or otherwise, as the master and you shall thinke best, but goe not your selfe at any hand, nor yet from aboord the ship, unlesse it bee a shore to treate with the Agent for the lading of the ship that you be appointed in, which you shall applie diligently to have done so speedily as may be. And for the discharging of the goods therein in the Bay, to be carried from thence, see that you doe looke well to the unlading thereof, that there be none other goods sent a
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The Navigation and discoverie toward the river of Ob, made by Master Steven Burrough, Master of the Pinnesse called the Serchthrift, with divers things worth the noting passed in the yere 1556. (search)
uld. While I was thus banketing of them, there came another of their skiffes aboord with one who was a Keril, whose name afterwards I learned, & that he dwelt in Colmogro, & Gabriel dwelled in the towne of Cola, which is not far from the rivers mouth. This foresaid Keril said unto me that one of the ankers which I borowed was his,f Vaigats, where we saw two small lodias, the one of them came aboord of us, and presented me with a great loafe of bread: and they told me that they were all of Colmogro, except one man that dwelt at Pechora, who seemed to be the chiefest among them in killing of the Morse. There were some of their company on shoare, which didWest Sunne we sounded and had 20. fathoms, and broken Wilkeshels: I reckoned Canonize to be 24. leagues Northnortheast from us. The eleventh day we arrived at Colmogro, and there we wintered, expecting the approch of the next Sommer to proceede farther in our intended discoverie for the Ob: which (by reason of our imploiments t
very much friendship, and rejoiced to see us againe, declaring that they earnestly thought that we had bene lost. This Gabriel declared unto me, that they had saved both the ankers and our hauser, and after we had thus communed, I caused 4 or 5 of them to goe into my cabbin, where I gave them figs, and made them such cheere as I could. While I was thus banketing of them, there came another of their skiffes aboord with one who was a Keril, whose name afterwards I learned, & that he dwelt in Colmogro, & Gabriel dwelled in the towne of Cola, which is not far from the rivers mouth. This foresaid Keril said unto me that one of the ankers which I borowed was his, I gave him thanks for the lone of it, thinking it had bene sufficient. And as I continued in one accustomed maner, that if the present which they brought were worth enterteinment, they had it accordingly, he brought nothing with him, & therfore I regarded him but litle. And thus we ended, & they took their leave and went a shor
ay, as we plied to the Eastwards, we espied another saile, which was one of this Loshaks company, and we bare roome, and spake with him, who in like sort tolde us of the Ob, as the other had done. Thursday, we plied to the Eastwards, the winde being at Eastnortheast. Friday, the gale of winde began to increase, and came Westerly withall, so that by a Northwest sunne we were at an anker among the Islands of Vaigats, where we saw two small lodias, the one of them came aboord of us, and presented me with a great loafe of bread: and they told me that they were all of Colmogro, except one man that dwelt at Pechora, who seemed to be the chiefest among them in killing of the Morse. There were some of their company on shoare, which did chase a white beare over the high clifs into the water, which beare the lodia that was aboord of us killed in our sight. This day there was a great gale of wind at North, and we saw so much ice driving a seaboord, that it was then no going to sea.
September. TUESDAY at a West Sunne we sounded and had 20. fathoms, and broken Wilkeshels: I reckoned Canonize to be 24. leagues Northnortheast from us. The eleventh day we arrived at Colmogro, and there we wintered, expecting the approch of the next Sommer to proceede farther in our intended discoverie for the Ob: which (by reason of our imploiments to Wardhouse the next spring for the search of some English ships) was not accordingly performed.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of the foresaid M. Stephen Burrough, An. 1557. from Colmogro to Wardhouse, which was sent to seeke the Bona Esperanza, the Bona Confidentia, and the Philip and Mary, which were not heard of the yeere before. (search)
The voyage of the foresaid M. Stephen Burrough, An. 1557. from Colmogro to Wardhouse, which was sent to seeke the Bona Esperanza, the Bona Confidentia, and the Philip and Mary, which were not heard of the yeere before. May.UPON Sunday the 23. of May, I departed with the Searchthrift from Colmogro, the latitude whereof is 64. degrees, 25. minutes, and the variation of the compasse, 5. degrees, 10 minutes from the North to the East. Wednesday we came tnd they said that he would bring newes with him. At a Northwest and by North sunne we departed from Wardhouse, toward Colmogro. 30 Wednesday we came to Kegor, where we met with the winde at East Southeast, so that we were faine to go in to a , if they may conveniently come by any thing. Concerning my voyage, because the winde was scant to goe back againe to Colmogro, I tarried to the Eastwards of the poynt Kegor, and sent to land, and baked two batches of bread in the ovens that the K
May.UPON Sunday the 23. of May, I departed with the Searchthrift from Colmogro, the latitude whereof is 64. degrees, 25. minutes, and the variation of the compasse, 5. degrees, 10 minutes from the North to the East. Wednesday we came to the Island called Pozanka, which Island is within foure leagues of the barre Berozova. It floweth here at an East and by South moone full sea. Saturday in the morning we departed from Pozanka, and plied to the barre of Ber6zova Gooba, whereupon wee came to anker at a lowe water, and sounded the said Barre with our two Skiffes, and found in the best upon the shoaldest of the barre 13. foote water by the rule. It higheth upon this barre, in spring streames 3. foote water: and an East Moone maketh a full sea upon this barre. Sunday in the morning wee departed from the barre of Berozova, and plied along by the shoalds in five fadome, untill I had sight of S. Nicholas roade, and then wee cast about to the Northwa
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