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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 2 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 2 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 41: search for health.—journey to Europe.—continued disability.—1857-1858. (search)
he Argylls at Inverary, and James Stirling near Dumbarton. On his return from Scotland he visited Lord Brougham at his seat near Penrith, William E. Forster at Burley, Wharfedale, the Earl of Carlisle at Castle Howard (whom he met for the first time after an interval of fifteen years,) and Lord Hatherton at Teddesley Park in Staffordshire. He passed a day at Llandudno in Wales as the guest of John Bright,—the first meeting of two kindred spirits. His last visits were to Mr. Gladstone at Hawarden, and to the Marquis of Westminster at Eaton Hall; and his last night was at Liverpool with Mr. Richard Rathbone, with whom he had a common sentiment on questions of peace, prison discipline, and slavery. He wrote to Mr. Cobden, November 7:— To-day I sail, against the advice of physicians and friends, who insist upon a longer fallow for my brain. But I cannot be contented to stay. Our American political duties are more exacting. Since I parted from you at Chichester I have seen the
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 49: letters to Europe.—test oath in the senate.—final repeal of the fugitive-slave act.—abolition of the coastwise slave-trade.—Freedmen's Bureau.—equal rights of the colored people as witnesses and passengers.—equal pay of colored troops.—first struggle for suffrage of the colored people.—thirteenth amendment of the constitution.— French spoliation claims.—taxation of national banks.— differences with Fessenden.—Civil service Reform.—Lincoln's re-election.—parting with friends.—1863-1864. (search)
d not write so if I had less confidence in your sincerity and goodness. I have been pained to learn that the Duchess of Sutherland, whose kindness to me enabled me to see you whom I already honored much, is still ailing. I hope that her generous nature may be spared yet longer to soften and quicken our social life. I am sure that she will rejoice when slavery, now in arms, is cast down, never to rise again. I think she would be glad to help at this overthrow. The date of your letter (Hawarden) reminds me of a pleasant day which I can never forget. To W. W. Story, Rome, January 1:— A happy New Year to you and yours! I think of you constantly, and always with affection, and vow letters. But my life is so crowded that I have found myself dropping correspondence that did not come under the head, if not of business, at least of public interest. The Psyche A copy of the antique, for which Sumner had given Story a commission. is superb, and I enjoy it much. You know the
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 1: Europe revisited--1877; aet. 58 (search)
y. Throughout the journeyings which followed, our mother had two objects in view: to see her own kind of people, the seekers, the students, the reformers, and their works; and to give Maud the most vivid first impression of all that would be interesting and valuable to her. These objects were not always easy to combine. After a few days at Chester (where she laments the restoration of the fine old oak of the cathedral, now shining like new, after a boiling in potash ) and a glimpse of Hawarden and Warwick, they proceeded to London and took lodgings in Bloomsbury (a quarter of high fashion when she first knew London, now given over to lodgings). Once settled, she lost no time in establishing relations with friends old and new. The Unitarian Association was holding its annual conference; one of the first entries in the Journal tells of her attending the Unitarian breakfast where she spoke about the poor children and the Sunday schools. Among her earliest visitors was Charles Ste